Student Caring - A Podcast for Professors
Join professors de Roulet and Pecoraro as they encourage professors to achieve success.
SC 143 Teaching Styles: Teacher or Student Centered?

NEWS / Watch for our podcast on the new Google Play network. Coming soon!

STUDENT CARING MOMENT

Stay in touch with your former students. We find that Facebook can help us to be available to our students who want to share their life experiences with us.

Our former student can provide a perspective of what life is like after college to current students.

Teaching Styles

Teacher centered approach

  • Often thought of as "Old School"
  • The professor lectures, the students listen and take notes.
  • The teach is the formal authority and expert.

Student centered approach

  • Inquiry based learning
  • The teacher is working more as a coach or facilitator.
  • The teacher is seen as the more experienced learner among peers.

We use a combination of these two styles.

  • We remember "The Sage on the Stage" and overhead projectors!
  • Our professors were usually the ones who wrote the textbook we were learning from.
  • There is high value to a person who is an expert and who writes text books.
  • Lecturing for 18 weeks can be sure fire way to put your students to sleep.
  • At some point, the professor needs to be the expert in the classroom.
  • A variety in teaching styles can be achieved with a variety courses with a four-year program.

Length of class time dictates that we vary our teaching styles.

  • A five hour course necessitates a very different style of teaching than a 50 minute course.
  • Students nowadays have less tolerance for an all lecture class.
  • Our students are living in a world where the get information in little bits. They are also living in a world where information comes to them on screens.
  • Breaking up your lecture with multi-media helps communicate a point and keep the students attention.
  • Giving our students a chance to interact with each other takes them to the next level of learning. Daniel: " I want to see them processing the information."
  • When all students present information, they are exposed to many opinions about a topic.

One of the most important things we can do as professors to ask a very good and thought provoking questions.

The question, as you might imagine, provoked a lively conversation where the students were all engaged in the topic. I am careful to not share my opinion on a topic, rather to seek out their opinions.

What are you experiences with these teaching styles?

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Professors - David & Daniel

 

Direct download: sc_pod_143.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:45pm PST
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SC 142 Violence on College Campuses

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 142 Violence on College Campuses

 

IN THE NEWS / USA TODAY:  Fatal Tenn. campus shooting started over dice game.

Unfortunately, campus violence is nothing new, in fact it has become the current version of “Going Postal.”

How are professors and students reacting to violence on campus?

  • Before and immediately after 911 airplanes were targets, today the targets are places of learning, our places of business.
  • These incidences, though few and far between, have become regular and are often in the back of our mind.
  • On college tours, we now hear, all the time, parents asking: “How safe is your campus?” “What do your campus police reports show?” “What do you have in place to respond to an active shooter?”
  • We are at a disadvantage due to the open nature of a college campus.

How does this affect us as professors?

  • Knowing that our classroom doors can now be locked from the inside plants the thought: “What will I do if an active shooter is on my campus?”
  • You can imagine that our students and their parents are also thinking about violence on our campuses.
  • After a shooting, faculty are thinking: “I’m looking at my students differently.”
  • When we are thinking about the possibility of violence in our classroom, we are not 100% focused on our teaching. On the other side of the lectern, our students are not 100% thinking about learning.
  • Education needs to happen in a safe place, in an environment without distraction.

How colleges are trying to cope with this.

  • Daniel: “I have made a conscious effort, not to have my teaching style change.” “I will not give into this notion of fear.”
  • A professor at Daniel’s college set up a memorial for the victims of the shooting in Oregon. This allowed the community an opportunity to express their fears, concerns, and emotions about the incident.
  • One of the things that we professors are good at is having rational conversations about difficult topics.
  • We can lead our campuses and classrooms in conversations about this topic, which moves everyone toward not “bottling up” their emotions.

After a campus shooting:

  • Our students hear the news and become more fearful.
  • Parents are now concerned more than before. “I am going to send my college kid a text to make sure they are okay.”
  • Colleges remind everyone about the procedures that they have in place for an active shooter.

How can we help our students when a shooting occurs?

  • We can educate our students about the facts and statistics of violence on college campuses. “You know, these are extremely isolated incidences.”
  • We don’t want to treat these horrible situations like: “This is what is happening everywhere all the time.”
  • We can speak and write our opinions about the violence and encourage our students to do the same.
  • We need to brainstorm and develop solutions to these problems.
  • How do we want our campuses to look in 5 years?
  • We can teach civility, conflict resolution, and mediation.

 

“My college years were the best years of my life.” – Let’s not lose that.

 

What are you experiencing as a result of violence on our campuses?

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We welcome your feedback to our work.
What are you struggling with?
How many days until a holiday break?
Have you submitted your text book requests for next semester?

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_142.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:36pm PST
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SC 141 #2. Creating Caring Moments

This podcast continues with our conversation on student caring moments.


Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 141 #2. Creating Caring Moments

1:  A group project is not going well because one student is not doing their job.

  • Our temptation is to put the responsibility on the group.
    • The students will learn as a result of peer-pressure. It's not true.
    • It is our responsibility to sit down with that student and explain that their performance is not acceptable.
    • The student needs to know that they have a responsibility to the group. This of course can be viewed as a rehearsal for a professional work environment.
    • Our tone with the student is very important. We want to encourage, teach, and set a high standard.

 

2:  How can we add some stress-relief to the student experience?

  • Build in to the class schedule:
    • "Class today in the local coffee shop!" A great opportunity to teach and connect with your students.
  • Class: "Can we have class outside today?" - Yes!
  • Build into your class schedule a surprise.
    • Plan an activity that not exceptional, then surprise them by announcing that you are replacing the activity with one that is exceptional.
  • You can remove a reading assignment from the schedule to give them a break in the middle of the semester.

 

Please join us next week. 😎

 

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We welcome your feedback to our work.
What are you struggling with?
How many days until a holiday break?

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Professors - David & Daniel

 

Direct download: sc_pod_141.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:56pm PST
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SC 140 #1. Creating Caring Moments

A student has a tragedy in their life. How can we maintain academic rigor while also showing them that we care?

Student Caring Moment

Source:  The Millennial Generation:Who Cares?  Patricia M. Carey, Assistant Provost for Scholarship Initiatives, New York University

STUDENT: Don’t my professors know how hard this work is? I’m paying their salaries and they should be helping me. Just wait until my professor sees my evaluation of him on ratemyprofessor.com, I’ll show him! That’s anger at having to put effort into earning the “A” that he/she thinks they deserve.

Our opinions:

  • This is a result of a basic misunderstanding of what our job is.
  • Students often mistake professors as tutors.
  • As professors, we teach to the whole class. This is not one on one education.
  • We can learn a lot about this generation by reading comments on ratemyprofessors.com

Small Powerful Moments of Caring

1:  A student receives a poor grade on a test and they come to speak with you about it.

  • Our words are important but not as important as our tone of voice when we speak with them.
  • We want to make it clear that what we are going to talk about is the student learning, not a grade negotiation.
  • This is a teaching opportunity to help the student learn how to do better in all of their classes.

 

2:  A student has a tragedy in their life. How can we maintain academic rigor while also showing them that we care?

  • You want to show sympathy to the student but you cannot bend the rules.
  • These conversations work best in person instead of an email.

 

Please join us next week as we continue with this conversation.

 

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We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_140.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:05am PST
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SC 139 Kidney Stones - STRESSED OUT!

Notes from Podcast #139

Kidney Stones – STRESSED OUT!

Student Caring Moment

Daniel tells a story about a student who was late to class because of kidney stones.

Managing Stress in Higher Education

What happens when a carefully planned semester goes awry because you become sick?
How can we recover from being a week behind?

  • Future classes can be adjusted while maintaining the goals for the class.
  • You can build into your class schedule several days that are extra sessions where you can provide additional information – or not.

Knowing human nature, we suspect our students rejoice when they find out that we are sick! NO CLASS – YEAH!

 

Colleagues can stress us out. NO!  (Yes)
When a colleague is stressed out and unhappy, they can cause us to feel the same way. How can we manage that?

  • Often, we can do nothing about an unhappy and stressed out colleague.
  • Abraham Lincoln remarked on this: “Most folks are as happy as they make up their minds to be.”
  • Do not be drawn into your colleagues moods and emotions.

Yes, there are people who will go out of their way to make other people unhappy which is usually as a result of their own unhappiness. Remember why you are doing what you are doing and don’t be dependent on others being happy for your happiness.

Our universities can stress us out by adding more to our already full plates.

  • Weighing the value of what you are asked to do against the value of the education you are providing to your students is a good criterion to follow.  “If I spend my time fulfilling this request, will my students benefit?” No. “No, I am not going to do that.” The student must remain the focus of our best time and energies.

We live in Orange County California where most people are stressed out by over packing our schedules. (Not to mention the freeway system.)

Building time into your schedule for things to go wrong or just non committed time can help to relieve stress.

A review of your calendar of activities over the past 3 months can reveal patterns of time management that you might not have been aware of.

 

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We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_139.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 4:15pm PST
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SC 138 Stress Management Help for Professors

Notes from Podcast #138

Stress Management Help for Professors

Student Caring Moment

David tells a story about a student who had particulary difficult and stressful learning experience.

Our opinions:

  • People may look at a student during a time when they are struggling and think, "This student is never going to make it."
  • We, as professors, in the interest of keeping a project moving forward, may make the wrong decision about a student.
  • Our students tend to never forget defining moments during their college years with us.
  • Stress can occur when we have to make a difficult decision about the education of one of our students. During defining moments, we must seek to encourage rather than discourage a student.
  • When do our students deal with stress?  ALL THE TIME!

Stress Management Help for Professors

How we control stress or how we allow it control us is the key to surviving in higher education.

What can we do relieve our stress?

  • Professor stress relief: Daniel -  "Find your own private place on campus to escape to. Stressful situations always demand that thing be fixed now, but we know they can't be."
  • Professor stress relief: It is important to be able to recognize when you are under extreme stress. 
  • Professor stress relief: David - "Find somebody to help." This positive action can offset the negative emotions that are causing you stress." Plan "B" - Take a walk.

 

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We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_138.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:55am PST
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