Student Caring - A Podcast for Professors
Join professors de Roulet and Pecoraro as they encourage professors to achieve success.
SC 137 Explaining What You Do For A Living

Explaining What You Do For A Living

Student Caring Moment

The family vacation.
Student: Professor, I just wanted to let you know that my family planned a vacation and I have to go.

Our opinions:

  • Parents may be used to pulling their kids from elementary and high school for a vacation.
  • Remember, the student did not plan this.
  • This is an opportunity for us to speak to the student about how they can talk to their parents.
  • Explain to them that a college class is like a job.
  • It is good to think about this as an educational moment rather than just a breaking of the rules.

Explaining What Do You Do For A Living

It is not uncommon for a person who isn't familiar with what a professor does to be influenced by what they have seen in the media.

Oh, you're a professor like the guy in Gilligan's Island!

Negative stories in the news can also influence society about what we do.

How can we help them to understand?

  • We can inquire about family members that they might have in college, then offer to be of assistance. Show them, by teaching them what you do for students.
  • Explain what it really means is that you have expertise in a certain area. Just as they have expertise in areas that you don't know anything about.
  • Explain that you are a full time trainer for people who want to go into certain areas.

Oh, your tenured! How interesting!
How can we explain what being tenure means?

  • Being tenured often means that you now have more work. In part, that's what it means!
  • Our committee work often consumes a large percentage of our time.
Direct download: sc_pod_137.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 1:18pm PDT
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SC 136 What Do You Do For A Living?

Notes from Podcast #136

Student Caring Moment

The bookstore ordered all the wrong books for your class and the students have already purchased them! The students, on the first day of your class are very angry. "What are you going to do about it?" "We want you to refund our money!"

Our opinions:

  • It is a great sign that the student bought the books!
  • The students assumed that the mistake was the professors. Not good.
  • It is always best to personally go the bookstore to be certain that your book orders are correct and on the shelf.
  • Be caring and proactive while addressing the problem with your students.

What Do You Do For A Living?

Refer your friends and family members to this podcast who don't understand what you do.

You are on a long flight and the person and you decide to be sociable with the person sitting next to you. Often, each party asks: "What do you do for a living?" In this podcast, we explore some tactics and tips to replace their assumptions about the world of professors with good information.

They may be thinking:

  • Isn't it your fault that the cost of higher education is out of control?
  • Ah, ha! It's his fault that so many people can't read and write!
  • The unemployment rate is high, why aren't you doing your job?

The conversations might go something like this...

YOU SAY: I’m a professor. (This is Daniel)
THEY SAY: Oh, what do you teach? (Because they want to know)
YOU SAY: I teach English.
THEY ARE THINKING: My grammar is lousy - this guy is going think I don’t know how to write.

OR THIS SCENARIO (David get’s this often)
So, what do you do?
YOU SAY: I’m a professor.
THEY SAY: Oh, what do you teach? (Because they want to know)
YOU SAY: I teach Theatre.
THEY ARE THINKING: Easy job.
THEY SAY: Oh, that sounds like fun.


YOU SAY: I’m a professor.
THEY ARE THINKING: Nice, this guy get’s 3 months off every summer.

  • David: Summer breaks for me are times when I do different work.
  • Daniel: I need to say current in my field. I update my classes, a task that I only have time for in the summer.

YOU SAY: I’m a professor.
THEY ARE THINKING: He’s the kind of guy who makes classes hard for my son.


YOU SAY: I’m a professor.
THEY ARE THINKING: It was a professor who failed me in that math class - I hate all professors!

YOU SAY: I’m a professor.
THEY SAY: What classes do you teach?
YOU ANSWER: Math 101, Data Analysis, and Statistics
THEY ARE THINKING: Only 3 classes - overpaid teacher - no wonder higher ed costs are sky high!

YOU SAY: I’m a professor.
THEY ARE THINKING: Well, isn’t that special, I’ll bet he thinks he’s smarter than me!

YOU SAY: I’m a professor.
THEY ARE THINKING: Oh, like the guy in the white coat on Gilligan’s Island.

Join us next week for part two of this topic.

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We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_136.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 5:58pm PDT
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SC 135 Grade Appeals

Grade Appeals
Managing Your Grade Book
Notes from Podcast #135

THE GRADING SERIES

Podcast # 132 / More Efficient Grading
Podcast # 133 / Good Feedback on Student Work
Podcast # 134 / Coordinating Class Assignments to Manage Your Workload
Podcast # 135 / Grade Appeals and Managing Your Grade Book

Student Caring Moment

How can we get to know our new students? 

What we do:

  • Daniel uses a survey with these questions.
    • Tell me something about yourself that will help me to distinguish you from the other students.
    • What is the most recent movie you've seen or the most recent book that you've read?
    • ...and your taking this class because?
  • Student reactions: "Wow, my professor actually wants to know something about me!"
  • David assigns a project to the class where they beak into groups to create a three-dimensional sculpture.
    • Each students contributes an object that is representative of who they are.
    • In the second class, they present their work to the class which gives not only the professor, but everyone in the class a sense of who they are as individuals.

Grade Appeals

  • Daniel is experiencing a number of grade appeals where the students wanted an "A" instead of the earned "B".
  • We must have evidence of why a specific grade was issued.
  • It is essential that we keep good track of every grade for every student.
  • Keeping good records of student attendance is something your going to need during a grade appeal.
  • Be able to explain your grading rubric / rationale.
  • Be certain that you or your spreadsheet is accurate when you calculate the grades.

 

All Podcasts

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_135.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:27am PDT
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SC 134 Coordinating Class Assignments to Manage Your Workload

Coordinating Class Assignments
Managing Your Workload
Notes from Podcast #134

THE GRADING SERIES

Podcast # 132 / More Efficient Grading
Podcast # 133 / Good Feedback on Student Work
Podcast # 134 / Coordinating Class Assignments to Manage Your Workload
Podcast # 135 / Grade Appeals and Managing Your Grade Book

Student Caring Moment

Situation: More and more we are finding that students are not buying their text books. They are shopping for the best price (better than the campus bookstore). Buying books online can take longer than is healthy for the students grade. 

Our opinions:

  • Tell your students to get the text books in a timely manner.
  • Tell your students to get the right edition.
  • Explain to your students that this is an essential step toward passing the course.
  • Would you buy an $80,000. sports car (Average cost of education today) and put in cheep fuel?

Coordinating Class Assignments

  • When you are planning out your courses, think about the entire academic term.
  • Think about the big picture and don't have multiple assignments due on the same date. A.K.A. Death by grading.
  • Factor in dates of personal importance for you. Does your spouse have a birthday during your semester? Schedule in a break for yourself too.
  • Managing the grading itself. (If you don't do this part really well, it will all fall apart.)
  • Carefully define how you will grade areas that might be vague, like participation. Eliminate any ambiguity about how you track and grade each student.
  • Your grade book is a very important tool. You might use paper or adopt a computer version. Each has advantages and disadvantages.
  • Often, students do not keep track of their grades.
  • A course management system provides professors and students online access to all grading.
  • Daniel's "personality positive" method involves going to a stationary store where he purchases a really nice notebook and his favorite pens for grading. He also enters all of the grades online.

 

All Podcasts

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

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Direct download: sc_pod_134.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 11:55am PDT
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