Student Caring - A Podcast for Professors
Join professors de Roulet and Pecoraro as they encourage professors to achieve success.
SC 160 How to be a Happier Professor

SC 160 How to be a Happier Professor
Part Two of “Getting Behind” – Prevention
~~~~~

How We Can Avoid – Getting Behind:

•  Don’t answer immediately to a request for a commitment to your time. Take a day and think it over.
•  Watch out for those committee members who will assign you some work if you are not at the meeting.
•  Politely reserve the rights to your time.
•  Divide up those big piles of work into bite sized tasks.
•  Don’t try to grade all of those papers in one night!
•  Are you the type of person who feels that you work better under pressure? Be careful.
•  Viewing your upcoming week, at all times, can help you gauge your workload.
•  Sit down, once a month to take a look at the month ahead, you’ll feel more in control.
•  As a last resort, you can call in sick for a day! This can provide a much needed stress relief.

How much work do I need to do to fulfill this obligation?
•  Sometimes the amount of work you put in (comments on papers) can overwealm the student.
•  Keep the amount of work that you give people, manageable.
•  Do good work, but do reasonable amounts of work as well.

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_160.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:09am PDT
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SC 159 Getting Behind – Diagnosis and Prescription

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 159 Getting Behind – the Diagnosis and Prescription
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Getting Behind – Diagnosis:

How can we identify when we are behind?
•  You know….   that dark feeling that comes over us when we realize that the papers are piling up.
•  The notion that we are just feeling overwhelmed and we are not sure what’s going on – dazed and confused.

TIP: Never lie to a judge when you are on jury duty. (Listen to David’s true story)

Reasons why professors can get behind.
• The rest of the university!  Those items that are not under our direct control.
• Over stuffing your syllabi to teach as much as possible.
• Saying “yes” to an additional commitment. “What was I thinking?

What can you do when you recognize that you are behind?
• Hit the pause button and take a mini retreat so you can identify your priorities.
• But, I don’t have time for a retreat! Bad sign. (You don’t want to discover yourself, looking between your feet at the cars behind you approach as you peer through the back window of the paramedic van.)
• In the David Allen book, “Getting Things Done,” he suggest doing a review, once a week.
• Sometimes we don’t want to clear our plates. After all, I am better at this than others and no, not me – I am not egotistic.
•  Ask yourself: Say, “Self, is the project really that important that I can’t give it to someone else?”
• And: “Is my teaching suffering because I am doing these other things?”
• Clear your schedule for the next three or four days.
• It is important to figure out how you got behind and put into place ways to prevent them in the future. – our next episode!

Direct download: sc_pod_159.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 12:56pm PDT
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SC 158 10 Surefire Ways to Piss Off Your Professor

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 158 10 Surefire Ways to Piss Off Your Professor

 

The number one selling higher education book on Amazon:

The Secrets of College Success / Second Edition / Lynn F. Jacobs & Jeremy S. Hyman

Secrets_2ndEd_Cover

 

http://www.thesecretsofcollegesuccess.com

10 Surefire Ways to Piss Off Your Professor

  1. Making excuses for missing class.
  2. Misbehaving in class.
  3. Challenging your professor publicly.
  4. Disputing a grade like a "mad dog."
  5. Seeming really stupid.
  6. Giving lame excuses for handing in a late paper or missing an exam.
  7. Treating the professor like your servant.
  8. Plagiarizing in super-obvious ways..
  9. Comparing your prof to other profs.
  10. Going over your prof's head.

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_158.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:04pm PDT
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SC 157 The 13 Warning Signs of a Bad Professor

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

The 13 Warning Signs of a Bad Professor
~~~~~

The number one selling higher education book on Amazon:

The Secrets of College Success / Second Edition / Lynn F. Jacobs & Jeremy S. Hyman

Secrets_2ndEd_Cover 

http://www.thesecretsofcollegesuccess.com

The 13 Warning Signs of a Bad Professor

  1. The professor is deadly boring.
  2. The professor is bummed out.
  3. The professor is condescending, combative, or full of him-or herself.
  4. The professor shows favoritism.
  5. The professor doesn’t give out a syllabus–or gives out a one-paragraph syllabus that is just the course description from the Web.
  6. The professor isn’t clear about the requirements and how much they count.
  7. The professor has incredibly petty rules.
  8. The professor can’t fill the whole class period.
  9. The professor seems unsure about the material.
  10. The professor presents the material in a confused or obscure way.
  11. The professor uses the class as a political platform.
  12. The professor never involves the students.
  13. The professor has no passion for the subject.

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_157.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 1:08pm PDT
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SC 156 Nota Bene Student Attendance

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 156 Nota Bene Student Attendance
~~~~~

Trends in class attendance

  • When we were in college, people pretty much attended class.
  • Today, we do see a strong motivation on the part of our students to be diligent about class attendance.
  • You can also tell, how attendance at your college is going on any give day, by the amount of cars in the parking lot.

Best practices

  • Communicate and enforce the college attendance policy to your students.
  • If we are consistent about taking role, that will communicate that we are in fact, watching and keeping track.
  • "Has anyone seen Mike in a while?" Everyone will take note - that you are taking note.
  • Make sure that students have regular assignments to turn in when they come to class. They only get credit for the paper when they come to class. Our students need our help with the importance of attendance.
  • Class: "By the way, if you arrive 10 minutes late or leave early, that counts as an absence." Everyone will get very quiet.
  • Make sure that your syllabus is not all "BARK."
  • We have a duty to make class engaging and interesting.
  • When a student misses our class and they contact us, we need to hold them accountable for the missed work. Don't enable the student by making it easy for them.

A colleagues approach - Lisa Alvarez

  • "I'm concerned about you because I think you are failing my class."
  • "I'm glad you came to see me today, but I have to tell you, I need to be fare to everyone in the class."

Ask yourself: Are you making them a better student or are you preparing them to be a better bad student?

 

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

 

Direct download: sc_pod_156.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 5:55pm PDT
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SC 155 No.4  What Your Students Probably Don't Know

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

Syllabus – Part Four
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Office hours

  • We find that students are communicating with us via emails instead of coming into our offices.
  • We need to let our students know what “Office Hours” actually are and what they are for.
  • Help your students by telling them specifically where your office is located.
  • We invite you to join us with our new service for students:  “One Minute Office Hour

College services available to students

  • Even though our students have access to the resources available, they often forget or do not know where to go for help.
  • It can be helpful for us to verbally explain to our students what the health center can and can not do for them.
  • Tell them what type of services the on campus police department has to offer.

Digital technology

  • Explain to your students how crucial it is that the regularly check their college email address. We should not assume that they are all aware of this.
  • Freshmen may need extra help accessing the course management system.

Please join us next week for section number four in the syllabus series.

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_155.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 11:14am PDT
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SC 154 No.3  What Your Students Probably Don't Know

Syllabus – Part Three
~~~~~

Open syllabus syllabus quiz

  • Daniel gives the “Open Syllabus Syllabus Quiz” A.K.A.: OSSQ to his class to encourage them to think about why they are there and what the learning process will be.

Sequence of assignments.

  • A chronological listing of each assignment, what the topic will be, and how it will be assessed.
  • Without a list of what the assignments are, there will be anxiety and confusion, both for the students and the professor.

Grades

  • Often, our students do not know what grades they have received and how they are doing in your class.
  • A syllabus needs to list what the assignments are and how they are weighted on day one.
  • We want our students to manage their own grades.

Late assignment policies

  • If students don’t know what your policies are regarding late work this will create many, many questions.
  • Spell out your policy: Assignments are not accepted late. Assignments may be turned in before the deadline.
  • A student may assume that your policies are just like those in another class.

Please join us next week for section number four in the syllabus series.

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_154.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:36am PDT
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SC 153 No. 2  What Your Students Probably Don't Know

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

Syllabus – Part Two
Rules for Learning

Class attendance

  • Communicate to your students that the class is a community and their attendance is essential to form a learning community. Your fellow students will need to work harder if you are not in class.
  • Policy: If the student misses more than 8 hours of instruction, the instructor drops them from the course.
  • Arriving late or leaving early is a tardy. 3 tardies equal 1 absence.

Meaningful class participation

  • Just “showing up” doesn’t mean that you are attending the class.
  • You need to come to class prepared for all in class discussions and activities.
  • If you do not come prepared to class, you may be dismissed for the day.
  • We want our students to be active not passive learners.

Academic dishonesty

  • BE ADVISED:  There are many online resources for students who want to purchase assignments.
  • You can try, but you can’t buy learning.
  • List the academic policy of the college.
  • Explain to your students that you will report any instance of academic dishonesty.
  • Reference: How To Cheat In College and What to do About It

 

 

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_153.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:30am PDT
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SC 152 No. 1 What Your Students Probably Don't Know

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

 

Book recommendation from Dr. Daniel de Roulet

Adulting: How to Become a Grown-up in 468 Easy(ish) Steps

510VK8Q1dbL._SX328_BO1,204,203,200_

 

  • Young adults today don’t seem to be launching all that well.
  • We see this every day in our classrooms.
  • We make assumptions about what our students know about college.

How to help our students understand some essential information in the course syllabus.

  • How we address the syllabus on day one is key.
  • When the answer a student asks us verbally, is on the syllabus, we need to refer them to that document instead of answering it for them. We want them to look at the syllabus often and use it as an essential resource.

Ways we can help our students know and understand what is on the syllabus.

  • The syllabus quiz. If you don’t pass, the quiz, you are dropped from the course.
  • Reading the syllabus to the class. (We do not recommend this.)

Your email address

  • This is essential.
  • Let your students know the best way they can reach you.

Office hours

  • We don’t see that students actually know what “office hours” are.
  • It is rare for our students to utilize our office hours. (This is one reason why we created the “One Minute Office Hour.”
  • Write a clear statement about why and when you have office hours.

What is a syllabus?

  • Our students may not know what a syllabus is.
  • For reasons not known to us, students avoid reading this document.
  • In writing, and verbally, we need to tell our students why the syllabus is important.
  • If we focus on the importance of the syllabus in relationship to their grade, we can get their attention.

What is this course?

  • Explain to your class what the course is about, they might not understand past, “I just know that I have to take this course.”
  • We find that our students walk into our class on the first day and that’s when they begin to figure out what the course is about.
  • We need to think about our class, what we know and also understand what our students don’t know.

Key dates

  • Give your students essential and important dates.
  • Tell your students to put these down in their daily planners.
  • Tell your students to buy and use a daily planner or refer them to this video.

 

Course materiels 

  • Students, for a variety of reasons do not get all of the required course materials.
  • Tell your students what it means to have a book on reserve in the library.
  • Students tend to spend as little money as possible on the text book. Often this is a disaster.
  • Access to the online course management system and access to a printer is essential.
  • It is good idea for our students to buy a folder for each class and put all information in them.
  • It is in your best interest to purchase a day-timer and use it daily.

 We wish for you all, good first weeks of instruction.

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_152.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 5:34pm PDT
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SC 151 New Year Resolutions for Professors

SC 151 New Year Resolutions for Professors

 

Professor New Year Resolution #1: Learn how to learn all my students names.

  • Hey, you there in the third row – go ahead!
  • We find seating charts to be really helpful.
  • Many group assignments requiring students to say their names as they present is helpful as we hear their names repeatedly.

Professor New Year Resolution #2: Don’t fall behind in my grading.

  • Daniel practices the “Grade 5 papers a day” method.
  • Relative calm and order prevail when we don’t procrastinate.

Professor New Year Resolution #3: Eat healthier and drink less coffee.

  • We are unified in our resolve to ignore the ‘less coffee’ portion of this tip.
  • Why is it so difficulty for us to eat and drink what is good for us? Stress?

Professor New Year Resolution #4: Don’t say ‘yes’ to all potential committee assignment requests.

  • This can be difficult due to our commitment to shared governance.
  • If we do to much on this side of life, our teaching can suffer.
  • Decide where you can be most effective.

Professor New Year Resolution #5: Spend less time on the Internet

  • Our is not a thinking profession at all, is it?
  • The Internet can be a huge distraction for us and rob us of precious productive time.

Professor New Year Resolution #6: Don’t check email 20 times a day!

  • Why do we do this? We don’t want to miss anything!
  • Our students check their email – constantly.
  • Students and colleagues ask: “Did you get my email?”

Professor New Year Resolution #7: Improve my professorial wardrobe.

  • Do you dress like a professor? (We are not always successful in this area.)
  • At least, for the benefit of our students, look like a professor, it really matters.

We invite you to join us in 2016 and beyond by sharing your work with the international Student Caring community.

Opportunities for you join us:

  • Write a guest blog post about…
    • Your research
    • Something you are passionate about
    • Something you want to share with students, professors, or parents.

Announcing the debut of the “One Minute Office Hour“ on January 1, 2016.

Please – share this with all college students in your world, it would really mean a lot to us as we seek to help more and more students succeed in college.

One Minute Office Hour LogoStudents who most often do not come into our offices during our office hours could benefit from a one minute (TED TALK style) video that they could access on their smart phones or computers.

  • We welcome your contributions to this video cast, publishing every Friday.
  • To participate, email david@studentcaring.com and he will get back to you with participation details.
  • Have you always had something that you wanted to share with all college students? What are you known for? Here’s your chance to tell the world.

 

If you are interested in being a guest to this podcast, just let us know!

We are continuing our research for book #2: What Professors Wish Parents Knew About College.

If you are interested in being interviewed for this book, please let us know.
David is researching this book during his sabbatical leave, spring of 2016.

 

 We wish for you all, a Happy New Year!

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_151.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:04am PDT
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