Student Caring - A Podcast for Professors
Join professors de Roulet and Pecoraro as they encourage professors to achieve success.
SC 199 Cheating During a Test

Following a test, you receive an email from a student informing you that the person sitting in front of them was looking at their smart phone during the test. They say: “You should be paying closer attention during your tests.”

Listen to Daniel and David as they explore this situation.

Referenced Web Page:  Podcast #15  http://studentcaring.com/howtocheatincollege/

 

What would you do?

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_199.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 1:38pm PDT
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SC 198 Your Star Student's Star is Fading

You are the Professor In charge of a group or team based course. These could be a sports team, performing group, or research laboratory. Your STAR student, who was carrying the group has become unreliable.

Consequences:
The team is loosing games - consequently casting a negative light on your university and could result in less funding.

The research project is falling behind schedule and is in jeopardy of loosing their funding. This will directly impact your income.

OPTIONS / DISCUSSION

Daniel: I fell like we are back in ETHICS 101, this is not an easy situation.

You and the student:
You need to put aside all of the other concerns and concentrate on the student.
Try to discover why their performance is faltering and seek to help them.
What can I do as a professor?

Why do high achieving students falter?
They can be in a position of high responsibility for the first time in their lives.

We are not there to put out the absolute best product, we are there to help students learn.
The team or performance group may not be the best, that's okay. 
If the focus is on winning, then we are not really teaching anymore.

If your team is very public, the decision you make will influence the public about not only you, but your university. 

It is wise not rely on one person (student) to be in a key leadership position. Build a team.

What would you do?

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_198.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 2:06pm PDT
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SC 197 Can't Afford the Tuition

Student Centered Decisions While Professoring
SC 197 Can't Afford the Tuition

NOTES FROM OUR PODCAST

Daniel and David explore a challenging student situation and discuss options.

SITUATION
Your student comes to your office hours during finals week and informs you that their parents can't afford the tuition and they have to go back home to a more affordable and less prestigious college. They want your advice.

You have someone in front of you who is very much in need of good advice.

OPTIONS / DISCUSSION
Take time to actively listen to what your student has to say.

During difficulty meetings like this, recognize that what you say to your student may be forgotten. It is a good idea to take notes, then give them to your student - on paper. 

Daniel:  Often times, I forget particular situations with my students in my classroom. It would server me well, as a prof. to remember that a number of my students are there because they or their family are making pretty significant sacrifices. As I walk into the classroom, I want to be able to give them good things. I want to be able to honor the sacrifice and commitment they are making by offering them the best that I can offer them.

David: This may be the last time I sit and visit with this student. I want to make sure that every single word I say and the advice I give is "good." Last impressions last a very long time.

Advice for your student.
Encourage them to look deep with themselves and recall their hopes and dreams. Explain that this change in their academic career should not dissuade them. There are many educational institutions that help them to realize their goals.

After giving them the good financial advice, say something truthful and encouraging to that student about their potential. You may offer to write them a letter of recommendation that is affirming.

Share with your student a story of a previous student, or yourself, who was in a similar situation and it turned out well.

 

What would you do?

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_197.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 12:50pm PDT
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SC 196 Student Centered Decisions While Professoring

Student Centered Decisions While Professoring
SC 196 Tough Love or Tough?

 

 NOTES FROM OUR PODCAST

Daniel and David explore a challenging student situation and discuss options.

A likable student with potential is not performing up to PAR.

The grade they will earn while in your class will determine their future at your college.

 

What would you do?

 

Direct download: sc_pod_196.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 1:44pm PDT
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SC 195 Burnout Solutions #3

 NOTES FROM OUR PODCAST

Focusing on the positive:

  • Multitasking comes upon us slowly as we take on additional responsibilities over time.
  • Often, we can't do much about our current schedule, however, we can look ahead to a future academic year and make some changes.
  • During your holiday break:
    • Look at how your last semester went.
    • Think about how many plates you have in the air.
    • What plates give you enjoyment and which ones do not?
  • Choose not to make the negative aspects of your job – a focus.
  • Journaling can provide a place to reflect on your job and a place to process your feelings.

A Holiday Break Challenge:

  • Look over your daily school life calendar.
    • Mark in red those activities that you do not enjoy.
    • Mark in green those activities that you do enjoy.
    • Plot a strategy to turn more of your hours to green.

What do others observe that you do well and enjoy?

Try to remember, during this break, why you got into this career in the first place.

 

We’re basing our podcasts on an application of Dr. Dike Drummond’s book, Stop Physician Burnout: What to Do When Working Harder Isn’t Working. Dr. Drummond was a successful family physician, working his dream job in a dream location, when he realized he could not continue. His burnout was so severe that he walked away from the practice of medicine, and now dedicates his time to helping doctors avoid burnout and find meaning and satisfaction in their profession.

Unfortunately, most of the ideas and observations Dr. Drummond presents are also present in higher education. Our task will be to apply what fits to the educator’s world, and to offer some discipline-specific observations as well.

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_195.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 4:08pm PDT
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SC 194 Burnout Solutions #2

SOLUTIONS TO EDUCATOR BURNOUT NO. 2

FOR ALL OF OUR U.S. FRIENDS, HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

BURNOUT IS A DILEMMA, RATHER THAN A PROBLEM:

  • If your problem is that you have to grade 25 papers, the solution is to grade them.
  • REALITY CHECK: You realize that when you grade them, they will be done, but what will happen next? There’s always more. That’s a dilemma.
  • We seek to adopt a mindset that solves our dilemma.
  • We see our colleagues always taking on extra work.
  • Dr. Dike Drummond:    “You solve a problem and you manage a dilemma.”
  • In his book, Dr. Drummond differentiates between “problems” and “dilemmas.” A problem has a clear solution and can, indeed, be solved. A dilemma is something more complicated—something without a clear solution or a problem that has been in place for a very long time. Faculty who serve on college or university committees may be tempted to work on what they think are problems, only to find that their work is seemingly being wasted on a dilemma. Politics in a department might seem like a problem, but the interpersonal roots of the problem, compounded over time, can have transformed what was once a problem into a dilemma.
  • You and who every your boss is need have a talk about healthy productivity and personal energy.
  • Daniel, upon his return from a recent sabbatical trip to Ethiopia states: I realized that I need to put a couple of things in my life that prevent me from using all of my life for work.

DO THE BIG 180:

  • Focus on what you want instead of what you don’t.
  • As educators, we are problem solvers. Sometimes the problems can’t be solved.
  • How many emails do you receive that are negative? Do you know what this student did?!#%
  • Find something that you really enjoy at work. What would your job look like if you focused on that one thing?

MORE TO COME!

We’re basing our podcasts on an application of Dr. Dike Drummond’s book, Stop Physician Burnout: What to Do When Working Harder Isn’t Working. Dr. Drummond was a successful family physician, working his dream job in a dream location, when he realized he could not continue. His burnout was so severe that he walked away from the practice of medicine, and now dedicates his time to helping doctors avoid burnout and find meaning and satisfaction in their profession.

Unfortunately, most of the ideas and observations Dr. Drummond presents are also present in higher education. Our task will be to apply what fits to the educator’s world, and to offer some discipline-specific observations as well.

WE WELCOME YOUR COMMENTS, FEEDBACK AND GUEST POST SUBMISSIONS.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

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SC 194 BURNOUT SOLUTIONS #2

The Caring Professor

The Caring Professor

Direct download: sc_pod_194.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 10:16am PDT
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SC 193 Burnout Solutions #1

SC 193 Burnout Solutions #1

student-caring

We’re basing our podcasts on an application of Dr. Dike Drummond’s book, Stop Physician Burnout: What to Do When Working Harder Isn’t Working. Dr. Drummond was a successful family physician, working his dream job in a dream location, when he realized he could not continue. His burnout was so severe that he walked away from the practice of medicine, and now dedicates his time to helping doctors avoid burnout and find meaning and satisfaction in their profession.

Unfortunately, most of the ideas and observations Dr. Drummond presents are also present in higher education. Our task will be to apply what fits to the educator’s world, and to offer some discipline-specific observations as well.

 SOLUTIONS TO EDUCATOR BURNOUT

 

No. 1:  Your inner perfectionist critic:

  • We are our own worse critic.
    • Oh, I could do better.
    • I can't grade papers fast enough.
    • I could have done better in that meeting.
  • Our response: "Thank you for sharing."

No. 2:  Burnout is a problem, not a dilemma:

  • We can solve problems.

No. 3:  Do the big 180:

  • Focus on what you want instead of what you don't.

No. 4: You are not a super hero, become a great plate spinner instead:

  • Learn how to spin one plate really well. Once you have done that, consider adding another plate.

No. 5:  Celebrate all wins:

  • Lean to be happy will all wins and don't focus on the failures.
    • Treat yourself like a good dog. (A cute one.)

Your inner perfectionist critic:

  • Our desire to be perfect is motivated by a strong desire to be the best.
  • Our training (graduate school) forces us to strive for perfection.
  • Perfection can lead to despair. 
  • Student: "Oh, that professor is just coasting."
  • Talk back to the voices in your head:
    • "I hear what you're saying, thanks." Now, move on.

Your inner perfectionist critic:

  • Our desire to be perfect is motivated by a strong desire to be the best.
  • Our training (graduate school) forces us to strive for perfection.

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_193.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 10:09pm PDT
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SC 192 The Specific Causes of Burnout in Educators 3

Podcast 192:  The Specific Causes of Burnout in Educators (Part 3)

 

Conditioning—how our educations set unrealistic expectations for our careers:

 

The expectations we experienced in graduate training have profound effects on the expectations of ourselves that we carry into our careers.  Consider the following list of expectations:

 

  • We are assigned reading lists that we cannot possibly finish.
  • We need to keep current in our fields by reading even more.
  • We are to be judged, professionally, on the quality and quantity of our research and our publications or productions.
  • We are often not trained to teach.
  • Teaching is just something we do to help pay for our graduate educations.

 

Compare this to the typical job of a professor who does not find himself or herself working in a primarily research-oriented job where course loads are at a minimum:

 

  • You are evaluated and promoted primarily on the basis of your teaching.
  • Part of your evaluation is based on service to the college or university (committee work and advising), which you did not do as a graduate student.
  • You are expected to publish, even though your time for research is greatly diminished from your days as a graduate student.

 

We have seen a number of colleagues who feel like failures in their profession, even when they are succeeding in their current jobs as educators.  Why?  Because they are not in the type of school their graduate work trained them for, and they are not living up to the expectations ingrained in them by their graduate work.

 

Direct download: sc_pod_192.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 9:38am PDT
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SC 191 The Specific Causes of Burnout in Educators 2

SC 191 The Specific Causes of Burnout in Educators 2

student-caring-burnout

ADDITIONAL CAUSES OF BURNOUT

Poor leadership:

 

  • Poor bosses are the number one reason employees state for leaving a job. In education, because of the unclear lines of authority present in the profession,  we often have several bosses:  a mentor, the department chair, the dean, and higher administration.  Each make demands on the educator that must be met.
  • Educators are by nature idealists and people who like to improve or fix things. Realizing that co-workers or “bosses” do no share their idealizing, or realizing that certain things will not be fixed, can be devastating to an educator’s morale.
  • In his book, Dr. Drummond differentiates between “problems” and “dilemmas.” A problem has a clear solution and can, indeed, be solved.  A dilemma is something more complicated—something without a clear solution or a problem that has been in place for a very long time.  Faculty who serve on college or university committees may be tempted to work on what they think are problems, only to find that their work is seemingly being wasted on a dilemma.  Politics in a department might seem like a problem, but the interpersonal roots of the problem, compounded over time, can have transformed what was once a problem into a dilemma.
  • A dysfunctional administration, or a school culture that changes very slowly (glacially), can lead to disappointment and burnout.
  • Administrators come from several different backgrounds: they have been educated in college administration; they are highly ambitious individuals who find the administration of an institution more interesting than the practice of education; they have worked their way through the ranks and want to give what they have learned to the institution and their colleagues; they are burned out educators looking to retreat into other sorts of work.  Some of these backgrounds negatively affect administrative views of faculty, and can lead to faculty disillusionment (just as faculty stereotypes of administrators, expressed in some of the categories above, can negatively affect faculty views of administration).

Life issues:

 

As educators, we are always “on stage.”  You must be fully there in a classroom to be an effective instructor.  Difficult life issues, such as those listed below, shorten your fuse, drain your energy levels, and make it difficult to be fully present to your students and colleagues:

 

  • Health (your own health and the health of loved ones)
  • Finances
  • Family problems

 

As educators, we cannot “retreat” for a time into our offices, or into an assigned project.  We need to be “on stage”—even when that’s the last thing we feel like doing.

WE WELCOME YOUR COMMENTS, FEEDBACK AND GUEST POST SUBMISSIONS.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

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Click this Link to Subscribe via iTunes

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SC 191 THE SPECIFIC CAUSES OF BURNOUT IN EDUCATORS 2

The Caring Professor

The Caring Professor

Direct download: sc_pod_191.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 1:13pm PDT
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SC 190 The Specific Causes of Burnout in Educators 1

SC 190 The Specific Causes of Burnout in Educators 1

student-caring-educator-burnout

Dr. Drummond identifies five general categories of burnout’s causes:

 

  1. The profession itself
  2. Your specific job
  3. Poor leadership
  4. Life issues
  5. Conditioning: the unrealistic expectations our educations have placed on us

 

Education has its own specifics that it brings to these categories.

 

The profession itself:

 

  • Never-ending work and hours: the work of grading papers, doing research, and preparing lectures is never finished.  These tasks will take up as much time as you give them.  Educators find themselves continuing their work into evenings and weekends, never feeling caught-up or well enough prepared.
  • Not seeing enough specific results—wave after wave of starting at the beginning: While there are advantages to beginning each term with a new batch of students, educators fall into the trap of wondering why, after teaching the same information and skills for so long, these students just don’t “get it.”  Also, we see our students for limited periods and, unless we have the pleasure of observing our students over four years, we do not see the results of the educational seeds we plant.
  • Problem students: Those of our students who are needy, disruptive, or who have severe problems to work through take up a lot of our time.  Encounters with such students can take the energy out of a class, turning it into something to dread instead of something to be excited about.
  • Public stereotypes: Who of us have not experienced the dismissal of our work from other professionals?  They are convinced we don’t work hard, have long vacations, and coast because of tenure.  They do not understand the truth of our profession—that a job that is not nine to five means endless work.
  • Income: We don’t enter education to get rich.  Our income often necessitates taking on extra classes or outside work, perpetuating the cycle of burnout.

 

Your specific job:

 

  • Course loads and overloads: Many of our colleagues teach four courses per semester, are expected to serve on college or university committees, take assigned work of the departments, advise students, and are expected to publish.  There’s also pressure to take on overload courses in some departments where hiring has not kept up with enrollment growth.
  • Committees and boundaries: Although they meet relatively infrequently, committee work can also demand preparation and additional tasks to be completed outside meeting times.  Committee work, like grading, research, and course preparation, will often take as much time as you’re willing to give it.
  • Politics: While politics are a way of life on any job, they can seem particularly complicated in the world of academe.  Difficult politics in a department, or in one’s interaction with administration, can make for a chronically stressful work environment.
  • Poor relationships with specific colleagues: Like problem students, difficult colleagues can become the focus of our interactions.  And, of course, sometimes we can be the difficult colleague, causing problems for those around us.  Educators experiencing burnout are good candidates for being difficult colleagues.

WE WELCOME YOUR COMMENTS, FEEDBACK AND GUEST POST SUBMISSIONS.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

Click this Link to Subscribe via iTunes

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SC 190 THE SPECIFIC CAUSES OF BURNOUT IN EDUCATORS 1

The Caring Professor

The Caring Professor

 

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Category:Education -- posted at: 10:06am PDT
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SC 189 Introducing Educator Burnout and its Causes

SC 189 Introducing Educator Burnout and its Causes

 educator-burnout

We’re basing our podcasts on an application of Dr. Dike Drummond’s book, Stop Physician Burnout:  What to Do When Working Harder Isn’t Working.  Dr. Drummond was a successful family physician, working his dream job in a dream location, when he realized he could not continue.  His burnout was so severe that he walked away from the practice of medicine, and now dedicates his time to helping doctors avoid burnout and find meaning and satisfaction in their profession.

Unfortunately, most of the ideas and observations Dr. Drummond presents are also present in higher education.  Our task will be to apply what fits to the educator’s world, and to offer some discipline-specific observations as well.

Stress and burnout are not the same.  Stress is temporary and can be motivating, while burnout is a chronic condition that de-motivates and gets worse over time.  Dr. Drummond identifies three key symptoms of burnout:

  • Exhaustion—no matter how many breaks you take, exhaustion does not go away. It’s like filling up your tank in the gas station, and while driving away, realizing your tank is still registering “empty.”
  • Depersonalization—the feeling of just wanting to get through your work uninterrupted by students, colleagues, and administration. The stages of depersonalization are venting, sarcasm, cynicism, and “compassion fatigue.”  Compassion fatigue is the point of knowing that you should care about the students and co-workers around you, but you just don’t have anything left to give.
  • Hopelessness—feelings of no longer having a purpose in your work, or of not making a difference.

WE WELCOME YOUR COMMENTS, FEEDBACK AND GUEST POST SUBMISSIONS.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

Click this Link to Subscribe via iTunes

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Click this Link to Subscribe via Google Play

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SC 189 INTRODUCING EDUCATOR BURNOUT AND ITS CAUSES

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.
The Caring Professor




The Caring Professor

 

Direct download: sc_pod_189.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 10:32am PDT
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SC 188 Text Books

How we can help our students with textbooks. 

 student-caring-textbooks

Our students are not known for being the best textbook readers.

THE NATURE OF TEXTBOOKS IN HIGHER EDUCATION TODAY.

  • Textbooks are sometimes prohibitively expensive.
  • Students can’t afford the required books.
  • Student: “I can get another version of the textbook cheeper!”
    • Disaster.
  • Student: “My textbook didn’t arrive yet!”
    • Meaning: “It is their fault.”

HOW WE CAN HELP OUR STUDENTS UNDERSTAND HOW IMPORTANT THE TEXT BOOKS AND READING THEM ARE FOR THEIR SUCCESS.

  • Tell your students how important and critical it is that they get the textbook immediately.
  • Professor: “How many of you are interested in getting an “A” in the class? Please raise your hand.”
    • Lots of hands go up!
    • Professor:  “Great! You need to buy the book, today.” I am not guaranteeing you an “A,” but I am saying that won’t get an “A” unless you buy the book.”
  • We can order an instructor copy and put it on reserve in the library.
  • We can gently suggest to our students that they share a textbook.
    • Given the right situation and maturity level, sharing a textbook can work.
  • Make sure your assignments are actually using the readings in the textbooks.
    • Student: “They made me buy the textbook for $300. and we didn’t even use it!”
  • In week two or three say: “How many of you have the book?”

 

Next week: Introduction to the series: The Causes of Burnout for Educators.

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

Click this Link to Subscribe via iTunes

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SC 188 TEXTBOOKS

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.
The Caring Professor




The Caring Professor

 

Direct download: sc_pod_188.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 4:04pm PDT
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SC 187 Meetings - Meetings - Meetings!

How we can thrive and survive - meetings.

student-caring

Notes from our podcast.

What makes a meeting bad, good, and recommendations.

  • Meetings are part of our lives, either as the organizer or attendee.
  • Bad meetings are meetings that run long.
  • Meetings should not run more than 30 minutes.
  • Causes of a bad meeting:
    • A poorly established agenda
    • Lack of leadership
    • The tendency of people to talk to much
  • How do you know when you are in a good meeting?
    • The time goes by quickly
    • There is a purpose to the meeting
    • The meeting ends when you are done with the agenda
  • A meeting should only exist if there is reason for the personnel to interact with a topic.
  • Do not bring people together to inform them.
  • Colleagues should not be allowed to speak endlessly.

Recommendations...

  • You can set time limits on the agenda items.
  • Recognize that you can't control the behavior of others, but you can control your own.
  • Think about what you want to say and say it concisely. 
  • If a meeting is wandering off topic, you can bring everyone back to focus by stating where we are and where we need to be.

Next week: Buying and Reading Books

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

Click this Link to Subscribe via iTunes

Click this Link to Listen on Stitcher Smart Radio

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SC 187 Meetings - Meetings - Meetings!

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.
The Caring Professor




The Caring Professor

 

Direct download: sc_pod_187.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 7:34pm PDT
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SC 186 Caring for First Generation College Students

 

sc-186-caring-for-first-generation-college-students

How we can welcome our newest college students...

Notes from our podcast.

  • Statistics tell us that the population of students who are first in their families to attend college is growing.
  • Families want their kids to get better jobs than they have and see a college education as the answer.
  • Families often don't understand what a college experience will be like for their kids.
  • At David's university, 44% of the student population are first time college students. Wow!
  • These students are pioneers in their families.
  • Parents may have unrealistic expectation for their kids and apply unneccessary pressure.

Independance and Responsibility...

  • The notion of a syllabus and assignments may cause great fear for them. Moreover, they may be embarrassed about asking too many questions.
  • We need to teach and encourage these students more than others because they have no one at home who understands the college journey. We need to help them to understand the landscape.

Recommendations...

  • Have your university create a website of resources for first generation students and their parents, possibly available in multiple languages.
  • Get to know who these students are in your classes.
  • Recognize that these students need extra special care.
  • Let your students know that okay to "not get it all the time."

Next week: Meetings - Meetings - Meetings!

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

Click this Link to Subscribe via iTunes

Click this Link to Listen on Stitcher Smart Radio

Click this Link to Subscribe via Google Play

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SC 186 Caring for First Generation College Students

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.
The Caring Professor




The Caring Professor

 

Direct download: sc_pod_186.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 10:28am PDT
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SC 185 Welcoming New Students

HOW WE CAN WELCOME OUR NEWEST COLLEGE STUDENTS…

  • We can identify who they are by asking for a show of hands or asking them to complete a survey.
  • Help your students understand what “college behavior” is and what you expect. This is not a continuation of high school.
  • Very early in the semester, our students will either sink or swim, now is the time to offer help.

SUGGESTIONS:

  • At the beginning of your class, offer to help anyone who might need it.
  • As the semester progress, explain what normally happens during each week of the term.
  • The first semester can be a dangerous time for new students, we don’t wan’t it to be their last.
  • Explaining what academic probation really means can be a much needed wake up call.
  • Remind students when class starts. There are no bells, like they had in high school.
  • Remind your students about your office hours.
  • Take your lunch in a place where your students are eating too. Just being available in a casual place can create an opportunity for an important talk about the college experience.

Next week: Helping First Time College Students

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

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###

SC 185 WELCOMING NEW STUDENTS

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.
The Caring Professor




The Caring Professor

 

Direct download: sc_pod_185.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 12:21pm PDT
Comments[0]

SC 184 Welcoming New Colleagues

We celebrate people when they are leaving, 
but not necessarily when they are arriving. 

We're glad you're here! Not, we're glad you were here.

When you are new to a college...

  • Being a faculty member at a new place is stressful. In fact, the entire new semester is stressful.

How we can help our newest colleagues.

  • Introduce yourself to a new person and offer to help. "I can be a resource for you."
  • Recall what it was like when you were new. What could have helped you?
  • Don't give them extra things to do.
  • Discourage them from volunteering for extra work. We want a first year person to concentrate on teaching.
  • If they were the second choice for the job, don't tell them!
  • Invite them to lunch!

Next week: Welcoming New Students

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_184.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 10:40am PDT
Comments[0]

SC 183 Learning Management Systems

The Professor as Presenter – Learning Management Systems

 Student Caring

PREPARATION IS KEY

  • David interviewed a number of professors at an online university and discovered that for each online class, the professors were paid for 300 hours to prepare their course.
  • Switching to a learning management system overnight is crazy!

TIPS

  • Be attentive to your time in addition to your students time.
  • It is not wise for you to be online and available 24 /7.
  • Spend large amounts of time setting up your course online and making certain that it is working, 100% in all areas.
  • Don’t assume that your current students, in an online class, are the only students seeing the exam as it becomes easy for them to share.
  • Our students today are very comfortable using these learning management systems.
  • Use your management system as your personal assistant.
  • Discover how the software can enable you to teach in new and innovative ways to improve learning for your students.

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

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###

SC 183 LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.
The Caring Professor




The Caring Professor

 

Direct download: sc_pod_183.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 9:35am PDT
Comments[0]

SC 182 How We Use Media

The Professor as Presenter – How We Use Media

 Screen Shot 2016-08-19 at 1.25.57 PM

USE OF MEDIA

  • What are we putting up onto the screen in the classroom?
  • Our students are used to having control of their screens – now we are in control of the content.
  • Our students consume more media in a week than we most likely did in 6 months at their age.

TIPS

  • Just because the media is available, by no means do we have to use it in the classroom.
  • Why spend the time in class “showing,” when you can spend the time in class, “discussing?”
  • Make it clear to your class how you are going to be using media and what you expect them to do while the media is being shown.
  • Daniel doesn’t use a TED TALK as content, rather it is an introduction to the content.

RESOURCES

We recommend the resources produced by Bonnie on her website: Teaching in Higher Ed.

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

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###

SC 182 USE OF MEDIA

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.
The Caring Professor




The Caring Professor

UPCOMING TOPIC IN THIS SERIES:

OUTSIDE OF CLASS EXTENSIONS

  • Learning management systems have become an important part of the learning experience.
  • These computer networks are expanding the space of the classroom.
Direct download: sc_pod_182.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 7:36pm PDT
Comments[0]

THE AUDIENCE IS LISTENING

Daniel tells a story about a teacher who’s tone of voice was always full of anger. (Must Listen)

  • How do our students interpret how we are sounding?
  • We can learn a lot from observing actors who specialize in evoking emotions in an audience by the way their voices sound.
  • As professors, we want our students to think a certain way.

When David teaches his safety lecture, he is dead serious. 

  • Dropping into a parental teacher mode when our students have not performed to our expectations can be very effective.
  • Always strive to connect with your class / audience.

Professors talking to themselves!

  • We can be a legend in our own minds!
  • We don’t want to exclude our students from our class!

How annoying!

  • Be aware of verbal patterns that may be driving your students crazy.
  • Because of our education and experience, we can use terms that our students have no idea what we are talking about. Give them permission to interrupt you.

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

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###

SC 181 HOW DO WE SOUND TO OUR STUDENTS?

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.
The Caring Professor




The Caring Professor

UPCOMING TOPICS IN THIS SERIES:

USE OF MEDIA

  • What are we putting up onto the screen in the classroom?
  • Our students are used to having control of their screens – now we are in control of the content.
  • Our students consume more media in a week than we most likely did in 6 months at their age.

OUTSIDE OF CLASS EXTENSIONS

  • Learning management systems have become an important part of the learning experience.
  • These computer networks are expanding the space of the classroom.
Direct download: sc_pod_181.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 12:26pm PDT
Comments[0]

SC 180 Presentation Materials

The Professor as Presenter – Presentation Materials
This podcast was recorded on August 5, 2016.

– TOPICS DISCUSSED IN THE PODCAST –

PRESENTATION MATERIELS

  • Are we prepared?
  • Do we look prepared?
  • Are we interesting and engaging or do we sound like a textbook?
  • Are our topics appropriate for the form of an in class lecture?

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

Direct download: sc_pod_180.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 10:29pm PDT
Comments[0]

SC 179 Attitude

The Professor as Presenter – Attitude

Student Caring

– TOPICS DISCUSSED IN THE PODCAST –

ATTITUDE

  • What is our attitude?
  • What is our perceived attitude by our students?
  • Are we excited and ready to go?
  • Are we self–confident or self–doubting?

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

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Click this Link to Listen on Stitcher Smart Radio

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###

SC 179 ATTITUDE

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.
The Caring Professor




The Caring Professor

UPCOMING TOPICS IN THIS SERIES:

MATERIEL

  • Are we prepared?
  • Do we look prepared?
  • How is the pace of the class? Am I rushed? Do I finish 15 minutes early?
  • Are we interesting and engaging or do we sound like a textbook?
  • Are our topics appropriate for the form of an in class lecture?

SPEECH

  • How is our language, sound, tone, boredom factor.
  • How do we sound to our students?
  • Our students are experts at hearing people lecture.

USE OF MEDIA

  • What are we putting up onto the screen in the classroom?
  • Our students are used to having control of their screens – now we are in control of the content.
  • Our students consume more media in a week than we most likely did in 6 months at their age.

OUTSIDE OF CLASS EXTENSIONS

  • Learning management systems have become an important part of the learning experience.
  • These computer networks are expanding the space of the classroom.
Direct download: sc_pod_179.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 12:15pm PDT
Comments[0]

SC 178 Are You Lookin' at Me?

The Professor as Presenter – Physical Appearance
This podcast was recorded on July 20, 2016 in a gazebo crawling with ants!

Student Caring - Podcast for Professors

WHAT ARE OUR STUDENTS SEEING?

PHYSICAL

  • What do our students see when we walk into the room?
  • What do we look like and what does that say about us?

(This can also be an endless source of entertainment for our students!)

OUR HUMANNESS:

  • Students make certain assumptions when we walk into the room:
    • Will they understand me?
    • Will they relate to me?
    • Is there a generation gap?
    • Oh, they are young – or old! Does this equate to our experience or not?
  • Students are looking at and analyzing us:
    • Does this person take care of themselves?
    • Are they short or tall?
  • Be aware that students are making judgements about us.
  • The classroom is like a T.V., they are watching and we are the only thing on.
  • Are we professors being viewed as entertainment? Are we professors being viewed as edu–tainment?

We want our students to move away from what we look like
and think about what we are talking about.

OUR PROFESSIONAL ATTIRE:

  • What are we wearing?
  • Is there a professor dress code?
  • Is our approach to be more dressy than our students, to become more serious?
  • Is our approach to dress more like our students, to relate to them better?

WHAT ARE WE CARRYING WHEN WE WALK INTO THE ROOM?:

  • What does what we bring with us say about us? A bag on wheels, a leather briefcase, a backpack?
  • What we carry needs to speak of “organization”.

OUR MANNERISMS:

  • What do we do, that we don’t know we are doing?
  • What mannerisms can enhance or distract from our teaching?
  • Ask someone to video record you teaching a class.
    • Lock your office door.
    • Get a strong Venti Starbucks Flat White.
    • Watch the video recording.

Are we too much of the focus for our students? 

Are we getting in the way of the learning? 

The focus should be on the learning and not on us.

 

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

Click this Link to Subscribe via iTunes

Click this Link to Listen on Stitcher Smart Radio

Click this Link to Subscribe via Google Play

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Direct download: sc_pod_178.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 10:07pm PDT
Comments[0]

SC 177 Proféssormon GO

In honor of the Pokémon GO craze that is sweeping the nation, we feature Proféssormon in the episode.   Proféssormon GO | Student Caring

Image Credit

The Professor as Presenter - Introduction To Our New Series
This podcast was recorded on July 13, 2016 in Sunny Southern California USA

Using the "Backwards Course Design" approach - What are asking the question: What our students experiencing?

  • What are our students seeing?
    • Us, each other, the room, what we present, and of course – what's on their smartphones or outside the window.
  • What are our students hearing?
    • Us, each other, and what we present in an audible form.
  •  What are our students feeling?
    • What are their emotions? What emotions are we guiding them to experience?
  • What are our students thinking and learning?
    • This is where it all comes together.
  • When we get up in front of the classroom we may be thinking:
    • How do I look?
    • How do I sound?

Our "Student Caring" approach is: The audience (Our students) comes first. In this new series we are going to focus on how to get into the heads of your students.

TOPICS IN THE NEW PODCAST SERIES

PHYSICAL

  • What do our students see when we walk into the room?
  • What do we look like and what does that say about us?
  • This can also be an endless source of entertainment for our students!

ATTITUDE

  • What is our attitude?
  • What is our perceived attitude by our students?
  • Are we excited and ready to go?
  • Are we self–confident or self–doubting?

MATERIEL

  • Are we prepared?
  • Do we look prepared?
  • How is the pace of the class? Am I rushed? Do I finish 15 minutes early?
  • Are we interesting and engaging or do we sound like a textbook?
  • Are our topics appropriate for the form of an in class lecture?

SPEECH

  • How is our language, sound, tone, boredom factor.
  • How do we sound to our students?
  • Our students are experts at hearing people lecture.

USE OF MEDIA

  • What are we putting up onto the screen in the classroom?
  • Our students are used to having control of their screens - now we are in control of the content.
  • Our students consume more media in a week than we most likely did in 6 months at their age.

OUTSIDE OF CLASS EXTENSIONS

  • Learning management systems have become an important part of the learning experience.
  • These computer networks are expanding the space of the classroom.

 

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

Click this Link to Subscribe via iTunes

Click this Link to Listen on Stitcher Smart Radio

Click this Link to Subscribe via Google Play

Click this Link to Subscribe via RSS (non-iTunes feed)

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

###

SC 177 Proféssormon GO

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.
The Caring Professor




The Caring Professor

 

Direct download: sc_pod_177.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 7:28pm PDT
Comments[0]

SC 176 Faculty Development

In this podcast we are cheerleaders for your faculty development.

This podcast was recorded on July 1, 2016 in Irvine, California USA
Happy New Fiscal Year!

DEVELOPING OUR SKILLS AS FACULTY:

  • There’s nothing like a good conference! We look to learn how to improve our skills.
  • Conference selection:
    • A wonderful location!
    • A conference that is well funded and offers top speakers.
    • Identifying a time that works with our academic schedule.
  • Take a look at bringing a speaker to your campus to conduct a seminar.
    • This can benefit an entire campus of faculty.

Please share your favorite conference with us and we’ll share them with everyone. david@studentcaring.com

Attending international conferences can open your eyes to teaching techniques that you might be aware of in your country.

Now that budgets are available for the new year, this is a good time to request funds to travel during the upcoming academic year.

 

 

~~~~~

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_176.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 4:12pm PDT
Comments[0]

SC 175 Day One - Reading Your Students

You walk into your class on day one and…

READING THE CLASS ON THE FIRST DAY:

What do we see?

  • The group is usually mixed, some want to be there and some don’t.
  • The students who really don’t want to be there at all tend to stand out.

Understanding:

  • Understanding why they don’t want to be in your class can be a game changer.
  • They might not like the subject, the time of day, and you, yes you!

What we can do to help our students:

  • Try to interpersonally engage them.
  • The second class is a good time to take action on what we have discovered in the first class.
  • Good times to make that personal connection are before or after class and during a break.
  • On the first day, we can give our students an opportunity to write. This will give us valuable insights as to where they are in their life / educational journey.
  • Once a disconnected student has been identified we can let them know that we have office hours and we are available to them.
  • Planning our classes well and making them un predicable sometimes can help to keep them on their toes.
  • Look for a specific way that you can incorporate, into an early class, a topic that your disconnected student has an interest in.

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_175.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 3:22pm PDT
Comments[0]

SC 174 Student Earthquakes

NOTES FROM THE STUDENT CARING PODCAST FOR PROFESSORS

SC 174 
Student Earthquakes

You may be saying to yourself, self, “What’s a Student Earthquake?”

Because Daniel and David live in California, they are sometimes nervous about the BIG ONE. As a result, this topic has been known to arise from time to time in their podcasts, books, and posts. For this podcast and post, it refers to our students when they are about to take a break from college. A.K.A. “Stop Out.”

A STUDENT COMES INTO YOUR OFFICE AND SAYS: “I’M THINKING OF STOPPING OUT.”

Practical Advice:

  • Advise your student to exit properly. Drop your courses, don’t just pack your bags and hit the road.
  • They may be able to obtain a medical withdrawal. They should meet with the registrar to discover their options.
  • If they have their sights set on another university, teach them how to accomplish that transition. Often our student don’t know how to do this.
  • It might be that the best next step for them is to not stop out.

Mentoring:

  • Get a good idea why things are not working out.
  • Confidentially, inquire as to why they are thinking about stopping out.
  • You might discover that they are having only one large problem and everything else is going very well.
  • Offer options to their situation that they may not be aware of.
  • Inquire: Are you having a time problem? Are you having relationship issues? Why do you want to stop?
  • You can offer to write a letter of recommendation for them.
  • You can stay in touch with them, even though they have left college. “How are you doing, are you able to return to college?”
  • Remind your student about what you have seen them to well. They can really use that encouragement.
  • Pause, take time to talk to them when they need it the most.

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_174.mp3
Category:Education -- posted at: 5:00pm PDT
Comments[0]

SC 173 Helping Students Adjust to the New Prof. – YOU!

NOTES FROM THE STUDENT CARING PODCAST FOR PROFESSORS

 

 

How to help our students adjust to a new professor.

Your arrival at a new university might be very difficult for continuing students.
Student: “What do you mean professor Jones is gone?” “Who is this new professor anyways? I’m doomed, doomed I say, doomed.”
Moreover, we are the new professor at the beginning of every semester.

Our students are usually experiencing other new professors at the same time.

How we can help:

  • Acknowledge that they are experiencing a change and that can be difficult them.
  • Communicate up front with your students about your teaching style.
  • Install confidence in your students about the change of professors.
  • Our students learn subjects from us as the unique persons that we are.
  • Don’t judge yourself by how much the students miss the previous professor.
  • Recognize that our students will compare us to the previous professor.

Your purpose as a professor is not to be liked, it’s to connect with
those students who your naturally going to connect with
and also to connect with those students
who really need your help.

~~~~~

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_173.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 12:09pm PDT
Comments[0]

SC 172 Helping Student Athletes

NOTES FROM THE STUDENT CARING PODCAST FOR PROFESSORS

Helping Student Athletes | Student Caring

 

HELPING OUR STUDENTS WHO ARE IN SPORTS.

  • This can be a sore topic for some professors. We are here to help.
  • Unrealistic expectations:
    • Sports, in high school, are extremely important to parents. Sports can help with college admissions and scholarships.
    • College is about much more than just sports.
  • From a professors perspective:
    • We want our students to do well in all areas.
    • We don’t want our sports students to focus 100% on their sport at the expense of their education.
    • Your education is going to help you succeed in life.
    • Your educational goals are the most important ones during the college years.
  • Sports Students Strengths
    • Sports students understand teamwork.
    • Sports students have self discipline.
    • Sports students understand personal health.
  • Sports Students Concerns
    • Sports students may need to miss many classes to participate in their sport.
    • Sports students can surround themselves with just fellow sports students.

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_172.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 11:11am PDT
Comments[0]

SC 171 Teaching Students in the Arts

NOTES FROM THE STUDENT CARING PODCAST FOR PROFESSORS

Teaching Students in the Arts

 

HELPING OUR STUDENTS WHO ARE IN THE ARTS.

  • A concern… Sometimes students in the arts are not as concerned about straight academic work.
  • They may not see how their other classes can help them in life.
  • Students in the arts sometimes have complicated schedules.
  • Students will have periods of time, usually just before a performance, when they are 100% not focused on your class.
  • We can help them by being predicable with our course schedules.
  • If our students can let us know when they are performing, it will give us an an insight as to what they are experiencing during a particular week.
  • Arts students have a great deal of stress about graduating.
  • Arts students have transferable skills:
    • They can speak in front of an audience without passing out!
    • They can collaborate.
    • They can meet deadlines.
    • They have people and communication skills.
  • We can help these students by showing them how the subject that we are teaching can help them in the arts.
  • Skills in the arts do not always lead to a career in the arts.

 

~~~~~

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_171.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:48pm PDT
Comments[0]

SC 170 Helping Employed Students

NOTES FROM THE STUDENT CARING PODCAST FOR PROFESSORS

SC 170 Helping Employed Students

 

HELPING STUDENTS WHO ARE ALREADY EMPLOYED WHEN THEY ENTER COLLEGE.

  • Daniel knows of a full time student who is working 70 hours per week!
  • Ask your student, who may be having difficulties: “How much do you need to be working?”
  • We find that many students are working more than they need to. Delayed gratification is not easy for any of us.
  • Encourage your student to put their education near the top of their list of priorities.
  • Enlighten your students about income possibilities of a future job.
  • Encourage your students to look for work on campus.
  • Many employers are “college student friendly.”
  • The work schedule needs to be flexible – around the class schedule.
  • When our class schedule is predicable, it helps our students plan around work.

 

~~~~~

All Podcasts via This Website

Click this Link to Subscribe via iTunes

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

###

SC 170 HELPING EMPLOYED STUDENTS

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.
The Caring Professor




The Caring Professor

 

Direct download: sc_pod_170.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:23pm PDT
Comments[0]

SC 169 Teaching International Students

NOTES FROM THE STUDENT CARING PODCAST FOR PROFESSORS

Teaching International Students

Our research and reference source for this podcast is from the University of Virginia: Strategies For Teaching International Students

CTE-Logo-Horiz-Color-Tagline-Web-Sized

GENERAL PRINCIPLES

  • Be explicit about your expectations and try to give examples or model what you are talking about.
  • Focus on meaning first and grammar and style later.
  • Stress fluency in communication along with correctness.
  • Try not to foster the student’s fear of errors.
  • Reinforce the student’s strengths while explaining what he/she still needs to work on.
  • Recognize that students may be differently acculturated to classroom situations.
  • Don’t assume that a student who looks “foreign” is an international student or that one who exhibits writing difficulties is necessarily a non-native speaker.

IN THE CLASSROOM:

When students make unclear remarks, paraphrase them before building on them (“so you are saying that . . .?”). This gives such students an opportunity to correct you if you have not understood what was meant; other students also understand the comment and so are less likely to ignore it. To avoid singling out international students, apply this technique to American students’ comments as well.

MAKE SURE STUDENTS UNDERSTAND DIRECTIONS AND ASSIGNMENTS.

Students from many cultures-and many individuals-believe it is polite to nod in response to someone’s words. When such a nod masks lack of comprehension, difficulties arise. If students have misunderstood previous directions, check with them individually after class about future assignments. Instead of asking, “Do you understand this assignment?” say, “Tell me what you need to do for Wednesday.” You can clarify directions for all students by having a volunteer rephrase them during class.

WRITE IT DOWN!

Use visual aids and write down key terms during lectures or while giving directions. This will help non-native speakers significantly with their comprehension of the material.

Let students who hesitate to speak in class contribute first in small groups or through electronic discussion groups on Instructional Toolkit.
For students who hesitate to speak on the spur of the moment, provide assignments or questions that the student can prepare beforehand. To avoid favoritism, you can give these assignments or questions to all students.

~~~~~

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_169.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:23am PDT
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SC 168 Teaching Students With Learning Disabilities

NOTES FROM THE STUDENT CARING PODCAST FOR PROFESSORS

SC 168 TEACHING STUDENTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES

Our research and reference source for this podcast is the Learning Disabilities Association of America

Student Caring

Legal Rights of College Students with LD

Academic accommodations are required by law for eligible college students with LD. Accommodations are changes in the learning and testing environments that give college students with LD an equal opportunity to learn. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and its amendments (ADAAA) require that reasonable accommodations be made available to college students who have current documentation of learning disabilities and who request learning and/or testing accommodations.

Student Responsibilities

Student responsibilities include the following:

  • To self-identify as a person with a disability to the disability services office at the college or university.
  • To provide up-to-date documentation of the disability to the disability services office.
  • To request academic accommodations that will insure access to information and testing on an equal level with students who do not have disabilities.
  • To self-identify to faculty as a student with a disability and provide them
    with a copy of the Individual Student Profile developed with the disability services office.
  • To remind faculty in a timely manner of academic accommodations required for tests and assignments.
  • To ultimately accept responsibility for his or her successful education. This includes maintaining satisfactory academic levels, attending classes, completing assignments, behaving appropriately, and communicating regularly with the appropriate office and/or individual regarding specific needs.

Faculty Responsibilities

If students request instructional and/or testing accommodations in a class, they must disclose the need for the accommodations to the instructor and give the instructor any documentation provided by the disability services office, typically a letter from that office validating the need for the specified accommodations. Students do not have to disclose their disabilities to their instructor, only the need for accommodations.

The instructors’ responsibilities include the following:

  • To allow students to disclose their disabilities in an appropriate and confidential place.
  • To acknowledge the rights of students with dignity and respect.
  • To maintain the integrity of academic standards.
  • To maintain student confidentiality at all times.
  • To provide reasonable instructional and/or testing accommodations.

~~~~~

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Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

###

SC 168 TEACHING STUDENTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.
The Caring Professor




The Caring Professor

Direct download: sc_pod_168.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 2:50pm PDT
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SC 167 Going to College for the First Time

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 167 Going to College for the First Time

We invite you to check out our appearances page.  We offer faculty presentations on the topics of "Student Caring" / "Student Success" and "Effective Teaching" New, this year is our presentation for parents of high school and college students, "What Professors Wish Parents Knew About College". We would love to visit you and your colleagues at your college.

 

Going to College for the First Time / Prof. Daniel de Roulet

Most of your education—especially the last four years—has been pointing to this moment.  But now what?  What should you expect from going away to college in the fall, and what can you do this summer to get ready?

1. Close the door on high school and focus on the future.  We know this isn’t easy.  You’re leaving behind friends, family, significant others, the familiarity of your home and your town/suburb/city—in some cases, country—to start a new life, and it’s hard to say goodbye.  On the other hand, there may be some advantages to leaving some of these things behind, and college is a good excuse to make the break.  We’re just saying.

There are few times when people have the opportunity to start life anew, even to reinvent themselves (on-line role-playing games excluded).  Are there things you didn’t like about your high school life?  Are there things you didn’t like about you in high school?  Have you been interested in areas you have never had the chance to try out?  Do you want to redefine your relationship with your parents?  Now’s your chance.

2. Learn as much as you can about your new environment.  Although nothing substitutes for actually living through a new experience, finding out about your new environment with soften the culture shock that many students feel at the beginning of college.  Get on line and see what you can find out about the college’s location and surrounding community, its campus, its students and activities, and your professors.  Get out your schedule of classes for the fall and try to find the buildings—get a sense for whether your walk from class to class will be one minute or fifteen.  Find you residence hall on the map and try to find some pictures of the rooms.  Visit your professors’ websites (most easily found through department websites) and see what their interests and expertise are.

3. Do some pre-course work.  Sometimes the first week of classes is a little overwhelming, especially in terms of finding out how much you’ll have to read and what your assignments will be. Find your course syllabi on-line, if they are available and up-to-date; see what books are required for your courses at the bookstore, especially paying attention to the edition of the textbook required.   If you find the syllabi, read them repeatedly, so that some of the information becomes second hand to you before your classes begin.  Consider buying the recommended edition of the book before you get to your college and do a little introductory skimming and reading.  You might get a good deal on the books, and you’ll avoid some long lines during the first week.

4. Begin to make a calendar for the year.  Once you obtain your course syllabi, note key exam and assignments dates—these notes will help you manage your time, decrease your number of surprises, and help you to decide how to best balance study and social events.  Also, write in important family and friend dates—birthdays, anniversaries, and the like.

A little work in the summer can make for a smoother transition in the fall.   And enjoy your summer—outside of work and thinking about college, find time to revel, rest, and recharge.

Recent high school graduates:  what concerns do you have about going to college?

 

~~~~~

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_167.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 5:38pm PDT
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SC 166 Integrated Teaching With the Field Trip

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

Teaching Techniques for Today’s Students
SC 166 Integrated Teaching With the Field Trip

Daniel shares how his sixth grade field trip influenced his life.

David’s research on the topic of our upcoming book, “What Professors Wish Parents Knew About College” reveled this quote:

One day she happened to sign up for a day trip from Scripps to Tijuana, Mexico, to help do some painting and other charitable work in an especially impoverished neighborhood. When she got there, she recalled, I held a baby who could barely breathe, and the mother didn’t have the money to take the baby to the doctor, and you could literally see the United States on the other side of the border. I was just blown away. The moment stayed with her, and during her sophomore year, she applied for a grant that would give her the funds necessary to live in Tijuana for the summer and work with indigent children there.
She got it.

Excerpt from: Bruni, Frank. “Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be.”

The field trip gives you an opportunity to make the message of the class very real.

Creating a college fiend trip that will maximize your students learning.

  • If there will be expenses involved, build those into the lab fee.
  • Find the best day in the semester for the field trip.
  • A field trip can create, for your students, significant learning experiences.
  • Utilize the resources, human and physical, available to you in your geographic area.

Daniel interviews David about his “Arts Day” – mega field trip experience.

  • Prepare your students for the field trip by educating them about the topic ahead of time.
  • Advertise the date of the field trip, well in advance.
  • Create a field trip that is highly educational and fun.
  • Think about logistical items:
    • Cost
    • Tickets
    • Transportation
    • Meals
    • Learning Goals and Materials.
  • Be prepared with a “PLAN B” for students who can’t make, or miss, the field trip.
  • Followup the field trip with an in-class assignment that maximized the experience.

 

~~~~~

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

###

SC 166 Integrated Teaching With the Field Trip

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.
The Caring Professor




The Caring Professor

Direct download: sc_pod_166.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:22am PDT
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SC 165 Teaching With Homework

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

Teaching Techniques for Today’s Students
SC 165 Teaching With Homework

Teaching With Homework

Ways we can improve teaching with homework.

  • Daniel asked his class: “Do you think differently because of your technology and social media? How do you manage your tasks?” Answer: “Our phones play a role in distracting us from concentrating on important tasks, like homework.”
  • Distraction, for our students, is the enemy of homework.
  • What can we do about this? Not much! It’s up to the student to develop their self discipline.
  • High School AP (Advanced Placement) programs are burning our students out before the get to us. Watch the film: RACE TO NOWHERE…  (Click on the picture below) Prepare to be disturbed.

Race to Nowhere Film

Homework Reading

  • Our students seem to want to do as little reading as possible.
  • David heavily integrates required (and graded) reading assignments into his courses.
  • Daniel will require his homework assignments to be hand written. This gets them off the computer and decreases their distraction level.

Isn’t this bizarre, that in this age of technology, we are finding ways for our students to not use it? – Dr. Daniel de Roulet

  • There is something, almost artistic when you are crafting the letters with your own hand vs. just typing them on the keyboard.
  • Make sure that you are giving the students feedback on their homework.
  • Impress on your students that they must buy the textbook – else, “You are dead-in-the-water before you begin.”
  • Daniel sees a lot of his students reading on their phones. This presents a variety of concerns about note-taking, comprehension, and distractions.

A lot of students who spend time on the their phones are complaining of loneliness.

How do we integrate homework into the day-to-day class meetings?

  • Require students to do the reading before the topic is discussed in class. Knowing that they will be involved in a discussion beforehand will prompt them to be prepared.
  • Accountability at the beginning of class is a good approach. (In the podcast version, listen to Daniel tell his story about “Standing Students!”

 

Homework is about fostering a continued learning experience outside of the class in their daily lives.

CARNEGIE RULE:  3 hours of work outside of class for every hour in class.

 

Next Week: The Field Trip

~~~~~

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Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_165.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:52pm PDT
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SC 164 Teaching in the Lab

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

Teaching Techniques for Today's Students
SC 164 Teaching in the Lab

SC 164 Teaching in the Lab

Teaching in the lab can be very different, depending on your discipline. Daniel teaches in a writing lab and David in the theater. In this podcast, we explore (lab) teaching techniques for today's students.

Lab facts:

  • An educational lab is given birth to when the course is designed and proposed.
  • Some courses have a lab requirement built in and for some, it is separate.
  • Often, a lab fee will be required when there are expendable materials required.

Lab teaching in a collaborative environment.

  • Colleagues will say to (Theater) David, "You can't teach that, they learn by doing."
  • Both can be achieved in carefully constructed labs and courses.
  • In a deadline driven environment, the student needs to learn under pressure.
  • When the professor and student are sitting side by side, the opportunities for collaboration increase.
  • Students get excited when they are put in charge of something.
  • DISADVANTAGE:  The pressure that comes with a deadline for a public performance can place me in the middle of making a decision that is either best for the student or best for the audience. My position is always: Our primary focus is on the student's learning, not the show. Our product (if we think that way) is the student who walks across the commencement stage, not the performance occurring on the stage. The theatre lab, including the performance, is a learning environment.
  • ADVANTAGE: Very quickly, when a student has a success, they experience a boost of self confidence.

"For a student, the classroom can be a lonely place." – Daniel

The lab: An opportunity for individual instruction and connection.

  • Look for ways you can encourage your students, one on one in the lab.
  • The demeanor of the professor in the lab is really important. More conversational gives the student an opportunity to express what's on their mind. Our students will see the lab as a safe place rather than a place where they feel like they have to perform.
  • If grading is involved in the lab, a syllabus needs to be in place.
  • The biggest advantage of the lab is one-on-one time with the professor. (Office hours seem to be a dying art!)

 

Next: Homework

~~~~~

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_164.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 4:29pm PDT
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SC 163 How to Lead a Good Discussion

Teaching Techniques for Today’s Students
SC 163 How to Lead a Good Discussion

 

In the syllabus for Prof. David Pecoraro’s classes:

Discussion is a valuable and inspiring means for revealing the diversity of opinion that lies just below the surface of almost any complex issue. Although there are many ways to learn, discussion is a particularly wonderful way to explore supposedly settled questions and to develop a fuller appreciation for the multiplicity of human experience and knowledge. To see a topic come alive (The emphasis is mine) as diverse and complex views multiply is one of the most powerful experiences we can have as learners and teachers. In a discussion where participants feel their views are valued and welcomed, it is impossible to ween class sessions. – Stephen D. Brookfield 

Difficulties that we encounter:

  • You have to know where your discussion will be going before you begin or the topic will wander.
  • Our students struggle with the lost art of conversation. Daniel recommends: Reclaiming Conversation by Sherry Turkle.9781594205552
  • Most of our students know how to speak, but not necessarily converse.

How can we prepare our students for a good discussion?

  • Prepare the students for the upcoming discussion by putting them into smaller groups and give them some questions to think about. Have them write down their answers. This is followed by an all class discussion.
  • Establish some ground rules that work for you.
    • When someone is talking, you can’t talk over them. (We are also teaching our students how to listen.)
    • Whatever your opinion is, it is safe to express. “Can we all agree to that?”
    • You may disagree with the professor as long as you articulate why you disagree.
    • Always support your opinions.
    • Everybody speaks once before anyone speaks a second time.
  • The professor can act as a secretary, one who does not comment, rather moderates.

Discussions can go bad when students are not prepared with the reading or topic.

  • You need to make sure they are prepared before the discusssion.
  • One way is to ask the student to leave if they have not done the reading. (You could have a time-out!)
  • Set up a discussion board on the course management system ahead of time.
  • A key to success: Write engaging questions.

How to close out a discussion.

  • At the end of a discussion, don’t end the class. End with a reflection on what has been discussed and learned. “How were your opinions challenged?” “What perspectives do you now have?” Ask your students to write their answers down for the beginning of the next class.

Professor preparation for a discussion.

  • Take some time to pre-determine outcomes:
    • Here is where I want the discussion to go.
    • Here are the 3 things I want them to cover.
    • I want my students to get to a certain point by the end of the discussion.

If you are new to discussion teaching – FEAR NOT. Just begin and continue to fine tune as you go forth.

 

~~~~~

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Next: Teaching in the lab.

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_163.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 4:45pm PDT
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SC 162 A Lecture for Today’s Students

Teaching Techniques for Today’s Students
SC 162 A Lecture for Today’s Students

Background

  • The students in our classrooms today are used to learning at a fast pace. This is evidenced by the speed that they multitask, text and learn via computers.
    • TED TALKS (Technology, Entertainment and Design) are a good example of this.
  • By November 2012, TED talks had been watched over one billion times worldwide. Not all TED talks are equally popular, however. Those given by academics tend to be watched more online, and art and design videos tend to be watched less than average. SOURCE
  • These lectures are short and entertaining. We think of these as lectures that are repackaged for the students we teach today.
  • Rethinking the Way College Students Are Taught  by Emily Hanford    It’s a typical scene: a few minutes before 11:00 on a Tuesday morning and about 200 sleepy-looking college students are taking their seats in a large lecture hall – chatting, laughing, calling out to each other across the aisles. Class begins with a big “shhhh” from the instructor.This is an introductory chemistry class at a state university. For the next hour and 15 minutes, the instructor will lecture and the students will take notes. By the end of class, the three large blackboards at the front of the room will be covered with equations and formulas.

    Students in this class say the instructor is one of the best lecturers in the department. Still, it’s not easy to sit through a long lecture, says student Jimmy Orr. “When it’s for an hour you kind of zone out for a little bit,” he says.

    Student Marly Dainton says she doesn’t think she’ll remember much from this class.

    “I’m going to put it to short-term memory,” she says. Once she takes the exam, Dainton expects she’ll forget a lot of what she learned.  SOURCE

  • OUR FEAR:  “How much will our students retain from our lectures?”
  • Students need to be reminded in different media; discussion, out of class work, and lectures, continuously.
  • Never do anything in a class for more than eight minutes without a change.

From our students perspective…

  • The attention span is not what it used to be.
  • More and more, we are in the age of multimedia.
  • Students are not necessarily taking notes when we lecture.

Constructing our lectures

  • We need to construct the class in such a way that the lecture is not the beginning and end of the information they need to learn – and communicate this to them, regularly.
  • Very carefully, come up with a plan which includes reading questions in preparation for the in class discussions and lectures. We need to get to them to that place of deeper learning.
  • In our culture, we do so much multi-media learning that merely peaks our interest (YouTubeNetflixAmazon TV) but doesn’t deepen our understanding.
  • The lecture needs to be constantly connected to what’s going on outside of class.

When you are lecturing, you need to get them involved. You are someone who is much more interesting than a text book!

  • How well are students paying attention to us during our lectures? If they are not paying attention during one part, it’s not their fault, it’s ours! Take notes after class and adjust accordingly.
  • TIP:  Analyze an excellent TED TALK and structure your lecture accordingly.
  • Humor is an excellent tool to regain their attention. It also humanizes you–again!
  • Sticking to your carefully planned class schedule doesn’t always create the deepest learning. Read the room and adjust according to the mental atmosphere of your students.

Next: A discussion on discussions.

~~~~~

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Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_162.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:36am PDT
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SC 161 Teaching Techniques for Today's Students

SC 161 Teaching Techniques for Today’s Students

~~~~~

Student Caring NEWS:

•  REMINDER:  Our book: The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching is on sale for only $12.99 (Digital)
•  Who is this book for?
Anyone looking to learn more about teaching in Higher Education.
Anyone who needs to improve their teaching evaluations.

If you are concerned about making tenure or getting hired as a full time professor, this book is for you.
Caring-Prof-cover-Version-21
Download_on_iBooks_Badge_US-UK_110x40_090513
images
downloadBox

The Directors of the Student Caring Project bring 50 years of combined classroom experience to offer new and experienced teachers ways to thrive in today’s college classroom. Pecoraro and de Roulet focus on understanding the needs and challenges of today’s students, tested methods of successful teaching and class triage, and trends in education. The goal of the book is a rewarding, effective and rigorous experience for students and professors alike.

The first section of the book, Teaching 101, looks at student-professor interactions, discussing:

  • The changing landscape of higher education and why many students feel disconnected from their educational experiences.
  • A brief outline of the expectations of students today compared to the expectations of professor’s university experiences.
  • A look at the financial landscapes that confront students and interfere with learning.
  • Academic preparedness.
  • The difficulties of teaching in a culture in which negotiation sometimes replaces hard work.
  • The importance of establishing clear and wise boundaries with students.
  • Establishing and keeping connections with students in the classroom during the semester to improve student learning.

Teaching 102 discusses putting together and nurturing successful courses based on a foundation of care for your students’ academic growth and well-being. Subjects include:

  • Intentionally setting the tone and establishing rapport instead of letting the frenetic first days of the term set the tone of a course.
  • Reinforcing tone and cementing expectations during the first course meetings.
  • The art of effective record keeping to track student progress.
  • Learning-goal-oriented course design, organization, and reflection.
  • Recognizing symptoms and causes of a class “going bad.” The need to carefully diagnose symptoms, understand student perceptions, and reactions, and see how the symptoms can negatively affect a class.
  • Changing the trajectory of a class that has gone off track. Strategies include responding early, checking in with students, not allowing the class to drift from its goals, and building a community of colleagues who are willing to discuss course remedies in confidence.
  • Ending a class well. Ways in which students can be actively involved in the end-of-term assessments of their knowledge, understanding, and skills. Preparing for a final course meeting that leaves students both clear about how the course’s goals have been met and confident in seeing how the skills of a particular academic discipline may be applied to their education.

Teaching 103 presents advanced strategies and background for addressing trends and difficult situations in education today, and for helping students succeed:

  • Classes that encourage critical thinking and introduce students to the expectations of college academic life.
  • The stages of intellectual development most students will experience, and how to appropriately move them along that continuum in preparation for college work and life beyond college.
  • Caring for students in online settings, addressing online learning’s additional challenges in knowing one’s audience, fostering community, and keeping a course on track.
  • Strategies for addressing difficult student encounters.
  • “Career Directions and Your Students’ Daily Bread” introduces students to the idea of a vocation, and discusses practical aspects of entering the work force, internships and apprenticeships, and graduate work.

 

GOOGLE Play
•  Now, for the first time, you can access our podcast via Google Play. Click to subscribe.

 Teaching Techniques for Today’s Students
– An introduction to the next five podcast topics:

  1. A lecture for today’s students
  2. How to lead a good discussion
  3. Teaching in the lab
  4. Using homework well
  5. How to manage a college field trip

 

All Podcasts via This Website

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_161.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:23pm PDT
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SC 160 How to be a Happier Professor

SC 160 How to be a Happier Professor
Part Two of “Getting Behind” – Prevention
~~~~~

How We Can Avoid – Getting Behind:

•  Don’t answer immediately to a request for a commitment to your time. Take a day and think it over.
•  Watch out for those committee members who will assign you some work if you are not at the meeting.
•  Politely reserve the rights to your time.
•  Divide up those big piles of work into bite sized tasks.
•  Don’t try to grade all of those papers in one night!
•  Are you the type of person who feels that you work better under pressure? Be careful.
•  Viewing your upcoming week, at all times, can help you gauge your workload.
•  Sit down, once a month to take a look at the month ahead, you’ll feel more in control.
•  As a last resort, you can call in sick for a day! This can provide a much needed stress relief.

How much work do I need to do to fulfill this obligation?
•  Sometimes the amount of work you put in (comments on papers) can overwealm the student.
•  Keep the amount of work that you give people, manageable.
•  Do good work, but do reasonable amounts of work as well.

All Podcasts

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_160.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:09am PDT
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SC 159 Getting Behind – Diagnosis and Prescription

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 159 Getting Behind – the Diagnosis and Prescription
~~~~~

Getting Behind – Diagnosis:

How can we identify when we are behind?
•  You know….   that dark feeling that comes over us when we realize that the papers are piling up.
•  The notion that we are just feeling overwhelmed and we are not sure what’s going on – dazed and confused.

TIP: Never lie to a judge when you are on jury duty. (Listen to David’s true story)

Reasons why professors can get behind.
• The rest of the university!  Those items that are not under our direct control.
• Over stuffing your syllabi to teach as much as possible.
• Saying “yes” to an additional commitment. “What was I thinking?

What can you do when you recognize that you are behind?
• Hit the pause button and take a mini retreat so you can identify your priorities.
• But, I don’t have time for a retreat! Bad sign. (You don’t want to discover yourself, looking between your feet at the cars behind you approach as you peer through the back window of the paramedic van.)
• In the David Allen book, “Getting Things Done,” he suggest doing a review, once a week.
• Sometimes we don’t want to clear our plates. After all, I am better at this than others and no, not me – I am not egotistic.
•  Ask yourself: Say, “Self, is the project really that important that I can’t give it to someone else?”
• And: “Is my teaching suffering because I am doing these other things?”
• Clear your schedule for the next three or four days.
• It is important to figure out how you got behind and put into place ways to prevent them in the future. – our next episode!

Direct download: sc_pod_159.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 12:56pm PDT
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SC 158 10 Surefire Ways to Piss Off Your Professor

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 158 10 Surefire Ways to Piss Off Your Professor

 

The number one selling higher education book on Amazon:

The Secrets of College Success / Second Edition / Lynn F. Jacobs & Jeremy S. Hyman

Secrets_2ndEd_Cover

 

http://www.thesecretsofcollegesuccess.com

10 Surefire Ways to Piss Off Your Professor

  1. Making excuses for missing class.
  2. Misbehaving in class.
  3. Challenging your professor publicly.
  4. Disputing a grade like a "mad dog."
  5. Seeming really stupid.
  6. Giving lame excuses for handing in a late paper or missing an exam.
  7. Treating the professor like your servant.
  8. Plagiarizing in super-obvious ways..
  9. Comparing your prof to other profs.
  10. Going over your prof's head.

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Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_158.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:04pm PDT
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SC 157 The 13 Warning Signs of a Bad Professor

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

The 13 Warning Signs of a Bad Professor
~~~~~

The number one selling higher education book on Amazon:

The Secrets of College Success / Second Edition / Lynn F. Jacobs & Jeremy S. Hyman

Secrets_2ndEd_Cover 

http://www.thesecretsofcollegesuccess.com

The 13 Warning Signs of a Bad Professor

  1. The professor is deadly boring.
  2. The professor is bummed out.
  3. The professor is condescending, combative, or full of him-or herself.
  4. The professor shows favoritism.
  5. The professor doesn’t give out a syllabus–or gives out a one-paragraph syllabus that is just the course description from the Web.
  6. The professor isn’t clear about the requirements and how much they count.
  7. The professor has incredibly petty rules.
  8. The professor can’t fill the whole class period.
  9. The professor seems unsure about the material.
  10. The professor presents the material in a confused or obscure way.
  11. The professor uses the class as a political platform.
  12. The professor never involves the students.
  13. The professor has no passion for the subject.

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Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_157.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 1:08pm PDT
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SC 156 Nota Bene Student Attendance

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 156 Nota Bene Student Attendance
~~~~~

Trends in class attendance

  • When we were in college, people pretty much attended class.
  • Today, we do see a strong motivation on the part of our students to be diligent about class attendance.
  • You can also tell, how attendance at your college is going on any give day, by the amount of cars in the parking lot.

Best practices

  • Communicate and enforce the college attendance policy to your students.
  • If we are consistent about taking role, that will communicate that we are in fact, watching and keeping track.
  • "Has anyone seen Mike in a while?" Everyone will take note - that you are taking note.
  • Make sure that students have regular assignments to turn in when they come to class. They only get credit for the paper when they come to class. Our students need our help with the importance of attendance.
  • Class: "By the way, if you arrive 10 minutes late or leave early, that counts as an absence." Everyone will get very quiet.
  • Make sure that your syllabus is not all "BARK."
  • We have a duty to make class engaging and interesting.
  • When a student misses our class and they contact us, we need to hold them accountable for the missed work. Don't enable the student by making it easy for them.

A colleagues approach - Lisa Alvarez

  • "I'm concerned about you because I think you are failing my class."
  • "I'm glad you came to see me today, but I have to tell you, I need to be fare to everyone in the class."

Ask yourself: Are you making them a better student or are you preparing them to be a better bad student?

 

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Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

 

Direct download: sc_pod_156.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 5:55pm PDT
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SC 155 No.4  What Your Students Probably Don't Know

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

Syllabus – Part Four
~~~~~

Office hours

  • We find that students are communicating with us via emails instead of coming into our offices.
  • We need to let our students know what “Office Hours” actually are and what they are for.
  • Help your students by telling them specifically where your office is located.
  • We invite you to join us with our new service for students:  “One Minute Office Hour

College services available to students

  • Even though our students have access to the resources available, they often forget or do not know where to go for help.
  • It can be helpful for us to verbally explain to our students what the health center can and can not do for them.
  • Tell them what type of services the on campus police department has to offer.

Digital technology

  • Explain to your students how crucial it is that the regularly check their college email address. We should not assume that they are all aware of this.
  • Freshmen may need extra help accessing the course management system.

Please join us next week for section number four in the syllabus series.

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Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_155.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 11:14am PDT
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SC 154 No.3  What Your Students Probably Don't Know

Syllabus – Part Three
~~~~~

Open syllabus syllabus quiz

  • Daniel gives the “Open Syllabus Syllabus Quiz” A.K.A.: OSSQ to his class to encourage them to think about why they are there and what the learning process will be.

Sequence of assignments.

  • A chronological listing of each assignment, what the topic will be, and how it will be assessed.
  • Without a list of what the assignments are, there will be anxiety and confusion, both for the students and the professor.

Grades

  • Often, our students do not know what grades they have received and how they are doing in your class.
  • A syllabus needs to list what the assignments are and how they are weighted on day one.
  • We want our students to manage their own grades.

Late assignment policies

  • If students don’t know what your policies are regarding late work this will create many, many questions.
  • Spell out your policy: Assignments are not accepted late. Assignments may be turned in before the deadline.
  • A student may assume that your policies are just like those in another class.

Please join us next week for section number four in the syllabus series.

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Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_154.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:36am PDT
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SC 153 No. 2  What Your Students Probably Don't Know

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

Syllabus – Part Two
Rules for Learning

Class attendance

  • Communicate to your students that the class is a community and their attendance is essential to form a learning community. Your fellow students will need to work harder if you are not in class.
  • Policy: If the student misses more than 8 hours of instruction, the instructor drops them from the course.
  • Arriving late or leaving early is a tardy. 3 tardies equal 1 absence.

Meaningful class participation

  • Just “showing up” doesn’t mean that you are attending the class.
  • You need to come to class prepared for all in class discussions and activities.
  • If you do not come prepared to class, you may be dismissed for the day.
  • We want our students to be active not passive learners.

Academic dishonesty

  • BE ADVISED:  There are many online resources for students who want to purchase assignments.
  • You can try, but you can’t buy learning.
  • List the academic policy of the college.
  • Explain to your students that you will report any instance of academic dishonesty.
  • Reference: How To Cheat In College and What to do About It

 

 

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Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_153.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:30am PDT
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SC 152 No. 1 What Your Students Probably Don't Know

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

 

Book recommendation from Dr. Daniel de Roulet

Adulting: How to Become a Grown-up in 468 Easy(ish) Steps

510VK8Q1dbL._SX328_BO1,204,203,200_

 

  • Young adults today don’t seem to be launching all that well.
  • We see this every day in our classrooms.
  • We make assumptions about what our students know about college.

How to help our students understand some essential information in the course syllabus.

  • How we address the syllabus on day one is key.
  • When the answer a student asks us verbally, is on the syllabus, we need to refer them to that document instead of answering it for them. We want them to look at the syllabus often and use it as an essential resource.

Ways we can help our students know and understand what is on the syllabus.

  • The syllabus quiz. If you don’t pass, the quiz, you are dropped from the course.
  • Reading the syllabus to the class. (We do not recommend this.)

Your email address

  • This is essential.
  • Let your students know the best way they can reach you.

Office hours

  • We don’t see that students actually know what “office hours” are.
  • It is rare for our students to utilize our office hours. (This is one reason why we created the “One Minute Office Hour.”
  • Write a clear statement about why and when you have office hours.

What is a syllabus?

  • Our students may not know what a syllabus is.
  • For reasons not known to us, students avoid reading this document.
  • In writing, and verbally, we need to tell our students why the syllabus is important.
  • If we focus on the importance of the syllabus in relationship to their grade, we can get their attention.

What is this course?

  • Explain to your class what the course is about, they might not understand past, “I just know that I have to take this course.”
  • We find that our students walk into our class on the first day and that’s when they begin to figure out what the course is about.
  • We need to think about our class, what we know and also understand what our students don’t know.

Key dates

  • Give your students essential and important dates.
  • Tell your students to put these down in their daily planners.
  • Tell your students to buy and use a daily planner or refer them to this video.

 

Course materiels 

  • Students, for a variety of reasons do not get all of the required course materials.
  • Tell your students what it means to have a book on reserve in the library.
  • Students tend to spend as little money as possible on the text book. Often this is a disaster.
  • Access to the online course management system and access to a printer is essential.
  • It is good idea for our students to buy a folder for each class and put all information in them.
  • It is in your best interest to purchase a day-timer and use it daily.

 We wish for you all, good first weeks of instruction.

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_152.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 5:34pm PDT
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