Student Caring - A Podcast for Professors
Join professors de Roulet and Pecoraro as they encourage professors to achieve success.
SC 202 A Student Confides Their Depression

SITUATION: While reading and grading a student’s writing assignment, they reveal to you that they are deeply depressed.

Listen to Daniel and David on Friday - USA - Inauguration Day, as they explore this topic.

 

Direct download: sc_pod_202.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 7:22am PDT
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SC 201 Complaints About Another Professor

A student comes to your office hours and is complaining that one of their professors is not teaching them what they need to learn in the class, which a pre-requisite to your class.

 

Listen to Daniel and David on Friday the Thirteenth, as they explore this topic.

Direct download: sc_pod_201.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 4:14pm PDT
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SC 200 Thank You Notes from Students

Professors Pecoraro & de Roulet celebrate Podcast No. 200 in this special episode featuring students letters to their professors.

Direct download: sc_pod_200.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 8:00am PDT
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SC 199 Cheating During a Test

Following a test, you receive an email from a student informing you that the person sitting in front of them was looking at their smart phone during the test. They say: “You should be paying closer attention during your tests.”

Listen to Daniel and David as they explore this situation.

Referenced Web Page:  Podcast #15  http://studentcaring.com/howtocheatincollege/

 

What would you do?

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_199.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 1:38pm PDT
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SC 198 Your Star Student's Star is Fading

You are the Professor In charge of a group or team based course. These could be a sports team, performing group, or research laboratory. Your STAR student, who was carrying the group has become unreliable.

Consequences:
The team is loosing games - consequently casting a negative light on your university and could result in less funding.

The research project is falling behind schedule and is in jeopardy of loosing their funding. This will directly impact your income.

OPTIONS / DISCUSSION

Daniel: I fell like we are back in ETHICS 101, this is not an easy situation.

You and the student:
You need to put aside all of the other concerns and concentrate on the student.
Try to discover why their performance is faltering and seek to help them.
What can I do as a professor?

Why do high achieving students falter?
They can be in a position of high responsibility for the first time in their lives.

We are not there to put out the absolute best product, we are there to help students learn.
The team or performance group may not be the best, that's okay. 
If the focus is on winning, then we are not really teaching anymore.

If your team is very public, the decision you make will influence the public about not only you, but your university. 

It is wise not rely on one person (student) to be in a key leadership position. Build a team.

What would you do?

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_198.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 2:06pm PDT
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SC 197 Can't Afford the Tuition

Student Centered Decisions While Professoring
SC 197 Can't Afford the Tuition

NOTES FROM OUR PODCAST

Daniel and David explore a challenging student situation and discuss options.

SITUATION
Your student comes to your office hours during finals week and informs you that their parents can't afford the tuition and they have to go back home to a more affordable and less prestigious college. They want your advice.

You have someone in front of you who is very much in need of good advice.

OPTIONS / DISCUSSION
Take time to actively listen to what your student has to say.

During difficulty meetings like this, recognize that what you say to your student may be forgotten. It is a good idea to take notes, then give them to your student - on paper. 

Daniel:  Often times, I forget particular situations with my students in my classroom. It would server me well, as a prof. to remember that a number of my students are there because they or their family are making pretty significant sacrifices. As I walk into the classroom, I want to be able to give them good things. I want to be able to honor the sacrifice and commitment they are making by offering them the best that I can offer them.

David: This may be the last time I sit and visit with this student. I want to make sure that every single word I say and the advice I give is "good." Last impressions last a very long time.

Advice for your student.
Encourage them to look deep with themselves and recall their hopes and dreams. Explain that this change in their academic career should not dissuade them. There are many educational institutions that help them to realize their goals.

After giving them the good financial advice, say something truthful and encouraging to that student about their potential. You may offer to write them a letter of recommendation that is affirming.

Share with your student a story of a previous student, or yourself, who was in a similar situation and it turned out well.

 

What would you do?

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_197.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 12:50pm PDT
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SC 196 Student Centered Decisions While Professoring

Student Centered Decisions While Professoring
SC 196 Tough Love or Tough?

 

 NOTES FROM OUR PODCAST

Daniel and David explore a challenging student situation and discuss options.

A likable student with potential is not performing up to PAR.

The grade they will earn while in your class will determine their future at your college.

 

What would you do?

 

Direct download: sc_pod_196.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 1:44pm PDT
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SC 195 Burnout Solutions #3

 NOTES FROM OUR PODCAST

Focusing on the positive:

  • Multitasking comes upon us slowly as we take on additional responsibilities over time.
  • Often, we can't do much about our current schedule, however, we can look ahead to a future academic year and make some changes.
  • During your holiday break:
    • Look at how your last semester went.
    • Think about how many plates you have in the air.
    • What plates give you enjoyment and which ones do not?
  • Choose not to make the negative aspects of your job – a focus.
  • Journaling can provide a place to reflect on your job and a place to process your feelings.

A Holiday Break Challenge:

  • Look over your daily school life calendar.
    • Mark in red those activities that you do not enjoy.
    • Mark in green those activities that you do enjoy.
    • Plot a strategy to turn more of your hours to green.

What do others observe that you do well and enjoy?

Try to remember, during this break, why you got into this career in the first place.

 

We’re basing our podcasts on an application of Dr. Dike Drummond’s book, Stop Physician Burnout: What to Do When Working Harder Isn’t Working. Dr. Drummond was a successful family physician, working his dream job in a dream location, when he realized he could not continue. His burnout was so severe that he walked away from the practice of medicine, and now dedicates his time to helping doctors avoid burnout and find meaning and satisfaction in their profession.

Unfortunately, most of the ideas and observations Dr. Drummond presents are also present in higher education. Our task will be to apply what fits to the educator’s world, and to offer some discipline-specific observations as well.

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_195.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 4:08pm PDT
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SC 194 Burnout Solutions #2

SOLUTIONS TO EDUCATOR BURNOUT NO. 2

FOR ALL OF OUR U.S. FRIENDS, HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

BURNOUT IS A DILEMMA, RATHER THAN A PROBLEM:

  • If your problem is that you have to grade 25 papers, the solution is to grade them.
  • REALITY CHECK: You realize that when you grade them, they will be done, but what will happen next? There’s always more. That’s a dilemma.
  • We seek to adopt a mindset that solves our dilemma.
  • We see our colleagues always taking on extra work.
  • Dr. Dike Drummond:    “You solve a problem and you manage a dilemma.”
  • In his book, Dr. Drummond differentiates between “problems” and “dilemmas.” A problem has a clear solution and can, indeed, be solved. A dilemma is something more complicated—something without a clear solution or a problem that has been in place for a very long time. Faculty who serve on college or university committees may be tempted to work on what they think are problems, only to find that their work is seemingly being wasted on a dilemma. Politics in a department might seem like a problem, but the interpersonal roots of the problem, compounded over time, can have transformed what was once a problem into a dilemma.
  • You and who every your boss is need have a talk about healthy productivity and personal energy.
  • Daniel, upon his return from a recent sabbatical trip to Ethiopia states: I realized that I need to put a couple of things in my life that prevent me from using all of my life for work.

DO THE BIG 180:

  • Focus on what you want instead of what you don’t.
  • As educators, we are problem solvers. Sometimes the problems can’t be solved.
  • How many emails do you receive that are negative? Do you know what this student did?!#%
  • Find something that you really enjoy at work. What would your job look like if you focused on that one thing?

MORE TO COME!

We’re basing our podcasts on an application of Dr. Dike Drummond’s book, Stop Physician Burnout: What to Do When Working Harder Isn’t Working. Dr. Drummond was a successful family physician, working his dream job in a dream location, when he realized he could not continue. His burnout was so severe that he walked away from the practice of medicine, and now dedicates his time to helping doctors avoid burnout and find meaning and satisfaction in their profession.

Unfortunately, most of the ideas and observations Dr. Drummond presents are also present in higher education. Our task will be to apply what fits to the educator’s world, and to offer some discipline-specific observations as well.

WE WELCOME YOUR COMMENTS, FEEDBACK AND GUEST POST SUBMISSIONS.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

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SC 194 BURNOUT SOLUTIONS #2

The Caring Professor

The Caring Professor

Direct download: sc_pod_194.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 10:16am PDT
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SC 193 Burnout Solutions #1

SC 193 Burnout Solutions #1

student-caring

We’re basing our podcasts on an application of Dr. Dike Drummond’s book, Stop Physician Burnout: What to Do When Working Harder Isn’t Working. Dr. Drummond was a successful family physician, working his dream job in a dream location, when he realized he could not continue. His burnout was so severe that he walked away from the practice of medicine, and now dedicates his time to helping doctors avoid burnout and find meaning and satisfaction in their profession.

Unfortunately, most of the ideas and observations Dr. Drummond presents are also present in higher education. Our task will be to apply what fits to the educator’s world, and to offer some discipline-specific observations as well.

 SOLUTIONS TO EDUCATOR BURNOUT

 

No. 1:  Your inner perfectionist critic:

  • We are our own worse critic.
    • Oh, I could do better.
    • I can't grade papers fast enough.
    • I could have done better in that meeting.
  • Our response: "Thank you for sharing."

No. 2:  Burnout is a problem, not a dilemma:

  • We can solve problems.

No. 3:  Do the big 180:

  • Focus on what you want instead of what you don't.

No. 4: You are not a super hero, become a great plate spinner instead:

  • Learn how to spin one plate really well. Once you have done that, consider adding another plate.

No. 5:  Celebrate all wins:

  • Lean to be happy will all wins and don't focus on the failures.
    • Treat yourself like a good dog. (A cute one.)

Your inner perfectionist critic:

  • Our desire to be perfect is motivated by a strong desire to be the best.
  • Our training (graduate school) forces us to strive for perfection.
  • Perfection can lead to despair. 
  • Student: "Oh, that professor is just coasting."
  • Talk back to the voices in your head:
    • "I hear what you're saying, thanks." Now, move on.

Your inner perfectionist critic:

  • Our desire to be perfect is motivated by a strong desire to be the best.
  • Our training (graduate school) forces us to strive for perfection.

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_193.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 10:09pm PDT
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