Student Caring - A Podcast for Professors (higher education)
Join professors de Roulet and Pecoraro as they encourage professors to achieve success.

In this podcast - #251, Daniel and David explore a caring approach to student excuses.

Direct download: pod_251.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 6:35pm PDT
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In this milestone podcast - #250, Daniel and David explore a caring approach to three types of disruptive student behavior.

Direct download: pod_250.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 12:39pm PDT
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July 29, 2018
Welcome to the first episode in our new series: Students Who Drive You Crazy!

In this mid-summer podcast, we take a break from our summer of intensive writing to speak about "The Bargaining Student"- who may be driving you crazy and how to help them, from a caring perspective.

Enjoy!

 

David & Daniel

Direct download: pod_249.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 1:57pm PDT
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Following a couple of bouts with the flu, Daniel and David return to share their thoughts on meaningful work as a professor.

Direct download: pod_246.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 6:47pm PDT
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As 2017 comes to a close, we offer some tips for selecting an academic conference in 2018. 

Happy New Year!

Dr. Daniel de Roulet 
Prof. David Pecoraro 

 

Direct download: pod_245.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:15am PDT
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Here's another one of our most popular podcast episodes: Caring Online
Updated commentary by Daniel and David

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Golden Oldie - Replay
Podcast #45
Caring Online

 

Caring Online

The Online Challenge? Caring in a Different Kind of Presence.

“We worry about a loss of physical presence and all that goes with it.”

How “Student Caring” can help with online education (Courses which are 100% online).

Our Concerns:

  • Online education is education-light—there is little way of controlling or determining the quality of the instruction and learning.
  • For those concerned about the student side of the equation—whether students are doing enough work to earn the credit—this aspect of learning is still controlled by the instructor and her or his department.
  • How do I know that the person doing the work is the student—not a parent, a significant other, or a paid “for-hire” student?
  • Aren’t online classes an excellent place to hide for students uncomfortable with the course’s primary language, or the subject matter, or the physical classroom? Yes and no…and for bad and good.

How can a “Student Caring” approach affect an online class?

  • Put ground rules and expectations in place and up front. This is an act of caring.
  • Use discussion boards to build community.

We explore this topic more fully in our upcoming book: The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching.

Sound Bites:

  • Parents are hiring, “Students for hire,” to take college courses online for their son or daughter.
  • I have one student who spends 30 hours of work on her essays.
  • The online class environment can relieve anxiety for E.S.L. (English as a Second Language) students.
  • Online classes seem to attract folks who tend to motivate themselves.
  • When you are taking an online class, dress like you are going to an in person class.
  • We don’t want merely teach like “Chalk and Talk” in a digital environment.
  • Make sure that there are opportunities to put in a little entertainment into your lectures.
  • Get involved with those discussion groups.
  • I am seeing people who are disconnecting from Facebook.
  • Think of your online class as an opportunity for personal connection.

Professors who are often are seen by students as role models, are also models of adult thinking.

 

Direct download: pod_244.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 12:00pm PDT
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Here's one of our most popular podcast episodes:  HOW TO FAIL A CLASS.
Updated commentary by Daniel and David

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Golden Oldies - Replay
Podcast #242
How to Fail a Class

 

In my Career Directions and Your Daily Bread class, I teach a variety of lessons to my students about how to make the transition from college to career. As part of the assignment to design and publish their own professional web site, I teach them the basics of how to write a blog post. The following blog post–really an open letter to college students, was submitted by Ms. Grace Johnston. It is my pleasure to feature it here on the Student Caring web site. If you want to listen to Grace read the letter, just click on the play button or go to iTunes and search for the Student Caring Podcast.    Prof. David Pecoraro

 

Dear fellow college students,

Getting straight A’s in college is important, but not nearly as important as what you could be doing instead of “How to Fail a Class”going to class, studying, and doing homework. College is full of useless things. Memorization skills? Who needs that? Reading and comprehension? Psh! General knowledge and information about daily life and the world? Boring!

What we learn in school will never follow us into real life, so why even bother? Here are a few tips on how to make the least out of your class!


Use your phone during class

Being distracted and disconnected is a key to future bad performance. Texting, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr; I want you to pick up your phone right now and immerse yourself in these things because you will be glad you did later! Especially when your professor clues you in on valuable information that’s not on the study guide for the next exam. You might as well disrespect the speaker while you’re at it!

Even if your homework assignments actually rely on a textbook, buy it and DO NOT touch it.

There is no better way to dissociate yourself with the course you’re taking than to purchase the required text and never open it. Who wants to waste their valuable social media/video game/nap time with reading a textbook that will help you understand the material that the professor babbles about in class? Only those of us who want to fail! The pros outweigh the cons; you’ll be short a few bucks, but you’ll have NO IDEA what’s going on in class.

DO NOT study.

Studying is a sure-fire way to get an excellent grade on exams and quizzes. We do not want success and progress to occur in your time at college, so put down the highlighter and the flash cards. Again, who wants to waste their precious time with studying? Your time at college is meant for other things like going out with friends, wasting your parents’ money, or gaining fifteen pounds. 

After the professor takes roll, leave as if you’re going to use the restroom and DO NOT come back.

Why on earth would you want to sit through a BORING, USELESS, INFORMATIONALLY VOID lecture when you’ve already got your name down on the attendance sheet? Only if you want to actually do well in class, of course! Use all of the time you’ve saved to do the really important stuff, like taking a nap, not finding a job, and avoiding all responsibilities.

Make fun patterns on your Scantron.

You could fill in all of your answers as “a” and be boring, or you could make your exam time much more interesting. Try to make squiggles, lightning bolts, zigzags, or, if you’re more advanced in Scantron art, a double helix. Don’t be afraid to let your artistic abilities flow, because that’s all that you have going for you in the future.

 DO NOT turn in any assignments.

This is a big one that fail-savvy students tend to miss. In some classes, assignments make up 50% of your grade. Imagine if you even TRIED to make an effort to complete one and turn it in on time. Avoid them at all costs; you’ll be glad you did.

Extra credit? More like torture!

Extra credit is absolutely detrimental to your failure. It could cause your grade to move up A WHOLE LETTER. Wow! Who would have thought that it could be so evil?

These are only a few tips to get you on your way to fail-ville. I hope these tricks and ideas help you and inspire you to get your grades down so low that you lose your scholarship.

A little disclaimer: some of these tips will not work for everyone, so try them all out and see which ones benefit you the most. I wish you luck!

Happy academic probation,

Grace Johnston

Grace Johnston

College Student, Educational Philosopher, Self-Professed Comedienne
Freelance Editor and Proofreader, Technical Theatre Major
Email

 

 

Right or control click here to download the MP3 of the Podcast.

How To Fail A Class

 

 

Professors David C. Pecoraro and Daniel de Roulet, with over 50 years of combined teaching, faculty development and administrative experience, provide professional mentoring services for professors wishing to improve in the following areas:

  • Course organization and management
  • Syllabus and lesson plan construction
  • Creating successful examinations, assignments, projects, and field trips
  • Improving instructor-student communication and rapport
  • Constructing a career plan
  • Mock job interview
  • Other areas? (Let us know.)

You E-mail us with a one page narrative of your current situation and the area(s) where you want to improve.

We'll reply to you with a list of available dates and time for your one-hour appointment and payment information.          

  Start Step 1. 

1. You select a date and time, provide us with your contact information in the form of a telephone number or Skype account name. 2. Deposit $200. USD (One-time-flat-fee)  into our PayPal account.

1. We'll reply to you confirming the date and time of your session and your paid fee. 2. We begin an analysis of your narrative and prepare for your mentoring session. 

We'll telephone / Skype you at the scheduled time and conduct your session.

During this one precious hour, the two of us focus on you - your vision, your goals, and your personal and professional development. We find this most effective when it becomes a shared conversation between us.

Within 5 business days, we will E-mail you with an action plan and accompanying materials.
Available to you, is a thirty-minute followup session within 4 months from the first session. Just contact us to schedule that meeting.

###

Completely Confidential: We understand the personal and sensitive nature of these important areas and promise to you that we will never discuss them with anyone, ever. We retain your information only for the purposes of the above steps. When our communications are concluded, we delete all information.

Biographies
Professor 
David C. Pecoraro, M.F.A.
I have been a teaching college professor since 1980 and am passionate about all that I have learned about the profession of teaching, which I love. While I teach general education requirements in the arts, my department home has always been in the theatre. I teach courses in the area of design, management and production: Stage Management, Lighting Design, Introduction to Theatre, and others. I have taught at the undergraduate level at a community college and a private university and at the graduate level where I taught stage management for a large university.

I am passionate about interacting with my colleagues, globally, about the profession of teaching. Within that, of course, “Student Caring.” I have been teaching long enough to have observed how, when integrated with excellent instruction, can make all the difference in the world for the student. Within that scope, I am especially passionate about course design, in-class instruction, and the transition from college to career.

Dr. Daniel de Roulet, Ph.D.
After receiving a Ph.D. in English from the University of California, Irvine in 1992, I have been a college professor and administrator, and currently teach writing and literature.  I have led revisions to general education and first-year curricula, worked with developing educational assessment plans of student learning, and received undergraduate teaching awards. I have also coordinated a writing program for at-risk students. My experience is at four-year universities, a four-year college, and at community colleges.

My desire is to bring a sense of personal care into each class I teach, helping students to become adult thinkers and to be equipped for the world after college.  Nothing is quite like participating in a student’s discovery or rediscovery of education—this, and my continued learning in a community of students, motivates me to teach.  I also realize that we college professors are often woefully unprepared for the dynamics of the classroom.  My hope is to produce work that will encourages professors to take on as a life-long project the understanding of students and how to best teach them.

Professors - David & Daniel

Prof. David C. Pecoraro ~ Dr. Daniel de Roulet

Frequently Asked Questions:

Can a colleague or colleagues join a mentoring session?
No. We want to focus on the needs of one individual at a time. Moreover, it is a good confidentiality practice, which we take very seriously. 

Can I record the mentoring session?
Yes. 

What languages does your mentoring services provide?
At this time, we only offer the English language. If you have a translator available to you, we can work with them.

Do you offer small group or faculty-retreat / in-service mentoring?
Yes. The sessions include:

  1. A presentation on our most the most pressing needs for professors today.
  2. Guidance on creating action plans.
  3. Post-retreat / group evaluation of action plans.
  4. Optional individual post-retreat / group progress evaluation.

Group/faculty-retreat mentoring: $750. per half-day session; travel and lodging expenses; materials cost at $20 per participant; optional progress evaluations at $100. per participant

Contact Prof. Pecoraro for information about booking a group session. E-mail: david@studentcaring.com

Professional Mentoring Services for College Faculty

Direct download: pod_242.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:21am PDT
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As we pause for this American tradition and holiday known as Thanksgiving, we share what we are thankful for.

Wherever you are in world, we are thankful for your listenership and wish you all the best. 

Daniel & David

 

 

Direct download: pod_241.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:58am PDT
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As we prepare for our finals, we share some observations about what we see our students doing and offer tips for ways we professors can help them succeed. 

 

 

Direct download: pod_240.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:18pm PDT
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From our perspective, we share our thoughts (and ratings) on the popular rate my professors dot com website. 

Direct download: pod_239.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 6:18pm PDT
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Professors de Roulet and Pecoraro offer tips to help our students keep going when the going gets rough.

Direct download: pod_238.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 2:40pm PDT
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In this podcast about gossip and office politics, we share, analyze, and recommend a method of communication that minimizes conflict and promotes peace.

Direct download: pod_237.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:23pm PDT
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In this podcast we react to the work of Dr. Chip Espinoza and discuss how we are applying it in our classes.

 

 

Direct download: pod_236.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 12:41pm PDT
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In this, part 2 of self care for professors we talk about our transition from summertime to semestertime and what that means for our health. 

Direct download: pod_232.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 12:46pm PDT
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In this, podcast No. 229 we expose the many paper writing services who encourage our students to engage in plagiarism. 

Direct download: pod_229.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:33pm PDT
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In this podcast, Daniel and David discuss topics for you to think about as you begin your career in academe. 

Direct download: pod_225.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 1:22pm PDT
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Professors de Roulet and Pecoraro focus on "Course Organization and Management" in this podcast featuring our new Professional Mentoring Service for Professors.

Direct download: pod_220.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:59pm PDT
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Daniel and David share some commencement ceremony survival techniques in this podcast.

Direct download: sc_pod_218.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 2:08pm PDT
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David and Daniel discuss the benefits of teaching our students how to help each other.

 

 

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_207.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:31pm PDT
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SC 173 Helping Students Adjust to the New Prof. – YOU!

NOTES FROM THE STUDENT CARING PODCAST FOR PROFESSORS

 

 

How to help our students adjust to a new professor.

Your arrival at a new university might be very difficult for continuing students.
Student: “What do you mean professor Jones is gone?” “Who is this new professor anyways? I’m doomed, doomed I say, doomed.”
Moreover, we are the new professor at the beginning of every semester.

Our students are usually experiencing other new professors at the same time.

How we can help:

  • Acknowledge that they are experiencing a change and that can be difficult them.
  • Communicate up front with your students about your teaching style.
  • Install confidence in your students about the change of professors.
  • Our students learn subjects from us as the unique persons that we are.
  • Don’t judge yourself by how much the students miss the previous professor.
  • Recognize that our students will compare us to the previous professor.

Your purpose as a professor is not to be liked, it’s to connect with
those students who your naturally going to connect with
and also to connect with those students
who really need your help.

~~~~~

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_173.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 12:09pm PDT
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SC 172 Helping Student Athletes

NOTES FROM THE STUDENT CARING PODCAST FOR PROFESSORS

Helping Student Athletes | Student Caring

 

HELPING OUR STUDENTS WHO ARE IN SPORTS.

  • This can be a sore topic for some professors. We are here to help.
  • Unrealistic expectations:
    • Sports, in high school, are extremely important to parents. Sports can help with college admissions and scholarships.
    • College is about much more than just sports.
  • From a professors perspective:
    • We want our students to do well in all areas.
    • We don’t want our sports students to focus 100% on their sport at the expense of their education.
    • Your education is going to help you succeed in life.
    • Your educational goals are the most important ones during the college years.
  • Sports Students Strengths
    • Sports students understand teamwork.
    • Sports students have self discipline.
    • Sports students understand personal health.
  • Sports Students Concerns
    • Sports students may need to miss many classes to participate in their sport.
    • Sports students can surround themselves with just fellow sports students.

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All Podcasts via This Website

Click this Link to Subscribe via iTunes

Click this Link to Listen on Stitcher Smart Radio

Click this Link to Subscribe via Google Play

Click this Link to Subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed)

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_172.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 11:11am PDT
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SC 171 Teaching Students in the Arts

NOTES FROM THE STUDENT CARING PODCAST FOR PROFESSORS

Teaching Students in the Arts

 

HELPING OUR STUDENTS WHO ARE IN THE ARTS.

  • A concern… Sometimes students in the arts are not as concerned about straight academic work.
  • They may not see how their other classes can help them in life.
  • Students in the arts sometimes have complicated schedules.
  • Students will have periods of time, usually just before a performance, when they are 100% not focused on your class.
  • We can help them by being predicable with our course schedules.
  • If our students can let us know when they are performing, it will give us an an insight as to what they are experiencing during a particular week.
  • Arts students have a great deal of stress about graduating.
  • Arts students have transferable skills:
    • They can speak in front of an audience without passing out!
    • They can collaborate.
    • They can meet deadlines.
    • They have people and communication skills.
  • We can help these students by showing them how the subject that we are teaching can help them in the arts.
  • Skills in the arts do not always lead to a career in the arts.

 

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All Podcasts via This Website

Click this Link to Subscribe via iTunes

Click this Link to Listen on Stitcher Smart Radio

Click this Link to Subscribe via Google Play

Click this Link to Subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed)

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_171.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:48pm PDT
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SC 170 Helping Employed Students

NOTES FROM THE STUDENT CARING PODCAST FOR PROFESSORS

SC 170 Helping Employed Students

 

HELPING STUDENTS WHO ARE ALREADY EMPLOYED WHEN THEY ENTER COLLEGE.

  • Daniel knows of a full time student who is working 70 hours per week!
  • Ask your student, who may be having difficulties: “How much do you need to be working?”
  • We find that many students are working more than they need to. Delayed gratification is not easy for any of us.
  • Encourage your student to put their education near the top of their list of priorities.
  • Enlighten your students about income possibilities of a future job.
  • Encourage your students to look for work on campus.
  • Many employers are “college student friendly.”
  • The work schedule needs to be flexible – around the class schedule.
  • When our class schedule is predicable, it helps our students plan around work.

 

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

Click this Link to Subscribe via iTunes

Click this Link to Listen on Stitcher Smart Radio

Click this Link to Subscribe via Google Play

Click this Link to Subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed)

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

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SC 170 HELPING EMPLOYED STUDENTS

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.
The Caring Professor




The Caring Professor

 

Direct download: sc_pod_170.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:23pm PDT
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SC 169 Teaching International Students

NOTES FROM THE STUDENT CARING PODCAST FOR PROFESSORS

Teaching International Students

Our research and reference source for this podcast is from the University of Virginia: Strategies For Teaching International Students

CTE-Logo-Horiz-Color-Tagline-Web-Sized

GENERAL PRINCIPLES

  • Be explicit about your expectations and try to give examples or model what you are talking about.
  • Focus on meaning first and grammar and style later.
  • Stress fluency in communication along with correctness.
  • Try not to foster the student’s fear of errors.
  • Reinforce the student’s strengths while explaining what he/she still needs to work on.
  • Recognize that students may be differently acculturated to classroom situations.
  • Don’t assume that a student who looks “foreign” is an international student or that one who exhibits writing difficulties is necessarily a non-native speaker.

IN THE CLASSROOM:

When students make unclear remarks, paraphrase them before building on them (“so you are saying that . . .?”). This gives such students an opportunity to correct you if you have not understood what was meant; other students also understand the comment and so are less likely to ignore it. To avoid singling out international students, apply this technique to American students’ comments as well.

MAKE SURE STUDENTS UNDERSTAND DIRECTIONS AND ASSIGNMENTS.

Students from many cultures-and many individuals-believe it is polite to nod in response to someone’s words. When such a nod masks lack of comprehension, difficulties arise. If students have misunderstood previous directions, check with them individually after class about future assignments. Instead of asking, “Do you understand this assignment?” say, “Tell me what you need to do for Wednesday.” You can clarify directions for all students by having a volunteer rephrase them during class.

WRITE IT DOWN!

Use visual aids and write down key terms during lectures or while giving directions. This will help non-native speakers significantly with their comprehension of the material.

Let students who hesitate to speak in class contribute first in small groups or through electronic discussion groups on Instructional Toolkit.
For students who hesitate to speak on the spur of the moment, provide assignments or questions that the student can prepare beforehand. To avoid favoritism, you can give these assignments or questions to all students.

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

Click this Link to Subscribe via iTunes

Click this Link to Listen on Stitcher Smart Radio

Click this Link to Subscribe via Google Play

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_169.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:23am PDT
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SC 168 Teaching Students With Learning Disabilities

NOTES FROM THE STUDENT CARING PODCAST FOR PROFESSORS

SC 168 TEACHING STUDENTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES

Our research and reference source for this podcast is the Learning Disabilities Association of America

Student Caring

Legal Rights of College Students with LD

Academic accommodations are required by law for eligible college students with LD. Accommodations are changes in the learning and testing environments that give college students with LD an equal opportunity to learn. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and its amendments (ADAAA) require that reasonable accommodations be made available to college students who have current documentation of learning disabilities and who request learning and/or testing accommodations.

Student Responsibilities

Student responsibilities include the following:

  • To self-identify as a person with a disability to the disability services office at the college or university.
  • To provide up-to-date documentation of the disability to the disability services office.
  • To request academic accommodations that will insure access to information and testing on an equal level with students who do not have disabilities.
  • To self-identify to faculty as a student with a disability and provide them
    with a copy of the Individual Student Profile developed with the disability services office.
  • To remind faculty in a timely manner of academic accommodations required for tests and assignments.
  • To ultimately accept responsibility for his or her successful education. This includes maintaining satisfactory academic levels, attending classes, completing assignments, behaving appropriately, and communicating regularly with the appropriate office and/or individual regarding specific needs.

Faculty Responsibilities

If students request instructional and/or testing accommodations in a class, they must disclose the need for the accommodations to the instructor and give the instructor any documentation provided by the disability services office, typically a letter from that office validating the need for the specified accommodations. Students do not have to disclose their disabilities to their instructor, only the need for accommodations.

The instructors’ responsibilities include the following:

  • To allow students to disclose their disabilities in an appropriate and confidential place.
  • To acknowledge the rights of students with dignity and respect.
  • To maintain the integrity of academic standards.
  • To maintain student confidentiality at all times.
  • To provide reasonable instructional and/or testing accommodations.

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

Click this Link to Subscribe via iTunes

Click this Link to Listen on Stitcher Smart Radio

Click this Link to Subscribe via Google Play

Click this Link to Subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed)

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

###

SC 168 TEACHING STUDENTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.
The Caring Professor




The Caring Professor

Direct download: sc_pod_168.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 2:50pm PDT
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SC 167 Going to College for the First Time

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 167 Going to College for the First Time

We invite you to check out our appearances page.  We offer faculty presentations on the topics of "Student Caring" / "Student Success" and "Effective Teaching" New, this year is our presentation for parents of high school and college students, "What Professors Wish Parents Knew About College". We would love to visit you and your colleagues at your college.

 

Going to College for the First Time / Prof. Daniel de Roulet

Most of your education—especially the last four years—has been pointing to this moment.  But now what?  What should you expect from going away to college in the fall, and what can you do this summer to get ready?

1. Close the door on high school and focus on the future.  We know this isn’t easy.  You’re leaving behind friends, family, significant others, the familiarity of your home and your town/suburb/city—in some cases, country—to start a new life, and it’s hard to say goodbye.  On the other hand, there may be some advantages to leaving some of these things behind, and college is a good excuse to make the break.  We’re just saying.

There are few times when people have the opportunity to start life anew, even to reinvent themselves (on-line role-playing games excluded).  Are there things you didn’t like about your high school life?  Are there things you didn’t like about you in high school?  Have you been interested in areas you have never had the chance to try out?  Do you want to redefine your relationship with your parents?  Now’s your chance.

2. Learn as much as you can about your new environment.  Although nothing substitutes for actually living through a new experience, finding out about your new environment with soften the culture shock that many students feel at the beginning of college.  Get on line and see what you can find out about the college’s location and surrounding community, its campus, its students and activities, and your professors.  Get out your schedule of classes for the fall and try to find the buildings—get a sense for whether your walk from class to class will be one minute or fifteen.  Find you residence hall on the map and try to find some pictures of the rooms.  Visit your professors’ websites (most easily found through department websites) and see what their interests and expertise are.

3. Do some pre-course work.  Sometimes the first week of classes is a little overwhelming, especially in terms of finding out how much you’ll have to read and what your assignments will be. Find your course syllabi on-line, if they are available and up-to-date; see what books are required for your courses at the bookstore, especially paying attention to the edition of the textbook required.   If you find the syllabi, read them repeatedly, so that some of the information becomes second hand to you before your classes begin.  Consider buying the recommended edition of the book before you get to your college and do a little introductory skimming and reading.  You might get a good deal on the books, and you’ll avoid some long lines during the first week.

4. Begin to make a calendar for the year.  Once you obtain your course syllabi, note key exam and assignments dates—these notes will help you manage your time, decrease your number of surprises, and help you to decide how to best balance study and social events.  Also, write in important family and friend dates—birthdays, anniversaries, and the like.

A little work in the summer can make for a smoother transition in the fall.   And enjoy your summer—outside of work and thinking about college, find time to revel, rest, and recharge.

Recent high school graduates:  what concerns do you have about going to college?

 

~~~~~

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Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_167.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 5:38pm PDT
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SC 166 Integrated Teaching With the Field Trip

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

Teaching Techniques for Today’s Students
SC 166 Integrated Teaching With the Field Trip

Daniel shares how his sixth grade field trip influenced his life.

David’s research on the topic of our upcoming book, “What Professors Wish Parents Knew About College” reveled this quote:

One day she happened to sign up for a day trip from Scripps to Tijuana, Mexico, to help do some painting and other charitable work in an especially impoverished neighborhood. When she got there, she recalled, I held a baby who could barely breathe, and the mother didn’t have the money to take the baby to the doctor, and you could literally see the United States on the other side of the border. I was just blown away. The moment stayed with her, and during her sophomore year, she applied for a grant that would give her the funds necessary to live in Tijuana for the summer and work with indigent children there.
She got it.

Excerpt from: Bruni, Frank. “Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be.”

The field trip gives you an opportunity to make the message of the class very real.

Creating a college fiend trip that will maximize your students learning.

  • If there will be expenses involved, build those into the lab fee.
  • Find the best day in the semester for the field trip.
  • A field trip can create, for your students, significant learning experiences.
  • Utilize the resources, human and physical, available to you in your geographic area.

Daniel interviews David about his “Arts Day” – mega field trip experience.

  • Prepare your students for the field trip by educating them about the topic ahead of time.
  • Advertise the date of the field trip, well in advance.
  • Create a field trip that is highly educational and fun.
  • Think about logistical items:
    • Cost
    • Tickets
    • Transportation
    • Meals
    • Learning Goals and Materials.
  • Be prepared with a “PLAN B” for students who can’t make, or miss, the field trip.
  • Followup the field trip with an in-class assignment that maximized the experience.

 

~~~~~

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Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

###

SC 166 Integrated Teaching With the Field Trip

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.
The Caring Professor




The Caring Professor

Direct download: sc_pod_166.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:22am PDT
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SC 165 Teaching With Homework

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

Teaching Techniques for Today’s Students
SC 165 Teaching With Homework

Teaching With Homework

Ways we can improve teaching with homework.

  • Daniel asked his class: “Do you think differently because of your technology and social media? How do you manage your tasks?” Answer: “Our phones play a role in distracting us from concentrating on important tasks, like homework.”
  • Distraction, for our students, is the enemy of homework.
  • What can we do about this? Not much! It’s up to the student to develop their self discipline.
  • High School AP (Advanced Placement) programs are burning our students out before the get to us. Watch the film: RACE TO NOWHERE…  (Click on the picture below) Prepare to be disturbed.

Race to Nowhere Film

Homework Reading

  • Our students seem to want to do as little reading as possible.
  • David heavily integrates required (and graded) reading assignments into his courses.
  • Daniel will require his homework assignments to be hand written. This gets them off the computer and decreases their distraction level.

Isn’t this bizarre, that in this age of technology, we are finding ways for our students to not use it? – Dr. Daniel de Roulet

  • There is something, almost artistic when you are crafting the letters with your own hand vs. just typing them on the keyboard.
  • Make sure that you are giving the students feedback on their homework.
  • Impress on your students that they must buy the textbook – else, “You are dead-in-the-water before you begin.”
  • Daniel sees a lot of his students reading on their phones. This presents a variety of concerns about note-taking, comprehension, and distractions.

A lot of students who spend time on the their phones are complaining of loneliness.

How do we integrate homework into the day-to-day class meetings?

  • Require students to do the reading before the topic is discussed in class. Knowing that they will be involved in a discussion beforehand will prompt them to be prepared.
  • Accountability at the beginning of class is a good approach. (In the podcast version, listen to Daniel tell his story about “Standing Students!”

 

Homework is about fostering a continued learning experience outside of the class in their daily lives.

CARNEGIE RULE:  3 hours of work outside of class for every hour in class.

 

Next Week: The Field Trip

~~~~~

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Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_165.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:52pm PDT
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SC 164 Teaching in the Lab

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

Teaching Techniques for Today's Students
SC 164 Teaching in the Lab

SC 164 Teaching in the Lab

Teaching in the lab can be very different, depending on your discipline. Daniel teaches in a writing lab and David in the theater. In this podcast, we explore (lab) teaching techniques for today's students.

Lab facts:

  • An educational lab is given birth to when the course is designed and proposed.
  • Some courses have a lab requirement built in and for some, it is separate.
  • Often, a lab fee will be required when there are expendable materials required.

Lab teaching in a collaborative environment.

  • Colleagues will say to (Theater) David, "You can't teach that, they learn by doing."
  • Both can be achieved in carefully constructed labs and courses.
  • In a deadline driven environment, the student needs to learn under pressure.
  • When the professor and student are sitting side by side, the opportunities for collaboration increase.
  • Students get excited when they are put in charge of something.
  • DISADVANTAGE:  The pressure that comes with a deadline for a public performance can place me in the middle of making a decision that is either best for the student or best for the audience. My position is always: Our primary focus is on the student's learning, not the show. Our product (if we think that way) is the student who walks across the commencement stage, not the performance occurring on the stage. The theatre lab, including the performance, is a learning environment.
  • ADVANTAGE: Very quickly, when a student has a success, they experience a boost of self confidence.

"For a student, the classroom can be a lonely place." – Daniel

The lab: An opportunity for individual instruction and connection.

  • Look for ways you can encourage your students, one on one in the lab.
  • The demeanor of the professor in the lab is really important. More conversational gives the student an opportunity to express what's on their mind. Our students will see the lab as a safe place rather than a place where they feel like they have to perform.
  • If grading is involved in the lab, a syllabus needs to be in place.
  • The biggest advantage of the lab is one-on-one time with the professor. (Office hours seem to be a dying art!)

 

Next: Homework

~~~~~

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Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_164.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 4:29pm PDT
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SC 163 How to Lead a Good Discussion

Teaching Techniques for Today’s Students
SC 163 How to Lead a Good Discussion

 

In the syllabus for Prof. David Pecoraro’s classes:

Discussion is a valuable and inspiring means for revealing the diversity of opinion that lies just below the surface of almost any complex issue. Although there are many ways to learn, discussion is a particularly wonderful way to explore supposedly settled questions and to develop a fuller appreciation for the multiplicity of human experience and knowledge. To see a topic come alive (The emphasis is mine) as diverse and complex views multiply is one of the most powerful experiences we can have as learners and teachers. In a discussion where participants feel their views are valued and welcomed, it is impossible to ween class sessions. – Stephen D. Brookfield 

Difficulties that we encounter:

  • You have to know where your discussion will be going before you begin or the topic will wander.
  • Our students struggle with the lost art of conversation. Daniel recommends: Reclaiming Conversation by Sherry Turkle.9781594205552
  • Most of our students know how to speak, but not necessarily converse.

How can we prepare our students for a good discussion?

  • Prepare the students for the upcoming discussion by putting them into smaller groups and give them some questions to think about. Have them write down their answers. This is followed by an all class discussion.
  • Establish some ground rules that work for you.
    • When someone is talking, you can’t talk over them. (We are also teaching our students how to listen.)
    • Whatever your opinion is, it is safe to express. “Can we all agree to that?”
    • You may disagree with the professor as long as you articulate why you disagree.
    • Always support your opinions.
    • Everybody speaks once before anyone speaks a second time.
  • The professor can act as a secretary, one who does not comment, rather moderates.

Discussions can go bad when students are not prepared with the reading or topic.

  • You need to make sure they are prepared before the discusssion.
  • One way is to ask the student to leave if they have not done the reading. (You could have a time-out!)
  • Set up a discussion board on the course management system ahead of time.
  • A key to success: Write engaging questions.

How to close out a discussion.

  • At the end of a discussion, don’t end the class. End with a reflection on what has been discussed and learned. “How were your opinions challenged?” “What perspectives do you now have?” Ask your students to write their answers down for the beginning of the next class.

Professor preparation for a discussion.

  • Take some time to pre-determine outcomes:
    • Here is where I want the discussion to go.
    • Here are the 3 things I want them to cover.
    • I want my students to get to a certain point by the end of the discussion.

If you are new to discussion teaching – FEAR NOT. Just begin and continue to fine tune as you go forth.

 

~~~~~

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Next: Teaching in the lab.

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_163.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 4:45pm PDT
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SC 162 A Lecture for Today’s Students

Teaching Techniques for Today’s Students
SC 162 A Lecture for Today’s Students

Background

  • The students in our classrooms today are used to learning at a fast pace. This is evidenced by the speed that they multitask, text and learn via computers.
    • TED TALKS (Technology, Entertainment and Design) are a good example of this.
  • By November 2012, TED talks had been watched over one billion times worldwide. Not all TED talks are equally popular, however. Those given by academics tend to be watched more online, and art and design videos tend to be watched less than average. SOURCE
  • These lectures are short and entertaining. We think of these as lectures that are repackaged for the students we teach today.
  • Rethinking the Way College Students Are Taught  by Emily Hanford    It’s a typical scene: a few minutes before 11:00 on a Tuesday morning and about 200 sleepy-looking college students are taking their seats in a large lecture hall – chatting, laughing, calling out to each other across the aisles. Class begins with a big “shhhh” from the instructor.This is an introductory chemistry class at a state university. For the next hour and 15 minutes, the instructor will lecture and the students will take notes. By the end of class, the three large blackboards at the front of the room will be covered with equations and formulas.

    Students in this class say the instructor is one of the best lecturers in the department. Still, it’s not easy to sit through a long lecture, says student Jimmy Orr. “When it’s for an hour you kind of zone out for a little bit,” he says.

    Student Marly Dainton says she doesn’t think she’ll remember much from this class.

    “I’m going to put it to short-term memory,” she says. Once she takes the exam, Dainton expects she’ll forget a lot of what she learned.  SOURCE

  • OUR FEAR:  “How much will our students retain from our lectures?”
  • Students need to be reminded in different media; discussion, out of class work, and lectures, continuously.
  • Never do anything in a class for more than eight minutes without a change.

From our students perspective…

  • The attention span is not what it used to be.
  • More and more, we are in the age of multimedia.
  • Students are not necessarily taking notes when we lecture.

Constructing our lectures

  • We need to construct the class in such a way that the lecture is not the beginning and end of the information they need to learn – and communicate this to them, regularly.
  • Very carefully, come up with a plan which includes reading questions in preparation for the in class discussions and lectures. We need to get to them to that place of deeper learning.
  • In our culture, we do so much multi-media learning that merely peaks our interest (YouTubeNetflixAmazon TV) but doesn’t deepen our understanding.
  • The lecture needs to be constantly connected to what’s going on outside of class.

When you are lecturing, you need to get them involved. You are someone who is much more interesting than a text book!

  • How well are students paying attention to us during our lectures? If they are not paying attention during one part, it’s not their fault, it’s ours! Take notes after class and adjust accordingly.
  • TIP:  Analyze an excellent TED TALK and structure your lecture accordingly.
  • Humor is an excellent tool to regain their attention. It also humanizes you–again!
  • Sticking to your carefully planned class schedule doesn’t always create the deepest learning. Read the room and adjust according to the mental atmosphere of your students.

Next: A discussion on discussions.

~~~~~

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Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_162.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:36am PDT
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SC 161 Teaching Techniques for Today's Students

SC 161 Teaching Techniques for Today’s Students

~~~~~

Student Caring NEWS:

•  REMINDER:  Our book: The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching is on sale for only $12.99 (Digital)
•  Who is this book for?
Anyone looking to learn more about teaching in Higher Education.
Anyone who needs to improve their teaching evaluations.

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.
Caring-Prof-cover-Version-21
Download_on_iBooks_Badge_US-UK_110x40_090513
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downloadBox

The Directors of the Student Caring Project bring 50 years of combined classroom experience to offer new and experienced teachers ways to thrive in today’s college classroom. Pecoraro and de Roulet focus on understanding the needs and challenges of today’s students, tested methods of successful teaching and class triage, and trends in education. The goal of the book is a rewarding, effective and rigorous experience for students and professors alike.

The first section of the book, Teaching 101, looks at student-professor interactions, discussing:

  • The changing landscape of higher education and why many students feel disconnected from their educational experiences.
  • A brief outline of the expectations of students today compared to the expectations of professor’s university experiences.
  • A look at the financial landscapes that confront students and interfere with learning.
  • Academic preparedness.
  • The difficulties of teaching in a culture in which negotiation sometimes replaces hard work.
  • The importance of establishing clear and wise boundaries with students.
  • Establishing and keeping connections with students in the classroom during the semester to improve student learning.

Teaching 102 discusses putting together and nurturing successful courses based on a foundation of care for your students’ academic growth and well-being. Subjects include:

  • Intentionally setting the tone and establishing rapport instead of letting the frenetic first days of the term set the tone of a course.
  • Reinforcing tone and cementing expectations during the first course meetings.
  • The art of effective record keeping to track student progress.
  • Learning-goal-oriented course design, organization, and reflection.
  • Recognizing symptoms and causes of a class “going bad.” The need to carefully diagnose symptoms, understand student perceptions, and reactions, and see how the symptoms can negatively affect a class.
  • Changing the trajectory of a class that has gone off track. Strategies include responding early, checking in with students, not allowing the class to drift from its goals, and building a community of colleagues who are willing to discuss course remedies in confidence.
  • Ending a class well. Ways in which students can be actively involved in the end-of-term assessments of their knowledge, understanding, and skills. Preparing for a final course meeting that leaves students both clear about how the course’s goals have been met and confident in seeing how the skills of a particular academic discipline may be applied to their education.

Teaching 103 presents advanced strategies and background for addressing trends and difficult situations in education today, and for helping students succeed:

  • Classes that encourage critical thinking and introduce students to the expectations of college academic life.
  • The stages of intellectual development most students will experience, and how to appropriately move them along that continuum in preparation for college work and life beyond college.
  • Caring for students in online settings, addressing online learning’s additional challenges in knowing one’s audience, fostering community, and keeping a course on track.
  • Strategies for addressing difficult student encounters.
  • “Career Directions and Your Students’ Daily Bread” introduces students to the idea of a vocation, and discusses practical aspects of entering the work force, internships and apprenticeships, and graduate work.

 

GOOGLE Play
•  Now, for the first time, you can access our podcast via Google Play. Click to subscribe.

 Teaching Techniques for Today’s Students
– An introduction to the next five podcast topics:

  1. A lecture for today’s students
  2. How to lead a good discussion
  3. Teaching in the lab
  4. Using homework well
  5. How to manage a college field trip

 

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_161.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:23pm PDT
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SC 160 How to be a Happier Professor

SC 160 How to be a Happier Professor
Part Two of “Getting Behind” – Prevention
~~~~~

How We Can Avoid – Getting Behind:

•  Don’t answer immediately to a request for a commitment to your time. Take a day and think it over.
•  Watch out for those committee members who will assign you some work if you are not at the meeting.
•  Politely reserve the rights to your time.
•  Divide up those big piles of work into bite sized tasks.
•  Don’t try to grade all of those papers in one night!
•  Are you the type of person who feels that you work better under pressure? Be careful.
•  Viewing your upcoming week, at all times, can help you gauge your workload.
•  Sit down, once a month to take a look at the month ahead, you’ll feel more in control.
•  As a last resort, you can call in sick for a day! This can provide a much needed stress relief.

How much work do I need to do to fulfill this obligation?
•  Sometimes the amount of work you put in (comments on papers) can overwealm the student.
•  Keep the amount of work that you give people, manageable.
•  Do good work, but do reasonable amounts of work as well.

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_160.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:09am PDT
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SC 159 Getting Behind – Diagnosis and Prescription

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 159 Getting Behind – the Diagnosis and Prescription
~~~~~

Getting Behind – Diagnosis:

How can we identify when we are behind?
•  You know….   that dark feeling that comes over us when we realize that the papers are piling up.
•  The notion that we are just feeling overwhelmed and we are not sure what’s going on – dazed and confused.

TIP: Never lie to a judge when you are on jury duty. (Listen to David’s true story)

Reasons why professors can get behind.
• The rest of the university!  Those items that are not under our direct control.
• Over stuffing your syllabi to teach as much as possible.
• Saying “yes” to an additional commitment. “What was I thinking?

What can you do when you recognize that you are behind?
• Hit the pause button and take a mini retreat so you can identify your priorities.
• But, I don’t have time for a retreat! Bad sign. (You don’t want to discover yourself, looking between your feet at the cars behind you approach as you peer through the back window of the paramedic van.)
• In the David Allen book, “Getting Things Done,” he suggest doing a review, once a week.
• Sometimes we don’t want to clear our plates. After all, I am better at this than others and no, not me – I am not egotistic.
•  Ask yourself: Say, “Self, is the project really that important that I can’t give it to someone else?”
• And: “Is my teaching suffering because I am doing these other things?”
• Clear your schedule for the next three or four days.
• It is important to figure out how you got behind and put into place ways to prevent them in the future. – our next episode!

Direct download: sc_pod_159.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 12:56pm PDT
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SC 158 10 Surefire Ways to Piss Off Your Professor

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 158 10 Surefire Ways to Piss Off Your Professor

 

The number one selling higher education book on Amazon:

The Secrets of College Success / Second Edition / Lynn F. Jacobs & Jeremy S. Hyman

Secrets_2ndEd_Cover

 

http://www.thesecretsofcollegesuccess.com

10 Surefire Ways to Piss Off Your Professor

  1. Making excuses for missing class.
  2. Misbehaving in class.
  3. Challenging your professor publicly.
  4. Disputing a grade like a "mad dog."
  5. Seeming really stupid.
  6. Giving lame excuses for handing in a late paper or missing an exam.
  7. Treating the professor like your servant.
  8. Plagiarizing in super-obvious ways..
  9. Comparing your prof to other profs.
  10. Going over your prof's head.

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_158.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:04pm PDT
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SC 157 The 13 Warning Signs of a Bad Professor

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

The 13 Warning Signs of a Bad Professor
~~~~~

The number one selling higher education book on Amazon:

The Secrets of College Success / Second Edition / Lynn F. Jacobs & Jeremy S. Hyman

Secrets_2ndEd_Cover 

http://www.thesecretsofcollegesuccess.com

The 13 Warning Signs of a Bad Professor

  1. The professor is deadly boring.
  2. The professor is bummed out.
  3. The professor is condescending, combative, or full of him-or herself.
  4. The professor shows favoritism.
  5. The professor doesn’t give out a syllabus–or gives out a one-paragraph syllabus that is just the course description from the Web.
  6. The professor isn’t clear about the requirements and how much they count.
  7. The professor has incredibly petty rules.
  8. The professor can’t fill the whole class period.
  9. The professor seems unsure about the material.
  10. The professor presents the material in a confused or obscure way.
  11. The professor uses the class as a political platform.
  12. The professor never involves the students.
  13. The professor has no passion for the subject.

All Podcasts

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_157.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 1:08pm PDT
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SC 156 Nota Bene Student Attendance

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 156 Nota Bene Student Attendance
~~~~~

Trends in class attendance

  • When we were in college, people pretty much attended class.
  • Today, we do see a strong motivation on the part of our students to be diligent about class attendance.
  • You can also tell, how attendance at your college is going on any give day, by the amount of cars in the parking lot.

Best practices

  • Communicate and enforce the college attendance policy to your students.
  • If we are consistent about taking role, that will communicate that we are in fact, watching and keeping track.
  • "Has anyone seen Mike in a while?" Everyone will take note - that you are taking note.
  • Make sure that students have regular assignments to turn in when they come to class. They only get credit for the paper when they come to class. Our students need our help with the importance of attendance.
  • Class: "By the way, if you arrive 10 minutes late or leave early, that counts as an absence." Everyone will get very quiet.
  • Make sure that your syllabus is not all "BARK."
  • We have a duty to make class engaging and interesting.
  • When a student misses our class and they contact us, we need to hold them accountable for the missed work. Don't enable the student by making it easy for them.

A colleagues approach - Lisa Alvarez

  • "I'm concerned about you because I think you are failing my class."
  • "I'm glad you came to see me today, but I have to tell you, I need to be fare to everyone in the class."

Ask yourself: Are you making them a better student or are you preparing them to be a better bad student?

 

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

 

Direct download: sc_pod_156.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 5:55pm PDT
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SC 155 No.4  What Your Students Probably Don't Know

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

Syllabus – Part Four
~~~~~

Office hours

  • We find that students are communicating with us via emails instead of coming into our offices.
  • We need to let our students know what “Office Hours” actually are and what they are for.
  • Help your students by telling them specifically where your office is located.
  • We invite you to join us with our new service for students:  “One Minute Office Hour

College services available to students

  • Even though our students have access to the resources available, they often forget or do not know where to go for help.
  • It can be helpful for us to verbally explain to our students what the health center can and can not do for them.
  • Tell them what type of services the on campus police department has to offer.

Digital technology

  • Explain to your students how crucial it is that the regularly check their college email address. We should not assume that they are all aware of this.
  • Freshmen may need extra help accessing the course management system.

Please join us next week for section number four in the syllabus series.

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_155.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 11:14am PDT
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SC 154 No.3  What Your Students Probably Don't Know

Syllabus – Part Three
~~~~~

Open syllabus syllabus quiz

  • Daniel gives the “Open Syllabus Syllabus Quiz” A.K.A.: OSSQ to his class to encourage them to think about why they are there and what the learning process will be.

Sequence of assignments.

  • A chronological listing of each assignment, what the topic will be, and how it will be assessed.
  • Without a list of what the assignments are, there will be anxiety and confusion, both for the students and the professor.

Grades

  • Often, our students do not know what grades they have received and how they are doing in your class.
  • A syllabus needs to list what the assignments are and how they are weighted on day one.
  • We want our students to manage their own grades.

Late assignment policies

  • If students don’t know what your policies are regarding late work this will create many, many questions.
  • Spell out your policy: Assignments are not accepted late. Assignments may be turned in before the deadline.
  • A student may assume that your policies are just like those in another class.

Please join us next week for section number four in the syllabus series.

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_154.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:36am PDT
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SC 153 No. 2  What Your Students Probably Don't Know

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

Syllabus – Part Two
Rules for Learning

Class attendance

  • Communicate to your students that the class is a community and their attendance is essential to form a learning community. Your fellow students will need to work harder if you are not in class.
  • Policy: If the student misses more than 8 hours of instruction, the instructor drops them from the course.
  • Arriving late or leaving early is a tardy. 3 tardies equal 1 absence.

Meaningful class participation

  • Just “showing up” doesn’t mean that you are attending the class.
  • You need to come to class prepared for all in class discussions and activities.
  • If you do not come prepared to class, you may be dismissed for the day.
  • We want our students to be active not passive learners.

Academic dishonesty

  • BE ADVISED:  There are many online resources for students who want to purchase assignments.
  • You can try, but you can’t buy learning.
  • List the academic policy of the college.
  • Explain to your students that you will report any instance of academic dishonesty.
  • Reference: How To Cheat In College and What to do About It

 

 

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_153.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:30am PDT
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SC 152 No. 1 What Your Students Probably Don't Know

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

 

Book recommendation from Dr. Daniel de Roulet

Adulting: How to Become a Grown-up in 468 Easy(ish) Steps

510VK8Q1dbL._SX328_BO1,204,203,200_

 

  • Young adults today don’t seem to be launching all that well.
  • We see this every day in our classrooms.
  • We make assumptions about what our students know about college.

How to help our students understand some essential information in the course syllabus.

  • How we address the syllabus on day one is key.
  • When the answer a student asks us verbally, is on the syllabus, we need to refer them to that document instead of answering it for them. We want them to look at the syllabus often and use it as an essential resource.

Ways we can help our students know and understand what is on the syllabus.

  • The syllabus quiz. If you don’t pass, the quiz, you are dropped from the course.
  • Reading the syllabus to the class. (We do not recommend this.)

Your email address

  • This is essential.
  • Let your students know the best way they can reach you.

Office hours

  • We don’t see that students actually know what “office hours” are.
  • It is rare for our students to utilize our office hours. (This is one reason why we created the “One Minute Office Hour.”
  • Write a clear statement about why and when you have office hours.

What is a syllabus?

  • Our students may not know what a syllabus is.
  • For reasons not known to us, students avoid reading this document.
  • In writing, and verbally, we need to tell our students why the syllabus is important.
  • If we focus on the importance of the syllabus in relationship to their grade, we can get their attention.

What is this course?

  • Explain to your class what the course is about, they might not understand past, “I just know that I have to take this course.”
  • We find that our students walk into our class on the first day and that’s when they begin to figure out what the course is about.
  • We need to think about our class, what we know and also understand what our students don’t know.

Key dates

  • Give your students essential and important dates.
  • Tell your students to put these down in their daily planners.
  • Tell your students to buy and use a daily planner or refer them to this video.

 

Course materiels 

  • Students, for a variety of reasons do not get all of the required course materials.
  • Tell your students what it means to have a book on reserve in the library.
  • Students tend to spend as little money as possible on the text book. Often this is a disaster.
  • Access to the online course management system and access to a printer is essential.
  • It is good idea for our students to buy a folder for each class and put all information in them.
  • It is in your best interest to purchase a day-timer and use it daily.

 We wish for you all, good first weeks of instruction.

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_152.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 5:34pm PDT
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SC 151 New Year Resolutions for Professors

SC 151 New Year Resolutions for Professors

 

Professor New Year Resolution #1: Learn how to learn all my students names.

  • Hey, you there in the third row – go ahead!
  • We find seating charts to be really helpful.
  • Many group assignments requiring students to say their names as they present is helpful as we hear their names repeatedly.

Professor New Year Resolution #2: Don’t fall behind in my grading.

  • Daniel practices the “Grade 5 papers a day” method.
  • Relative calm and order prevail when we don’t procrastinate.

Professor New Year Resolution #3: Eat healthier and drink less coffee.

  • We are unified in our resolve to ignore the ‘less coffee’ portion of this tip.
  • Why is it so difficulty for us to eat and drink what is good for us? Stress?

Professor New Year Resolution #4: Don’t say ‘yes’ to all potential committee assignment requests.

  • This can be difficult due to our commitment to shared governance.
  • If we do to much on this side of life, our teaching can suffer.
  • Decide where you can be most effective.

Professor New Year Resolution #5: Spend less time on the Internet

  • Our is not a thinking profession at all, is it?
  • The Internet can be a huge distraction for us and rob us of precious productive time.

Professor New Year Resolution #6: Don’t check email 20 times a day!

  • Why do we do this? We don’t want to miss anything!
  • Our students check their email – constantly.
  • Students and colleagues ask: “Did you get my email?”

Professor New Year Resolution #7: Improve my professorial wardrobe.

  • Do you dress like a professor? (We are not always successful in this area.)
  • At least, for the benefit of our students, look like a professor, it really matters.

We invite you to join us in 2016 and beyond by sharing your work with the international Student Caring community.

Opportunities for you join us:

  • Write a guest blog post about…
    • Your research
    • Something you are passionate about
    • Something you want to share with students, professors, or parents.

Announcing the debut of the “One Minute Office Hour“ on January 1, 2016.

Please – share this with all college students in your world, it would really mean a lot to us as we seek to help more and more students succeed in college.

One Minute Office Hour LogoStudents who most often do not come into our offices during our office hours could benefit from a one minute (TED TALK style) video that they could access on their smart phones or computers.

  • We welcome your contributions to this video cast, publishing every Friday.
  • To participate, email david@studentcaring.com and he will get back to you with participation details.
  • Have you always had something that you wanted to share with all college students? What are you known for? Here’s your chance to tell the world.

 

If you are interested in being a guest to this podcast, just let us know!

We are continuing our research for book #2: What Professors Wish Parents Knew About College.

If you are interested in being interviewed for this book, please let us know.
David is researching this book during his sabbatical leave, spring of 2016.

 

 We wish for you all, a Happy New Year!

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_151.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:04am PDT
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SC 150 The Christmas Episode
Merry Christmas & Happy Holidays from Student Caring


Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 150 The Christmas Episode

 

We celebrate podcast 150 on Christmas Day, 2015!

We invite you to join us in 2016 and beyond by sharing your work with the international Student Caring community.

Opportunities for you join us:

  • Write a guest blog post about...
    • Your research
    • Something you are passionate about
    • Something you want to share with students, professors, or parents.

Announcing the debut of the "One Minute Office Hour" on January 1, 2016.

One Minute Office Hour LogoStudents who most often do not come into our offices during our office hours could benefit from a one minute (TED TALK style) video that they could access on their smart phones or computers.

  • We welcome your contributions to this video cast, publishing every Friday.
  • To participate, email david@studentcaring.com and he will get back to you with participation details.
  • Have you always had something that you wanted to share with all college students? What are you known for? Here's your chance to tell the world.

 

If you are interested in being a guest to this podcast, just let us know!

We are continuing our research for book #2: What Professors Wish Parents Knew About College.

If you are interested in being interviewed for this book, please let us know.
David is researching this book during his sabbatical leave, spring of 2016.

 

 We wish for you all, a wonderful Christmas & Holiday break!

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Next week: Episode #150! The Christmas Episode

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_150.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:47am PDT
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SC 149 The Grade Challenge

Have you heard these comments?

STUDENT: There's no way I got that grade!

STUDENT: I am not quite sure I know how I did in the course, I just want to get a better grade. 

This line of thought is usually followed by an attempt at a grade negotiation with the prof.

 

Tips for professors:

  • Keep a good grade book.
  • All along the way, remind your students to check their grades.
  • Stand firm when communicating during a grade dispute.
  • From the first assignment, our grading approach lays the foundation for the final grade.
  • Students may ask: "Is there anything I can do to improve my grade?"
    • All too often, we hear this question.
    • To accommodate this, it should be a terrific reason.
    • Every time we make a choice, it sets the standard for all current and future students.
  • Your student may not approach you directly and go over your head.
    • When this occurs, your chair or dean should refer them back to you.
    • The professor has the knowledge and control of the grading.
    • After the initial conversation, if the student still wants to pursue a grade change we refer them to the college policy. You are not under any obligation to continue to discuss the matter.
  • We are often challenged during these difficult situations with students.
  • The grade earned could be end of their college career.
  • This moment of truth could place them on academic probation.
  • We need to to the best that we possibly can to write exams that are fair and tell us what we need to know about the students progress.
  • Don't second guess your decision to the student, this can communicate that you are not certain about what you are doing.

 

 We wish for you all, a wonderful holiday break!

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Next week: Episode #150! The Christmas Episode

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_149.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:38am PDT
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SC 148 The Office Party

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 148 The Office Party

 

Tips for the party planners:

  • Your attendees will be comparing your party to previous parties.
  • Employees will draw conclusions, “Oh, we must be cutting back on the expenses.” “Oh, if we can afford to spend money like this, what about my real needs a professor, what about an increase in salary?”
  • Know that every party sets an expectation level.
  • Don’t recognize employees for years of service with small meaningles trinkets. It is better to simply give a certificate.

Tips for party goers:

  • If you are participating in a gift exchange, select your gift wisely. You don’t want to embarrass anyone.
  • An office party is not a party with friends. It is a professional party.
  • Whatever you do at the office party will be remembered for years.
  • How do you dress for the office party?
    • Dress better than your usual day to day attire.
    • Perhaps a holiday tie?
    • Women will want to proceed with caution, this is not a cocktail party.
  • Don’t talk about work! That really puts a damper on a holiday party atmosphere.
  • Don’t be a pig! This is the time for you to demonstrate your best social skills.
  • All things in moderation. If you drink, be very cautious about your alcohol intake.
  • Remember, most everyone has a camera in their pocket or purse these days. You don’t want your embarrassing behavior to end up on the Internet.
  • Remember, if you bring a guest, their behavior will reflect on you. How much of your personal life do you want to share with your colleagues?
  • Relax, but be professional and dignified.

 

 We wish for you all,  wonderful office parties!

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Next week: When a student challenges your grade.

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Professors - David & Daniel

 

Direct download: sc_pod_148.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 4:42pm PDT
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SC 147 Finals Week

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 147 Finals Week

 

How we can help our students during finals week.

  • We can be positive and not let our (perhaps) our true feelings about how we are feeling become known.
  • Resist the urge to pack in as much materiel as we can. Our students are not in a strong learning mode at this time of the semester.

How we can help ourselves during finals week.

  • Do we make less comments when grading finals? Yes. Grade them well, but know that students don't usually pick them up.
  • We are grading, end of the year assessments rather than providing comments for improvement.
  • David paces his finals grading to meet rather than beat the grade submission deadline.
  • Daniel advises that we get enough sleep so we can be rested for our grading tasks.
  • Consider a faculty grading party at a fun location.

 We wish for you all, a very good final week of the semester!

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Professors - David & Daniel

 

Direct download: sc_pod_147.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:50pm PDT
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SC 146 How to Talk About World Events in Class

SC 146 How to Talk About World Events in Class

Responding to terror in France

How we can help our students process significant world events.

  • Give your students a question to write about in class and follow it up with a moderated group discussion.
  • Ask your students to take a position and write about it. The purpose of the assignment is not to improve their writing, but to get them to talk about it.
  • Discussion rules are established:
    • Only one student may speak at a time.
    • No one is allowed to interrupt anyone else.
    • You have to be called upon to speak.
    • No one is allowed to react to anyone else opinion.
  • We are teaching them how to have academic conversations.
  • We want to create a safe place in our classrooms where students can speak their minds. Where else in our society today can we safely do that?
  • Our students tend to be socially connected with each other, but not as much with global issues.

Our hearts go out the people of France.

 We want to encourage our students not to give into the fear.
We have life experiences to offer students.

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Professors - David & Daniel

 

Direct download: sc_pod_146.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:28am PDT
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SC 145 STOP!  STOP!   STOP!

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 145 STOP! STOP! STOP!

 

Take a Christmas or holiday break.

Avoiding professorial burnout.

  • Daniel went on strike last weekend! He took a weekend off which resulted in a good Monday morning.
  • NOTE: This is not for you if you don’t have any problems stopping for the break.
  • Are you looking forward to the holiday break so you can get ready for next semester?
  • You (Yes YOU!) need to take a break from being a professor.

How can we achieve this?

  • Distance yourself from the elements of your work. Perhaps that is a laptop computer?
  • Any activity other than working as a professor will give you a rest.
  • Eliminate that worry about the first day of classes by preparing between now and the end of finals week.
  • Think about what you will want to accomplish, non work-wise, over your holiday break. Plan some activities that don’t involve using your head.
  • A change in environment can help you to disconnect from work.
  • Do not go to your campus!
  • Go to a place where there is no Internet.
  • TIP:  You might not want to tell your colleagues, during finals week: “I am 100% ready for the first day of classes!”

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Professors - David & Daniel

Direct download: sc_pod_145.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 2:35pm PDT
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SC 144 Student Centered Teaching

SC 144 Student Centered Teaching

As we record this the Santa Ana winds are blowing in Southern California.
Daniel recommends the writings of Joan Didian The Santa Anas.

STUDENT CARING MOMENT

Helping students with their stress:

  • Students are usually trying to solve many problems at once. Talk them through their situations one-by-one. When the situations are broken down into individual moments, it can help them to manage their stress.
  • Worrying is helpful in small doses but honestly, would it help?

Teaching Styles

Student centered teaching

  • This doesn’t have to be all or nothing, we can blend our teaching styles to provide variety in the classroom.
  • Often, Daniel will teach two-thirds of class in lecture mode, then switch to a student guided activity for the remainder of the class.
  • We can orchestrate a reversal of roles where the student is now the teacher. As we well know, you have to know a topic really well before you attempt to teach it to others.
  • We can place students in charge by assigning them a topic to present that will enhance the learning experience for all students. Now, “The Sage on the Stage” is the student and not the professor.
  • This approach brings the students work into the spotlight as they show us how much they are learning. These presentations, when done well, result in the student feeling very proud of their work.
  • This method of teaching will tell you more about what they learning than a final exam.
  • When your students are presenting, lack of engagement is not an option.

 

We move from being the “Sage on the Stage” to the “Guide on the Side.”

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Professors - David & Daniel

 

Direct download: sc_pod_144.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:29pm PDT
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SC 143 Teaching Styles: Teacher or Student Centered?

NEWS / Watch for our podcast on the new Google Play network. Coming soon!

STUDENT CARING MOMENT

Stay in touch with your former students. We find that Facebook can help us to be available to our students who want to share their life experiences with us.

Our former student can provide a perspective of what life is like after college to current students.

Teaching Styles

Teacher centered approach

  • Often thought of as "Old School"
  • The professor lectures, the students listen and take notes.
  • The teach is the formal authority and expert.

Student centered approach

  • Inquiry based learning
  • The teacher is working more as a coach or facilitator.
  • The teacher is seen as the more experienced learner among peers.

We use a combination of these two styles.

  • We remember "The Sage on the Stage" and overhead projectors!
  • Our professors were usually the ones who wrote the textbook we were learning from.
  • There is high value to a person who is an expert and who writes text books.
  • Lecturing for 18 weeks can be sure fire way to put your students to sleep.
  • At some point, the professor needs to be the expert in the classroom.
  • A variety in teaching styles can be achieved with a variety courses with a four-year program.

Length of class time dictates that we vary our teaching styles.

  • A five hour course necessitates a very different style of teaching than a 50 minute course.
  • Students nowadays have less tolerance for an all lecture class.
  • Our students are living in a world where the get information in little bits. They are also living in a world where information comes to them on screens.
  • Breaking up your lecture with multi-media helps communicate a point and keep the students attention.
  • Giving our students a chance to interact with each other takes them to the next level of learning. Daniel: " I want to see them processing the information."
  • When all students present information, they are exposed to many opinions about a topic.

One of the most important things we can do as professors to ask a very good and thought provoking questions.

The question, as you might imagine, provoked a lively conversation where the students were all engaged in the topic. I am careful to not share my opinion on a topic, rather to seek out their opinions.

What are you experiences with these teaching styles?

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Professors - David & Daniel

 

Direct download: sc_pod_143.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:45pm PDT
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SC 142 Violence on College Campuses

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 142 Violence on College Campuses

 

IN THE NEWS / USA TODAY:  Fatal Tenn. campus shooting started over dice game.

Unfortunately, campus violence is nothing new, in fact it has become the current version of “Going Postal.”

How are professors and students reacting to violence on campus?

  • Before and immediately after 911 airplanes were targets, today the targets are places of learning, our places of business.
  • These incidences, though few and far between, have become regular and are often in the back of our mind.
  • On college tours, we now hear, all the time, parents asking: “How safe is your campus?” “What do your campus police reports show?” “What do you have in place to respond to an active shooter?”
  • We are at a disadvantage due to the open nature of a college campus.

How does this affect us as professors?

  • Knowing that our classroom doors can now be locked from the inside plants the thought: “What will I do if an active shooter is on my campus?”
  • You can imagine that our students and their parents are also thinking about violence on our campuses.
  • After a shooting, faculty are thinking: “I’m looking at my students differently.”
  • When we are thinking about the possibility of violence in our classroom, we are not 100% focused on our teaching. On the other side of the lectern, our students are not 100% thinking about learning.
  • Education needs to happen in a safe place, in an environment without distraction.

How colleges are trying to cope with this.

  • Daniel: “I have made a conscious effort, not to have my teaching style change.” “I will not give into this notion of fear.”
  • A professor at Daniel’s college set up a memorial for the victims of the shooting in Oregon. This allowed the community an opportunity to express their fears, concerns, and emotions about the incident.
  • One of the things that we professors are good at is having rational conversations about difficult topics.
  • We can lead our campuses and classrooms in conversations about this topic, which moves everyone toward not “bottling up” their emotions.

After a campus shooting:

  • Our students hear the news and become more fearful.
  • Parents are now concerned more than before. “I am going to send my college kid a text to make sure they are okay.”
  • Colleges remind everyone about the procedures that they have in place for an active shooter.

How can we help our students when a shooting occurs?

  • We can educate our students about the facts and statistics of violence on college campuses. “You know, these are extremely isolated incidences.”
  • We don’t want to treat these horrible situations like: “This is what is happening everywhere all the time.”
  • We can speak and write our opinions about the violence and encourage our students to do the same.
  • We need to brainstorm and develop solutions to these problems.
  • How do we want our campuses to look in 5 years?
  • We can teach civility, conflict resolution, and mediation.

 

“My college years were the best years of my life.” – Let’s not lose that.

 

What are you experiencing as a result of violence on our campuses?

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We welcome your feedback to our work.
What are you struggling with?
How many days until a holiday break?
Have you submitted your text book requests for next semester?

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_142.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:36pm PDT
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SC 141 #2. Creating Caring Moments

This podcast continues with our conversation on student caring moments.


Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 141 #2. Creating Caring Moments

1:  A group project is not going well because one student is not doing their job.

  • Our temptation is to put the responsibility on the group.
    • The students will learn as a result of peer-pressure. It's not true.
    • It is our responsibility to sit down with that student and explain that their performance is not acceptable.
    • The student needs to know that they have a responsibility to the group. This of course can be viewed as a rehearsal for a professional work environment.
    • Our tone with the student is very important. We want to encourage, teach, and set a high standard.

 

2:  How can we add some stress-relief to the student experience?

  • Build in to the class schedule:
    • "Class today in the local coffee shop!" A great opportunity to teach and connect with your students.
  • Class: "Can we have class outside today?" - Yes!
  • Build into your class schedule a surprise.
    • Plan an activity that not exceptional, then surprise them by announcing that you are replacing the activity with one that is exceptional.
  • You can remove a reading assignment from the schedule to give them a break in the middle of the semester.

 

Please join us next week. 😎

 

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We welcome your feedback to our work.
What are you struggling with?
How many days until a holiday break?

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Professors - David & Daniel

 

Direct download: sc_pod_141.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:56pm PDT
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SC 140 #1. Creating Caring Moments

A student has a tragedy in their life. How can we maintain academic rigor while also showing them that we care?

Student Caring Moment

Source:  The Millennial Generation:Who Cares?  Patricia M. Carey, Assistant Provost for Scholarship Initiatives, New York University

STUDENT: Don’t my professors know how hard this work is? I’m paying their salaries and they should be helping me. Just wait until my professor sees my evaluation of him on ratemyprofessor.com, I’ll show him! That’s anger at having to put effort into earning the “A” that he/she thinks they deserve.

Our opinions:

  • This is a result of a basic misunderstanding of what our job is.
  • Students often mistake professors as tutors.
  • As professors, we teach to the whole class. This is not one on one education.
  • We can learn a lot about this generation by reading comments on ratemyprofessors.com

Small Powerful Moments of Caring

1:  A student receives a poor grade on a test and they come to speak with you about it.

  • Our words are important but not as important as our tone of voice when we speak with them.
  • We want to make it clear that what we are going to talk about is the student learning, not a grade negotiation.
  • This is a teaching opportunity to help the student learn how to do better in all of their classes.

 

2:  A student has a tragedy in their life. How can we maintain academic rigor while also showing them that we care?

  • You want to show sympathy to the student but you cannot bend the rules.
  • These conversations work best in person instead of an email.

 

Please join us next week as we continue with this conversation.

 

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We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_140.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:05am PDT
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SC 139 Kidney Stones - STRESSED OUT!

Notes from Podcast #139

Kidney Stones – STRESSED OUT!

Student Caring Moment

Daniel tells a story about a student who was late to class because of kidney stones.

Managing Stress in Higher Education

What happens when a carefully planned semester goes awry because you become sick?
How can we recover from being a week behind?

  • Future classes can be adjusted while maintaining the goals for the class.
  • You can build into your class schedule several days that are extra sessions where you can provide additional information – or not.

Knowing human nature, we suspect our students rejoice when they find out that we are sick! NO CLASS – YEAH!

 

Colleagues can stress us out. NO!  (Yes)
When a colleague is stressed out and unhappy, they can cause us to feel the same way. How can we manage that?

  • Often, we can do nothing about an unhappy and stressed out colleague.
  • Abraham Lincoln remarked on this: “Most folks are as happy as they make up their minds to be.”
  • Do not be drawn into your colleagues moods and emotions.

Yes, there are people who will go out of their way to make other people unhappy which is usually as a result of their own unhappiness. Remember why you are doing what you are doing and don’t be dependent on others being happy for your happiness.

Our universities can stress us out by adding more to our already full plates.

  • Weighing the value of what you are asked to do against the value of the education you are providing to your students is a good criterion to follow.  “If I spend my time fulfilling this request, will my students benefit?” No. “No, I am not going to do that.” The student must remain the focus of our best time and energies.

We live in Orange County California where most people are stressed out by over packing our schedules. (Not to mention the freeway system.)

Building time into your schedule for things to go wrong or just non committed time can help to relieve stress.

A review of your calendar of activities over the past 3 months can reveal patterns of time management that you might not have been aware of.

 

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We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_139.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 4:15pm PDT
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SC 138 Stress Management Help for Professors

Notes from Podcast #138

Stress Management Help for Professors

Student Caring Moment

David tells a story about a student who had particulary difficult and stressful learning experience.

Our opinions:

  • People may look at a student during a time when they are struggling and think, "This student is never going to make it."
  • We, as professors, in the interest of keeping a project moving forward, may make the wrong decision about a student.
  • Our students tend to never forget defining moments during their college years with us.
  • Stress can occur when we have to make a difficult decision about the education of one of our students. During defining moments, we must seek to encourage rather than discourage a student.
  • When do our students deal with stress?  ALL THE TIME!

Stress Management Help for Professors

How we control stress or how we allow it control us is the key to surviving in higher education.

What can we do relieve our stress?

  • Professor stress relief: Daniel -  "Find your own private place on campus to escape to. Stressful situations always demand that thing be fixed now, but we know they can't be."
  • Professor stress relief: It is important to be able to recognize when you are under extreme stress. 
  • Professor stress relief: David - "Find somebody to help." This positive action can offset the negative emotions that are causing you stress." Plan "B" - Take a walk.

 

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We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_138.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:55am PDT
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SC 137 Explaining What You Do For A Living

Explaining What You Do For A Living

Student Caring Moment

The family vacation.
Student: Professor, I just wanted to let you know that my family planned a vacation and I have to go.

Our opinions:

  • Parents may be used to pulling their kids from elementary and high school for a vacation.
  • Remember, the student did not plan this.
  • This is an opportunity for us to speak to the student about how they can talk to their parents.
  • Explain to them that a college class is like a job.
  • It is good to think about this as an educational moment rather than just a breaking of the rules.

Explaining What Do You Do For A Living

It is not uncommon for a person who isn't familiar with what a professor does to be influenced by what they have seen in the media.

Oh, you're a professor like the guy in Gilligan's Island!

Negative stories in the news can also influence society about what we do.

How can we help them to understand?

  • We can inquire about family members that they might have in college, then offer to be of assistance. Show them, by teaching them what you do for students.
  • Explain what it really means is that you have expertise in a certain area. Just as they have expertise in areas that you don't know anything about.
  • Explain that you are a full time trainer for people who want to go into certain areas.

Oh, your tenured! How interesting!
How can we explain what being tenure means?

  • Being tenured often means that you now have more work. In part, that's what it means!
  • Our committee work often consumes a large percentage of our time.
Direct download: sc_pod_137.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 1:18pm PDT
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SC 136 What Do You Do For A Living?

Notes from Podcast #136

Student Caring Moment

The bookstore ordered all the wrong books for your class and the students have already purchased them! The students, on the first day of your class are very angry. "What are you going to do about it?" "We want you to refund our money!"

Our opinions:

  • It is a great sign that the student bought the books!
  • The students assumed that the mistake was the professors. Not good.
  • It is always best to personally go the bookstore to be certain that your book orders are correct and on the shelf.
  • Be caring and proactive while addressing the problem with your students.

What Do You Do For A Living?

Refer your friends and family members to this podcast who don't understand what you do.

You are on a long flight and the person and you decide to be sociable with the person sitting next to you. Often, each party asks: "What do you do for a living?" In this podcast, we explore some tactics and tips to replace their assumptions about the world of professors with good information.

They may be thinking:

  • Isn't it your fault that the cost of higher education is out of control?
  • Ah, ha! It's his fault that so many people can't read and write!
  • The unemployment rate is high, why aren't you doing your job?

The conversations might go something like this...

YOU SAY: I’m a professor. (This is Daniel)
THEY SAY: Oh, what do you teach? (Because they want to know)
YOU SAY: I teach English.
THEY ARE THINKING: My grammar is lousy - this guy is going think I don’t know how to write.

OR THIS SCENARIO (David get’s this often)
So, what do you do?
YOU SAY: I’m a professor.
THEY SAY: Oh, what do you teach? (Because they want to know)
YOU SAY: I teach Theatre.
THEY ARE THINKING: Easy job.
THEY SAY: Oh, that sounds like fun.


YOU SAY: I’m a professor.
THEY ARE THINKING: Nice, this guy get’s 3 months off every summer.

  • David: Summer breaks for me are times when I do different work.
  • Daniel: I need to say current in my field. I update my classes, a task that I only have time for in the summer.

YOU SAY: I’m a professor.
THEY ARE THINKING: He’s the kind of guy who makes classes hard for my son.


YOU SAY: I’m a professor.
THEY ARE THINKING: It was a professor who failed me in that math class - I hate all professors!

YOU SAY: I’m a professor.
THEY SAY: What classes do you teach?
YOU ANSWER: Math 101, Data Analysis, and Statistics
THEY ARE THINKING: Only 3 classes - overpaid teacher - no wonder higher ed costs are sky high!

YOU SAY: I’m a professor.
THEY ARE THINKING: Well, isn’t that special, I’ll bet he thinks he’s smarter than me!

YOU SAY: I’m a professor.
THEY ARE THINKING: Oh, like the guy in the white coat on Gilligan’s Island.

Join us next week for part two of this topic.

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We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_136.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 5:58pm PDT
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SC 135 Grade Appeals

Grade Appeals
Managing Your Grade Book
Notes from Podcast #135

THE GRADING SERIES

Podcast # 132 / More Efficient Grading
Podcast # 133 / Good Feedback on Student Work
Podcast # 134 / Coordinating Class Assignments to Manage Your Workload
Podcast # 135 / Grade Appeals and Managing Your Grade Book

Student Caring Moment

How can we get to know our new students? 

What we do:

  • Daniel uses a survey with these questions.
    • Tell me something about yourself that will help me to distinguish you from the other students.
    • What is the most recent movie you've seen or the most recent book that you've read?
    • ...and your taking this class because?
  • Student reactions: "Wow, my professor actually wants to know something about me!"
  • David assigns a project to the class where they beak into groups to create a three-dimensional sculpture.
    • Each students contributes an object that is representative of who they are.
    • In the second class, they present their work to the class which gives not only the professor, but everyone in the class a sense of who they are as individuals.

Grade Appeals

  • Daniel is experiencing a number of grade appeals where the students wanted an "A" instead of the earned "B".
  • We must have evidence of why a specific grade was issued.
  • It is essential that we keep good track of every grade for every student.
  • Keeping good records of student attendance is something your going to need during a grade appeal.
  • Be able to explain your grading rubric / rationale.
  • Be certain that you or your spreadsheet is accurate when you calculate the grades.

 

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We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_135.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:27am PDT
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SC 134 Coordinating Class Assignments to Manage Your Workload

Coordinating Class Assignments
Managing Your Workload
Notes from Podcast #134

THE GRADING SERIES

Podcast # 132 / More Efficient Grading
Podcast # 133 / Good Feedback on Student Work
Podcast # 134 / Coordinating Class Assignments to Manage Your Workload
Podcast # 135 / Grade Appeals and Managing Your Grade Book

Student Caring Moment

Situation: More and more we are finding that students are not buying their text books. They are shopping for the best price (better than the campus bookstore). Buying books online can take longer than is healthy for the students grade. 

Our opinions:

  • Tell your students to get the text books in a timely manner.
  • Tell your students to get the right edition.
  • Explain to your students that this is an essential step toward passing the course.
  • Would you buy an $80,000. sports car (Average cost of education today) and put in cheep fuel?

Coordinating Class Assignments

  • When you are planning out your courses, think about the entire academic term.
  • Think about the big picture and don't have multiple assignments due on the same date. A.K.A. Death by grading.
  • Factor in dates of personal importance for you. Does your spouse have a birthday during your semester? Schedule in a break for yourself too.
  • Managing the grading itself. (If you don't do this part really well, it will all fall apart.)
  • Carefully define how you will grade areas that might be vague, like participation. Eliminate any ambiguity about how you track and grade each student.
  • Your grade book is a very important tool. You might use paper or adopt a computer version. Each has advantages and disadvantages.
  • Often, students do not keep track of their grades.
  • A course management system provides professors and students online access to all grading.
  • Daniel's "personality positive" method involves going to a stationary store where he purchases a really nice notebook and his favorite pens for grading. He also enters all of the grades online.

 

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We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

###

Direct download: sc_pod_134.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 11:55am PDT
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SC 133 Feedback on Student Work

Good Feedback on Student Work
Notes from Podcast #133

THE GRADING SERIES

Podcast # 132 / More Efficient Grading
Podcast # 133 / Good Feedback on Student Work
Podcast # 134 / Coordinating Class Assignments to Manage Your Workload
Podcast # 135 / Grade Appeals and Managing Your Grade Book

Student Caring Moment

Situation: A students comes into your office, during office hours. They explain that they are not doing well in your course and also reveal that they are having personal difficulties and explain what they are.

Our opinions:

  • Ask yourself: "What are my responsibilities to my college?"
  • Talk to your department chair or dean to discover what your responsibilities are.
  • This is really 2 separate situations. First, their academic standing in your class and second, to make them aware of professional services available for them.
  • Academic standing: Explain to them where they are at in your course and their options for improving their grade, or not.

Feedback on student work.

  • Creating a feedback loop between you and each student can be very advantageous.
  • David creates regular assignments called WorkNotes where the student is given an opportunity to ask questions in addition to answering questions about the reading  / topic for that class.
  • A feedback loop, in writing, gives the shy student an regular opportunity to ask their question.
  • This is opposite of the autopsy method of grading. Why the student failed.
  • Over time, this reveals information for us modify and revise our courses.

 

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We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_133.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 4:41pm PDT
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SC 132 More Efficient Grading

More Efficient Grading
Notes from Podcast #132

THE GRADING SERIES

Podcast # 133 / Good Feedback on Student Work
Podcast # 134 / Coordinating Class Assignments to Manage Your Workload
Podcast # 135 / Grade Appeals and Managing Your Grade Book

Student Caring Moment

Situation: A student, who was doing well along the way, toward the end of the term is failing your class. The next semester they are on the edge of academic probation. After a confidential meeting, you learn that they are experiencing significant difficulties in their personal life that are causing their grades to drop. You are charged with the task of helping them.

Our opinions:

  • Connect with them on a human level. Take the time to really listen to your student before offering advice about their next steps.
  • Investigate the possibility of a medical withdrawal if your university offers one.
  • Consider giving them an incomplete grade, but weigh that with your workload.

Tips for more efficient grading.

  • One of Daniel’s colleagues discovered a feature in the popular  Turn It In dot Comtii-logo service that reveals if your student has read your grading comments or not.
  • Only one-third of the students were looking at the comments.
  • Self talk: Is there anything we are doing that’s encouraging this behavior?
  • When students see a large amount of comments they are overwhelmed and don’t know how to process it. This is not helpful to the student.
  • It may be more efficient for you to give the student 2 or 3 things that you would like them to concentrate on.
  • This is a teaching strategy that moves away from direction and correction toward evaluation, coaching, and encouraging.

 

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We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_132.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:10am PDT
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SC 131 This Noble Profession - Before You Walk into the Classroom

Before You Walk Into the Classroom
For the First Time

This Noble Profession / Before You Walk Into the Classroom/ Notes from Podcast #131

Tips for your first day of teaching.

  • You need to have a game plan for your first day. The first day is really important.
  • Run through your class the night before so can get a sense of how it actually takes. Over preparing is a good approach, that way you'll always have enough materiel.
  • As you are teaching, be aware of time. David likes to have a clock in the back of the room.
  • Rest assured:
    • The students are nervous too!
    • You know more than any of the students in the class.
  • Talk to somebody else who has been teaching there awhile and ask:
    • "What are the kinds of things I can expect on the first day of class?"
  • On the first day, you are setting a "tone." Think about what "tone" you want to set. Are you seeking a relaxed learning environment, a rigourous course, a community?
  • YOU DON'T WANT TO READ THE SYLLABUS TO THEM ON THE FIRST DAY. Apologies for the CAPS, we feel strongly about this. The students will think, "What, I can't read?!"
  • Think about:
    • What do I want to present about myself?
    • What do I want to present about my subject?
  • The first day you walk into the classroom should not be the first day you walk into the classroom.
    • Get in there ahead of time and understand how the technology works.
    • Become comfortable with the environment of your classroom.
  • Arrive early on the first day. The students are expecting you to be the host as you welcome them into your academic home.
  • Find your self-confident mode.

We wish you all the best as you begin your teaching careers!

Colleagues - WELCOME!

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We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_131.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:16pm PDT
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SC 130 This Noble Profession - New Faculty Orientation

 

Faculty Orientation

New Faculty Orientation
Day One

New Faculty Orientation/ Notes from Podcast #130

Here's what we expect you will experience as part of your orientation. (By the way, all of this is overwhelming.)

  • Office set up
  • Human resources forms
  • Policies and procedures
  • University expectations
  • You will meet many new people, some of them will be important to you and some not.

Faculty Orientation Tips

  • How do you decide what's important?
    • If it is on a handout, its important, keep it!
    • Take thorough notes, especially about who does what.
  • Don't be overly concerned about the common human resources education that you will encounter. You can expect some of these:
    • Multi cultural awareness
    • (Anti) Sexual harassment training
  • Know that you will need to sign something that says you know this information.
  • When Daniel went through this at his college, he was fingerprinted.
  • This is an excellent opportunity to meet new people, especially all of the people who are starting at the same time you are.
  • In these large meetings, you can meet people from other areas of the campus which will give you a sense of the bigger picture.

Daniel tells a particularly interesting Chicago story. (You'll have to listen to the podcast to get the full benefit of this one.)

 

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Next in this series:  Podcast #131. Before you walk into the classroom for the first time...

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_130.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:59am PDT
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SC 129 This Noble Profession - Time Management

Time Management
The big picture

Time Management / Notes from Podcast #129

Map out the academic year before the year begins. 

  • Calendar your “Entire Academic Year.”
  • Prepare all of your class sessions before the first class of the academic term.
  • In your calendar, identify the “fixed” dates vs. the flexible dates.

PROFESSORIAL CATEGORIES OF WORK

  1. Committees
    • Meetings
    • Committee work (outside of meetings)
    • Be prepared, you may be on more than one committee.
  2. Research
    • Finding not just the time, but also the right place. Offices are not always the best place to concentrate. We like libraries and coffee shops. (The honey vanilla–latte helps too.)
    • Set aside time every week to do your research.
    • If you are collaborating with other colleagues on your research, you’ll need to coordinate multiple schedules.
  3. Writing
    • See research (Same principles apply)
  4. Grading
    • The “Five Papers A Day Rule” may serve you well.
    • Set aside specific time for grading else you may find that you not weekend.
    • NB:  We create our own grading workload when we design our courses.
  5. Course preparation
    • The time to take care of this is always, always, well in advance and before the first day of classes.
    • What we are after here is the effective course, not a few effective classes.

If you are finding these episodes helpful or you have specific questions, please don’t hesitate to email one of us. (see below)

All Podcasts

Next in this series:  Podcast #130. New Faculty Orientation

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_129.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:54pm PDT
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SC 128 This Noble Profession - Life Outside Work

A Series for those preparing to teach in Higher Ed for the first time.

Life Outside of Work

We did not receive much good advice about how to prepare to teach when we began our careers. In this podcast series we offer advice for our future colleagues who are about to begin their teaching careers in Higher Ed.

Life Outside of Work
There needs to be one!

Your New Colleagues/ Notes from Podcast #128

It is really easy to become a workaholic in Higher Ed

You can do anything for a short period of time, right?

  • Work hard in graduate school to get a job. Then,
  • Work hard my first few years to become established at my new job. Then,
  • Work hard to get tenure (about 7 years). Then,
  • Work hard to get promoted. Then....

You really need to protect the rest of your life or you won't have one.

  • David tells a short horror-story about a professor who worked all the time.
  • Because our schedules change from semester to semester, the lines of working and not working can become blurred because we can simply fill in all of our time with work.
  • RED FLAG ATTITUDE: "You can always improve everything."
  • There is a tendency in this profession to be a little bit compulsive. We want to improve things as we teach people.

How do we establish boundaries between family and work?

  • Daniel and his wife dedicate one day a week when there will be no work. This can be tough, but it is entirely doable.
  • David and his wife take a look at the upcoming week and schedule in sections of time when we will spend time together. Last semester, they had Tuesday mornings and Thursday afternoons.
  • Scheduling in a dinner night out once a week is highly recommended.

Stay healthy.

  • You can't do well if you don't feel well.
  • Just because you have that great health insurance plan doesn't mean you have to use it!
  • Get an annual physical and when when you don't feel well, see the doctor.
  • It is good to have a physical goal. Often times, professors spend all of their time in their heads and they forget that they have bodies.
  • Daniel and his wife set a running goal on a regular basis. They even ran a marathon! (On a very hot day in Chicago.)

Make sure that your leisure activities don't become work activities. Example: If you a theatre prof. don't go see theatre on your night off.

You can spend as much time as you like on your job and likely, your college or university will not pay you more money.

Of course, if you have a family and you have children, it is whole new challenge to manage your work responsibilities with your familial responsibilities. Your kids just want to see "you." They don't care that have just begun a new job.

You don't want to hear:  "Your students are more important to you than me!"

 

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Next in this series:  Podcast #129. Time Management - The Big Picture

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_128.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:13am PDT
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SC 127 This Noble Profession - Your New Boss

A Series for those preparing to teach in Higher Ed for the first time.

 

We did not receive much good advice about how to prepare to teach when we began our careers. In this podcast series we offer advice for our future colleagues who are about to begin their teaching careers in Higher Ed.

 

Your New Boss

Your New Colleagues/ Notes from Podcast #127

Who is you boss?

  • This can be very confusing in Higher Ed because we report to many people.
  • Most likely, your department chair is your boss, even though that person may be different from year to year..
 

Your department chair

  • They will give you your class assignments.
  • They will receive your teaching evaluations before you do.
  • These hard working people work vey hard!  Their job is typically, year round.
 

Understanding your department chairs

  • Discover what their expectations are for you.
  • You may not have much contact with this person.
  • TIP:  Check with this person before you take on additional responsibilities.

TIP:  Investigate the tenure process and introduce yourself to persons who are in charge of this area.

 

Next in this series:  Podcast #128. Life Outside Work

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_127.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:08pm PDT
Comments[0]

SC 126  This Noble Profession - Your New Colleagues

A Series for those preparing to teach in Higher Ed for the first time.

 

We did not receive much good advice about how to prepare to teach when we began our careers. In this podcast series we offer advice for our future colleagues who are about to begin their teaching careers in Higher Ed.

Your New Colleagues

 

Your New Colleagues/ Notes from Podcast #126

Your department administrator

  • These colleagues are your new best friend.
  • They will help you with forms, paperwork, countless other items that you need to do your job.
 

Your interview committee members

  • Take time to know these people better.
  • These are the first people who accepted you first, they are your allies.
 

The people who you will be working closest with

  • Identify who these people are in your institution. Who will you be working with on a daily basis?
  • Your department chair / immediate supervisor.
  • Get to know those people who are doing the same job that you are. You are probably not the only professor teaching that subject or those courses.
  • Identify key support staff members and get to know them.
  • Get to know your campus technology people.

Next in this series:  Podcast #127. Your New Boss

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_126.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:16pm PDT
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Course Design / Notes from Podcast #125

When you design your courses, ask yourself these questions:

  • What do I want your students to learn?
  • How am I going to communicate this to my students?
  • What assessment mechanisms will I employ?
  • How will I keep myself sane! (Beyond really–good coffee)

Best practices: (A.K.A. – things we have learned the hard way)

  • Request the syllabus and course materials from when the class was taught before.
  • Take the time to set up an organizational system for all your courses and your academic life.
  • Divide your course design into segments.
  • Help your students to know how they are doing in your class before the course drop date.
  • Stagger, across all of your course when you will have papers due and when you be in “Grading Mode.” (This is keep yourself sane tip!)
  • Be aware of college–wide calendar issues. Do you really want to plan a big test for the day after everyone returns from spring break?
  • Create a detailed class schedule for each class so your students will be able to prepare and plan ahead.
  • Request a copy of the course evaluations that your students will be filling out. Put this above your computer screen and keep it in the forefront of your mind as you design your courses.
  • Familiarize yourself – NO – learn the learning management system and know what your college requires.

 

Next in this series:  Podcast #126. Your New Colleagues

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_125.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:19am PDT
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SC 124  This Noble Profession - Your Students

A Series for those preparing to teach in Higher Ed for the first time.

Who Will You Be Teaching?

We did not receive much good advice about how to prepare to teach when we began our careers. In this podcast series we offer advice for our future colleagues who are about to begin their teaching careers in Higher Ed.

Learning About Who You Will be Teaching / Notes from Podcast #124

Learning About Who Your Students Are

  • Request an academic report from your admissions or I.T. department.
  • Ask your students to write a “Who we are” paper.
  • During the first days of instruction conduct informal “Getting to know each other” conversations with your new students.

Research

  • Perform an Internet search of what has occurred in the lifetime of your students. Making a reference to something that occurred 25 years ago may not be relatable for them.

Perspective & Tone

  • Most of your students are just three months out of high school.
  • Set the tone in the first few days of classes. Let your student know what your expectations are for them. This will put them at ease by eliminating some of their unknowns and fears.
  • Remember that YOU only have one chance to make a first impression on your students, this is important.

Next in this series:  Podcast #125. Course Design

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_124.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:38pm PDT
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SC 123  This Noble Profession - Environment

We did not receive much good advice about how to prepare to teach when we began our careers. In this podcast series we offer advice for our future colleagues who are about to begin their teaching careers in Higher Ed.

Your New Environment / Notes from Podcast #123

Living Considerations

  • Where you live in relationship to where you work is important.
  • Commuting two to four hours a day can take a lot out of you.
  • Consider the negative aspects of being too close to campus. The lack of physical distance can lead to a "fishbowl" experience.
  • As a new prof. you need to be physically on campus and visible as much as possible.

The College Environment

  • Working on a campus is really nice!
  • Most folks who go to work every day do not experience they joy of working in a place of learning.
  • Don't become a cubicle worker. Get out and interact with others around campus.
  • We encourage you introduce yourself to people in other departments.
  • Go to sporting and arts events. Universities have a great deal to offer.

Setting Up Your Office

  • "A place for everything and everything in its place."
  • Create a welcoming and interesting place for your students when they come to visit.
  • Organizing your office will reduce your stress level.


Next in this series:  Podcast #124. Learning about who you will be teaching.

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_123.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 6:08am PDT
Comments[0]

SC 122  This Noble Profession

NEW Podcast Series!
This Noble Profession

Information for those preparing to teach in Higher Ed for the first time.

THE SERIES

123.Your new environment

124.Learning about who you will be teaching

125.Course design

126.Your new colleagues

127.Your new boss

128.Life outside of work

129.Time Management – The Big Picture

130.New faculty orientation

131.Before you walk into the classroom for the first time

Direct download: sc_pod_122.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 6:07am PDT
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SC 122  This Noble Profession

NEW Podcast Series!
This Noble Profession

Information for those preparing to teach in Higher Ed for the first time.

THE SERIES

123.Your new environment

124.Learning about who you will be teaching

125.Course design

126.Your new colleagues

127.Your new boss

128.Life outside of work

129.Time Management – The Big Picture

130.New faculty orientation

131.Before you walk into the classroom for the first time

Direct download: sc_pod_122.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:00am PDT
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SC 121  College Prepares us for 100 Years Ago.
Direct download: sc_pod_121.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:22am PDT
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SC 120  A Revealing Student Survey
Direct download: sc_pod_120.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:37pm PDT
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SC 119  Student situation: What would you do?
Direct download: sc_pod_119.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 12:23pm PDT
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SC 118  Senioritis
Direct download: sc_pod_118.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:59am PDT
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SC 117  Recognizing Professorial Stress
Direct download: sc_pod_117.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 11:52am PDT
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SC 116  Student Stress
Direct download: sc_pod_116.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 2:26pm PDT
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SC 115  College Life and the Rest of Our Life
Direct download: sc_pod_115.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:21pm PDT
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SC 114  How to Fail a Class
Direct download: sc_pod_114.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 11:15am PDT
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SC 113  Boundaries and Balancing Your Life
Direct download: sc_pod_113.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:42pm PDT
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SC 112  Peter, the Workaholic Professor
Direct download: sc_pod_112.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 12:03pm PDT
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SC 111  Boundaries at Work
Direct download: sc_pod_111.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 6:00am PDT
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SC 110 #4. Student Success
Direct download: sc_pod_110.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:43am PDT
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Direct download: sc_109.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:28am PDT
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SC 108 #2. Student Success
Direct download: sc_108.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 11:49am PDT
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SC 107 #1. Student Success
Direct download: pod_107.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:08am PDT
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SC 106  #5. Creating Positive Collegial Relationships
Direct download: pod_106.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:09pm PDT
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Direct download: pod_105.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:36pm PDT
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SC 104  #3. Creating Positive Collegial Relationships
Direct download: sc_104.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 1:00pm PDT
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Direct download: sc_103.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:53pm PDT
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Direct download: sc_102.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:46pm PDT
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Direct download: sc_101.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 1:15pm PDT
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Direct download: sc_100.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 1:30pm PDT
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SC 99  #9. Course Evals: Learning
Direct download: sc_99.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 6:00am PDT
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Direct download: sc_98.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:46am PDT
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Direct download: sc_97.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 6:57pm PDT
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Direct download: sc_96.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:33pm PDT
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Direct download: sc_95.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 2:40pm PDT
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This blogpost and podcast is for our colleagues in higher educations, professors, the world over.

This is #4 in our series on teaching: Course Evaluations

SC 94  #4. Course Evals: Focus #2: What are your trends?

Learning from an analysis over time.

Direct download: sc_94.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 2:16pm PDT
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