Student Caring - A Podcast for Professors
Join professors de Roulet and Pecoraro as they encourage professors to achieve success.
SC 177 Proféssormon GO

In honor of the Pokémon GO craze that is sweeping the nation, we feature Proféssormon in the episode.   Proféssormon GO | Student Caring

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The Professor as Presenter - Introduction To Our New Series
This podcast was recorded on July 13, 2016 in Sunny Southern California USA

Using the "Backwards Course Design" approach - What are asking the question: What our students experiencing?

  • What are our students seeing?
    • Us, each other, the room, what we present, and of course – what's on their smartphones or outside the window.
  • What are our students hearing?
    • Us, each other, and what we present in an audible form.
  •  What are our students feeling?
    • What are their emotions? What emotions are we guiding them to experience?
  • What are our students thinking and learning?
    • This is where it all comes together.
  • When we get up in front of the classroom we may be thinking:
    • How do I look?
    • How do I sound?

Our "Student Caring" approach is: The audience (Our students) comes first. In this new series we are going to focus on how to get into the heads of your students.

TOPICS IN THE NEW PODCAST SERIES

PHYSICAL

  • What do our students see when we walk into the room?
  • What do we look like and what does that say about us?
  • This can also be an endless source of entertainment for our students!

ATTITUDE

  • What is our attitude?
  • What is our perceived attitude by our students?
  • Are we excited and ready to go?
  • Are we self–confident or self–doubting?

MATERIEL

  • Are we prepared?
  • Do we look prepared?
  • How is the pace of the class? Am I rushed? Do I finish 15 minutes early?
  • Are we interesting and engaging or do we sound like a textbook?
  • Are our topics appropriate for the form of an in class lecture?

SPEECH

  • How is our language, sound, tone, boredom factor.
  • How do we sound to our students?
  • Our students are experts at hearing people lecture.

USE OF MEDIA

  • What are we putting up onto the screen in the classroom?
  • Our students are used to having control of their screens - now we are in control of the content.
  • Our students consume more media in a week than we most likely did in 6 months at their age.

OUTSIDE OF CLASS EXTENSIONS

  • Learning management systems have become an important part of the learning experience.
  • These computer networks are expanding the space of the classroom.

 

~~~~~

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

###

SC 177 Proféssormon GO

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.
The Caring Professor




The Caring Professor

 

Direct download: sc_pod_177.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 7:28pm PDT
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SC 176 Faculty Development

In this podcast we are cheerleaders for your faculty development.

This podcast was recorded on July 1, 2016 in Irvine, California USA
Happy New Fiscal Year!

DEVELOPING OUR SKILLS AS FACULTY:

  • There’s nothing like a good conference! We look to learn how to improve our skills.
  • Conference selection:
    • A wonderful location!
    • A conference that is well funded and offers top speakers.
    • Identifying a time that works with our academic schedule.
  • Take a look at bringing a speaker to your campus to conduct a seminar.
    • This can benefit an entire campus of faculty.

Please share your favorite conference with us and we’ll share them with everyone. david@studentcaring.com

Attending international conferences can open your eyes to teaching techniques that you might be aware of in your country.

Now that budgets are available for the new year, this is a good time to request funds to travel during the upcoming academic year.

 

 

~~~~~

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_176.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 4:12pm PDT
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SC 175 Day One - Reading Your Students

You walk into your class on day one and…

READING THE CLASS ON THE FIRST DAY:

What do we see?

  • The group is usually mixed, some want to be there and some don’t.
  • The students who really don’t want to be there at all tend to stand out.

Understanding:

  • Understanding why they don’t want to be in your class can be a game changer.
  • They might not like the subject, the time of day, and you, yes you!

What we can do to help our students:

  • Try to interpersonally engage them.
  • The second class is a good time to take action on what we have discovered in the first class.
  • Good times to make that personal connection are before or after class and during a break.
  • On the first day, we can give our students an opportunity to write. This will give us valuable insights as to where they are in their life / educational journey.
  • Once a disconnected student has been identified we can let them know that we have office hours and we are available to them.
  • Planning our classes well and making them un predicable sometimes can help to keep them on their toes.
  • Look for a specific way that you can incorporate, into an early class, a topic that your disconnected student has an interest in.

~~~~~

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_175.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 3:22pm PDT
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SC 174 Student Earthquakes

NOTES FROM THE STUDENT CARING PODCAST FOR PROFESSORS

SC 174 
Student Earthquakes

You may be saying to yourself, self, “What’s a Student Earthquake?”

Because Daniel and David live in California, they are sometimes nervous about the BIG ONE. As a result, this topic has been known to arise from time to time in their podcasts, books, and posts. For this podcast and post, it refers to our students when they are about to take a break from college. A.K.A. “Stop Out.”

A STUDENT COMES INTO YOUR OFFICE AND SAYS: “I’M THINKING OF STOPPING OUT.”

Practical Advice:

  • Advise your student to exit properly. Drop your courses, don’t just pack your bags and hit the road.
  • They may be able to obtain a medical withdrawal. They should meet with the registrar to discover their options.
  • If they have their sights set on another university, teach them how to accomplish that transition. Often our student don’t know how to do this.
  • It might be that the best next step for them is to not stop out.

Mentoring:

  • Get a good idea why things are not working out.
  • Confidentially, inquire as to why they are thinking about stopping out.
  • You might discover that they are having only one large problem and everything else is going very well.
  • Offer options to their situation that they may not be aware of.
  • Inquire: Are you having a time problem? Are you having relationship issues? Why do you want to stop?
  • You can offer to write a letter of recommendation for them.
  • You can stay in touch with them, even though they have left college. “How are you doing, are you able to return to college?”
  • Remind your student about what you have seen them to well. They can really use that encouragement.
  • Pause, take time to talk to them when they need it the most.

~~~~~

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_174.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 5:00pm PDT
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SC 173 Helping Students Adjust to the New Prof. – YOU!

NOTES FROM THE STUDENT CARING PODCAST FOR PROFESSORS

 

 

How to help our students adjust to a new professor.

Your arrival at a new university might be very difficult for continuing students.
Student: “What do you mean professor Jones is gone?” “Who is this new professor anyways? I’m doomed, doomed I say, doomed.”
Moreover, we are the new professor at the beginning of every semester.

Our students are usually experiencing other new professors at the same time.

How we can help:

  • Acknowledge that they are experiencing a change and that can be difficult them.
  • Communicate up front with your students about your teaching style.
  • Install confidence in your students about the change of professors.
  • Our students learn subjects from us as the unique persons that we are.
  • Don’t judge yourself by how much the students miss the previous professor.
  • Recognize that our students will compare us to the previous professor.

Your purpose as a professor is not to be liked, it’s to connect with
those students who your naturally going to connect with
and also to connect with those students
who really need your help.

~~~~~

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_173.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 12:09pm PDT
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SC 172 Helping Student Athletes

NOTES FROM THE STUDENT CARING PODCAST FOR PROFESSORS

Helping Student Athletes | Student Caring

 

HELPING OUR STUDENTS WHO ARE IN SPORTS.

  • This can be a sore topic for some professors. We are here to help.
  • Unrealistic expectations:
    • Sports, in high school, are extremely important to parents. Sports can help with college admissions and scholarships.
    • College is about much more than just sports.
  • From a professors perspective:
    • We want our students to do well in all areas.
    • We don’t want our sports students to focus 100% on their sport at the expense of their education.
    • Your education is going to help you succeed in life.
    • Your educational goals are the most important ones during the college years.
  • Sports Students Strengths
    • Sports students understand teamwork.
    • Sports students have self discipline.
    • Sports students understand personal health.
  • Sports Students Concerns
    • Sports students may need to miss many classes to participate in their sport.
    • Sports students can surround themselves with just fellow sports students.

~~~~~

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_172.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 11:11am PDT
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SC 171 Teaching Students in the Arts

NOTES FROM THE STUDENT CARING PODCAST FOR PROFESSORS

Teaching Students in the Arts

 

HELPING OUR STUDENTS WHO ARE IN THE ARTS.

  • A concern… Sometimes students in the arts are not as concerned about straight academic work.
  • They may not see how their other classes can help them in life.
  • Students in the arts sometimes have complicated schedules.
  • Students will have periods of time, usually just before a performance, when they are 100% not focused on your class.
  • We can help them by being predicable with our course schedules.
  • If our students can let us know when they are performing, it will give us an an insight as to what they are experiencing during a particular week.
  • Arts students have a great deal of stress about graduating.
  • Arts students have transferable skills:
    • They can speak in front of an audience without passing out!
    • They can collaborate.
    • They can meet deadlines.
    • They have people and communication skills.
  • We can help these students by showing them how the subject that we are teaching can help them in the arts.
  • Skills in the arts do not always lead to a career in the arts.

 

~~~~~

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_171.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:48pm PDT
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SC 170 Helping Employed Students

NOTES FROM THE STUDENT CARING PODCAST FOR PROFESSORS

SC 170 Helping Employed Students

 

HELPING STUDENTS WHO ARE ALREADY EMPLOYED WHEN THEY ENTER COLLEGE.

  • Daniel knows of a full time student who is working 70 hours per week!
  • Ask your student, who may be having difficulties: “How much do you need to be working?”
  • We find that many students are working more than they need to. Delayed gratification is not easy for any of us.
  • Encourage your student to put their education near the top of their list of priorities.
  • Enlighten your students about income possibilities of a future job.
  • Encourage your students to look for work on campus.
  • Many employers are “college student friendly.”
  • The work schedule needs to be flexible – around the class schedule.
  • When our class schedule is predicable, it helps our students plan around work.

 

~~~~~

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

###

SC 170 HELPING EMPLOYED STUDENTS

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.
The Caring Professor




The Caring Professor

 

Direct download: sc_pod_170.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:23pm PDT
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SC 169 Teaching International Students

NOTES FROM THE STUDENT CARING PODCAST FOR PROFESSORS

Teaching International Students

Our research and reference source for this podcast is from the University of Virginia: Strategies For Teaching International Students

CTE-Logo-Horiz-Color-Tagline-Web-Sized

GENERAL PRINCIPLES

  • Be explicit about your expectations and try to give examples or model what you are talking about.
  • Focus on meaning first and grammar and style later.
  • Stress fluency in communication along with correctness.
  • Try not to foster the student’s fear of errors.
  • Reinforce the student’s strengths while explaining what he/she still needs to work on.
  • Recognize that students may be differently acculturated to classroom situations.
  • Don’t assume that a student who looks “foreign” is an international student or that one who exhibits writing difficulties is necessarily a non-native speaker.

IN THE CLASSROOM:

When students make unclear remarks, paraphrase them before building on them (“so you are saying that . . .?”). This gives such students an opportunity to correct you if you have not understood what was meant; other students also understand the comment and so are less likely to ignore it. To avoid singling out international students, apply this technique to American students’ comments as well.

MAKE SURE STUDENTS UNDERSTAND DIRECTIONS AND ASSIGNMENTS.

Students from many cultures-and many individuals-believe it is polite to nod in response to someone’s words. When such a nod masks lack of comprehension, difficulties arise. If students have misunderstood previous directions, check with them individually after class about future assignments. Instead of asking, “Do you understand this assignment?” say, “Tell me what you need to do for Wednesday.” You can clarify directions for all students by having a volunteer rephrase them during class.

WRITE IT DOWN!

Use visual aids and write down key terms during lectures or while giving directions. This will help non-native speakers significantly with their comprehension of the material.

Let students who hesitate to speak in class contribute first in small groups or through electronic discussion groups on Instructional Toolkit.
For students who hesitate to speak on the spur of the moment, provide assignments or questions that the student can prepare beforehand. To avoid favoritism, you can give these assignments or questions to all students.

~~~~~

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_169.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:23am PDT
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SC 168 Teaching Students With Learning Disabilities

NOTES FROM THE STUDENT CARING PODCAST FOR PROFESSORS

SC 168 TEACHING STUDENTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES

Our research and reference source for this podcast is the Learning Disabilities Association of America

Student Caring

Legal Rights of College Students with LD

Academic accommodations are required by law for eligible college students with LD. Accommodations are changes in the learning and testing environments that give college students with LD an equal opportunity to learn. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and its amendments (ADAAA) require that reasonable accommodations be made available to college students who have current documentation of learning disabilities and who request learning and/or testing accommodations.

Student Responsibilities

Student responsibilities include the following:

  • To self-identify as a person with a disability to the disability services office at the college or university.
  • To provide up-to-date documentation of the disability to the disability services office.
  • To request academic accommodations that will insure access to information and testing on an equal level with students who do not have disabilities.
  • To self-identify to faculty as a student with a disability and provide them
    with a copy of the Individual Student Profile developed with the disability services office.
  • To remind faculty in a timely manner of academic accommodations required for tests and assignments.
  • To ultimately accept responsibility for his or her successful education. This includes maintaining satisfactory academic levels, attending classes, completing assignments, behaving appropriately, and communicating regularly with the appropriate office and/or individual regarding specific needs.

Faculty Responsibilities

If students request instructional and/or testing accommodations in a class, they must disclose the need for the accommodations to the instructor and give the instructor any documentation provided by the disability services office, typically a letter from that office validating the need for the specified accommodations. Students do not have to disclose their disabilities to their instructor, only the need for accommodations.

The instructors’ responsibilities include the following:

  • To allow students to disclose their disabilities in an appropriate and confidential place.
  • To acknowledge the rights of students with dignity and respect.
  • To maintain the integrity of academic standards.
  • To maintain student confidentiality at all times.
  • To provide reasonable instructional and/or testing accommodations.

~~~~~

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

###

SC 168 TEACHING STUDENTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.
The Caring Professor




The Caring Professor

Direct download: sc_pod_168.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 2:50pm PDT
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