Student Caring - A Podcast for Professors
Join professors de Roulet and Pecoraro as they encourage professors to achieve success.
SC 167 Going to College for the First Time

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 167 Going to College for the First Time

We invite you to check out our appearances page.  We offer faculty presentations on the topics of "Student Caring" / "Student Success" and "Effective Teaching" New, this year is our presentation for parents of high school and college students, "What Professors Wish Parents Knew About College". We would love to visit you and your colleagues at your college.

 

Going to College for the First Time / Prof. Daniel de Roulet

Most of your education—especially the last four years—has been pointing to this moment.  But now what?  What should you expect from going away to college in the fall, and what can you do this summer to get ready?

1. Close the door on high school and focus on the future.  We know this isn’t easy.  You’re leaving behind friends, family, significant others, the familiarity of your home and your town/suburb/city—in some cases, country—to start a new life, and it’s hard to say goodbye.  On the other hand, there may be some advantages to leaving some of these things behind, and college is a good excuse to make the break.  We’re just saying.

There are few times when people have the opportunity to start life anew, even to reinvent themselves (on-line role-playing games excluded).  Are there things you didn’t like about your high school life?  Are there things you didn’t like about you in high school?  Have you been interested in areas you have never had the chance to try out?  Do you want to redefine your relationship with your parents?  Now’s your chance.

2. Learn as much as you can about your new environment.  Although nothing substitutes for actually living through a new experience, finding out about your new environment with soften the culture shock that many students feel at the beginning of college.  Get on line and see what you can find out about the college’s location and surrounding community, its campus, its students and activities, and your professors.  Get out your schedule of classes for the fall and try to find the buildings—get a sense for whether your walk from class to class will be one minute or fifteen.  Find you residence hall on the map and try to find some pictures of the rooms.  Visit your professors’ websites (most easily found through department websites) and see what their interests and expertise are.

3. Do some pre-course work.  Sometimes the first week of classes is a little overwhelming, especially in terms of finding out how much you’ll have to read and what your assignments will be. Find your course syllabi on-line, if they are available and up-to-date; see what books are required for your courses at the bookstore, especially paying attention to the edition of the textbook required.   If you find the syllabi, read them repeatedly, so that some of the information becomes second hand to you before your classes begin.  Consider buying the recommended edition of the book before you get to your college and do a little introductory skimming and reading.  You might get a good deal on the books, and you’ll avoid some long lines during the first week.

4. Begin to make a calendar for the year.  Once you obtain your course syllabi, note key exam and assignments dates—these notes will help you manage your time, decrease your number of surprises, and help you to decide how to best balance study and social events.  Also, write in important family and friend dates—birthdays, anniversaries, and the like.

A little work in the summer can make for a smoother transition in the fall.   And enjoy your summer—outside of work and thinking about college, find time to revel, rest, and recharge.

Recent high school graduates:  what concerns do you have about going to college?

 

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_167.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 5:38pm PST
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SC 166 Integrated Teaching With the Field Trip

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

Teaching Techniques for Today’s Students
SC 166 Integrated Teaching With the Field Trip

Daniel shares how his sixth grade field trip influenced his life.

David’s research on the topic of our upcoming book, “What Professors Wish Parents Knew About College” reveled this quote:

One day she happened to sign up for a day trip from Scripps to Tijuana, Mexico, to help do some painting and other charitable work in an especially impoverished neighborhood. When she got there, she recalled, I held a baby who could barely breathe, and the mother didn’t have the money to take the baby to the doctor, and you could literally see the United States on the other side of the border. I was just blown away. The moment stayed with her, and during her sophomore year, she applied for a grant that would give her the funds necessary to live in Tijuana for the summer and work with indigent children there.
She got it.

Excerpt from: Bruni, Frank. “Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be.”

The field trip gives you an opportunity to make the message of the class very real.

Creating a college fiend trip that will maximize your students learning.

  • If there will be expenses involved, build those into the lab fee.
  • Find the best day in the semester for the field trip.
  • A field trip can create, for your students, significant learning experiences.
  • Utilize the resources, human and physical, available to you in your geographic area.

Daniel interviews David about his “Arts Day” – mega field trip experience.

  • Prepare your students for the field trip by educating them about the topic ahead of time.
  • Advertise the date of the field trip, well in advance.
  • Create a field trip that is highly educational and fun.
  • Think about logistical items:
    • Cost
    • Tickets
    • Transportation
    • Meals
    • Learning Goals and Materials.
  • Be prepared with a “PLAN B” for students who can’t make, or miss, the field trip.
  • Followup the field trip with an in-class assignment that maximized the experience.

 

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

Click this Link to Subscribe via iTunes

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

###

SC 166 Integrated Teaching With the Field Trip

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.
The Caring Professor




The Caring Professor

Direct download: sc_pod_166.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:22am PST
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SC 165 Teaching With Homework

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

Teaching Techniques for Today’s Students
SC 165 Teaching With Homework

Teaching With Homework

Ways we can improve teaching with homework.

  • Daniel asked his class: “Do you think differently because of your technology and social media? How do you manage your tasks?” Answer: “Our phones play a role in distracting us from concentrating on important tasks, like homework.”
  • Distraction, for our students, is the enemy of homework.
  • What can we do about this? Not much! It’s up to the student to develop their self discipline.
  • High School AP (Advanced Placement) programs are burning our students out before the get to us. Watch the film: RACE TO NOWHERE…  (Click on the picture below) Prepare to be disturbed.

Race to Nowhere Film

Homework Reading

  • Our students seem to want to do as little reading as possible.
  • David heavily integrates required (and graded) reading assignments into his courses.
  • Daniel will require his homework assignments to be hand written. This gets them off the computer and decreases their distraction level.

Isn’t this bizarre, that in this age of technology, we are finding ways for our students to not use it? – Dr. Daniel de Roulet

  • There is something, almost artistic when you are crafting the letters with your own hand vs. just typing them on the keyboard.
  • Make sure that you are giving the students feedback on their homework.
  • Impress on your students that they must buy the textbook – else, “You are dead-in-the-water before you begin.”
  • Daniel sees a lot of his students reading on their phones. This presents a variety of concerns about note-taking, comprehension, and distractions.

A lot of students who spend time on the their phones are complaining of loneliness.

How do we integrate homework into the day-to-day class meetings?

  • Require students to do the reading before the topic is discussed in class. Knowing that they will be involved in a discussion beforehand will prompt them to be prepared.
  • Accountability at the beginning of class is a good approach. (In the podcast version, listen to Daniel tell his story about “Standing Students!”

 

Homework is about fostering a continued learning experience outside of the class in their daily lives.

CARNEGIE RULE:  3 hours of work outside of class for every hour in class.

 

Next Week: The Field Trip

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

Click this Link to Subscribe via iTunes

Click this Link to Listen on Stitcher Smart Radio

Click this Link to Subscribe via Google Play

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_165.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:52pm PST
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SC 164 Teaching in the Lab

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

Teaching Techniques for Today's Students
SC 164 Teaching in the Lab

SC 164 Teaching in the Lab

Teaching in the lab can be very different, depending on your discipline. Daniel teaches in a writing lab and David in the theater. In this podcast, we explore (lab) teaching techniques for today's students.

Lab facts:

  • An educational lab is given birth to when the course is designed and proposed.
  • Some courses have a lab requirement built in and for some, it is separate.
  • Often, a lab fee will be required when there are expendable materials required.

Lab teaching in a collaborative environment.

  • Colleagues will say to (Theater) David, "You can't teach that, they learn by doing."
  • Both can be achieved in carefully constructed labs and courses.
  • In a deadline driven environment, the student needs to learn under pressure.
  • When the professor and student are sitting side by side, the opportunities for collaboration increase.
  • Students get excited when they are put in charge of something.
  • DISADVANTAGE:  The pressure that comes with a deadline for a public performance can place me in the middle of making a decision that is either best for the student or best for the audience. My position is always: Our primary focus is on the student's learning, not the show. Our product (if we think that way) is the student who walks across the commencement stage, not the performance occurring on the stage. The theatre lab, including the performance, is a learning environment.
  • ADVANTAGE: Very quickly, when a student has a success, they experience a boost of self confidence.

"For a student, the classroom can be a lonely place." – Daniel

The lab: An opportunity for individual instruction and connection.

  • Look for ways you can encourage your students, one on one in the lab.
  • The demeanor of the professor in the lab is really important. More conversational gives the student an opportunity to express what's on their mind. Our students will see the lab as a safe place rather than a place where they feel like they have to perform.
  • If grading is involved in the lab, a syllabus needs to be in place.
  • The biggest advantage of the lab is one-on-one time with the professor. (Office hours seem to be a dying art!)

 

Next: Homework

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

Click this Link to Subscribe via iTunes

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_164.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 4:29pm PST
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