Student Caring - A Podcast for Professors
Join professors de Roulet and Pecoraro as they encourage professors to achieve success.
SC 129 This Noble Profession - Time Management

Time Management
The big picture

Time Management / Notes from Podcast #129

Map out the academic year before the year begins. 

  • Calendar your “Entire Academic Year.”
  • Prepare all of your class sessions before the first class of the academic term.
  • In your calendar, identify the “fixed” dates vs. the flexible dates.

PROFESSORIAL CATEGORIES OF WORK

  1. Committees
    • Meetings
    • Committee work (outside of meetings)
    • Be prepared, you may be on more than one committee.
  2. Research
    • Finding not just the time, but also the right place. Offices are not always the best place to concentrate. We like libraries and coffee shops. (The honey vanilla–latte helps too.)
    • Set aside time every week to do your research.
    • If you are collaborating with other colleagues on your research, you’ll need to coordinate multiple schedules.
  3. Writing
    • See research (Same principles apply)
  4. Grading
    • The “Five Papers A Day Rule” may serve you well.
    • Set aside specific time for grading else you may find that you not weekend.
    • NB:  We create our own grading workload when we design our courses.
  5. Course preparation
    • The time to take care of this is always, always, well in advance and before the first day of classes.
    • What we are after here is the effective course, not a few effective classes.

If you are finding these episodes helpful or you have specific questions, please don’t hesitate to email one of us. (see below)

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Next in this series:  Podcast #130. New Faculty Orientation

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_129.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:54pm PST
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SC 128 This Noble Profession - Life Outside Work

A Series for those preparing to teach in Higher Ed for the first time.

Life Outside of Work

We did not receive much good advice about how to prepare to teach when we began our careers. In this podcast series we offer advice for our future colleagues who are about to begin their teaching careers in Higher Ed.

Life Outside of Work
There needs to be one!

Your New Colleagues/ Notes from Podcast #128

It is really easy to become a workaholic in Higher Ed

You can do anything for a short period of time, right?

  • Work hard in graduate school to get a job. Then,
  • Work hard my first few years to become established at my new job. Then,
  • Work hard to get tenure (about 7 years). Then,
  • Work hard to get promoted. Then....

You really need to protect the rest of your life or you won't have one.

  • David tells a short horror-story about a professor who worked all the time.
  • Because our schedules change from semester to semester, the lines of working and not working can become blurred because we can simply fill in all of our time with work.
  • RED FLAG ATTITUDE: "You can always improve everything."
  • There is a tendency in this profession to be a little bit compulsive. We want to improve things as we teach people.

How do we establish boundaries between family and work?

  • Daniel and his wife dedicate one day a week when there will be no work. This can be tough, but it is entirely doable.
  • David and his wife take a look at the upcoming week and schedule in sections of time when we will spend time together. Last semester, they had Tuesday mornings and Thursday afternoons.
  • Scheduling in a dinner night out once a week is highly recommended.

Stay healthy.

  • You can't do well if you don't feel well.
  • Just because you have that great health insurance plan doesn't mean you have to use it!
  • Get an annual physical and when when you don't feel well, see the doctor.
  • It is good to have a physical goal. Often times, professors spend all of their time in their heads and they forget that they have bodies.
  • Daniel and his wife set a running goal on a regular basis. They even ran a marathon! (On a very hot day in Chicago.)

Make sure that your leisure activities don't become work activities. Example: If you a theatre prof. don't go see theatre on your night off.

You can spend as much time as you like on your job and likely, your college or university will not pay you more money.

Of course, if you have a family and you have children, it is whole new challenge to manage your work responsibilities with your familial responsibilities. Your kids just want to see "you." They don't care that have just begun a new job.

You don't want to hear:  "Your students are more important to you than me!"

 

All Podcasts

Next in this series:  Podcast #129. Time Management - The Big Picture

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_128.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:13am PST
Comments[0]

SC 127 This Noble Profession - Your New Boss

A Series for those preparing to teach in Higher Ed for the first time.

 

We did not receive much good advice about how to prepare to teach when we began our careers. In this podcast series we offer advice for our future colleagues who are about to begin their teaching careers in Higher Ed.

 

Your New Boss

Your New Colleagues/ Notes from Podcast #127

Who is you boss?

  • This can be very confusing in Higher Ed because we report to many people.
  • Most likely, your department chair is your boss, even though that person may be different from year to year..
 

Your department chair

  • They will give you your class assignments.
  • They will receive your teaching evaluations before you do.
  • These hard working people work vey hard!  Their job is typically, year round.
 

Understanding your department chairs

  • Discover what their expectations are for you.
  • You may not have much contact with this person.
  • TIP:  Check with this person before you take on additional responsibilities.

TIP:  Investigate the tenure process and introduce yourself to persons who are in charge of this area.

 

Next in this series:  Podcast #128. Life Outside Work

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_127.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:08pm PST
Comments[0]

SC 126  This Noble Profession - Your New Colleagues

A Series for those preparing to teach in Higher Ed for the first time.

 

We did not receive much good advice about how to prepare to teach when we began our careers. In this podcast series we offer advice for our future colleagues who are about to begin their teaching careers in Higher Ed.

Your New Colleagues

 

Your New Colleagues/ Notes from Podcast #126

Your department administrator

  • These colleagues are your new best friend.
  • They will help you with forms, paperwork, countless other items that you need to do your job.
 

Your interview committee members

  • Take time to know these people better.
  • These are the first people who accepted you first, they are your allies.
 

The people who you will be working closest with

  • Identify who these people are in your institution. Who will you be working with on a daily basis?
  • Your department chair / immediate supervisor.
  • Get to know those people who are doing the same job that you are. You are probably not the only professor teaching that subject or those courses.
  • Identify key support staff members and get to know them.
  • Get to know your campus technology people.

Next in this series:  Podcast #127. Your New Boss

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_126.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:16pm PST
Comments[0]

Course Design / Notes from Podcast #125

When you design your courses, ask yourself these questions:

  • What do I want your students to learn?
  • How am I going to communicate this to my students?
  • What assessment mechanisms will I employ?
  • How will I keep myself sane! (Beyond really–good coffee)

Best practices: (A.K.A. – things we have learned the hard way)

  • Request the syllabus and course materials from when the class was taught before.
  • Take the time to set up an organizational system for all your courses and your academic life.
  • Divide your course design into segments.
  • Help your students to know how they are doing in your class before the course drop date.
  • Stagger, across all of your course when you will have papers due and when you be in “Grading Mode.” (This is keep yourself sane tip!)
  • Be aware of college–wide calendar issues. Do you really want to plan a big test for the day after everyone returns from spring break?
  • Create a detailed class schedule for each class so your students will be able to prepare and plan ahead.
  • Request a copy of the course evaluations that your students will be filling out. Put this above your computer screen and keep it in the forefront of your mind as you design your courses.
  • Familiarize yourself – NO – learn the learning management system and know what your college requires.

 

Next in this series:  Podcast #126. Your New Colleagues

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_125.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:19am PST
Comments[0]

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