Student Caring - A Podcast for Professors
Join professors de Roulet and Pecoraro as they encourage professors to achieve success.
SC 151 New Year Resolutions for Professors

SC 151 New Year Resolutions for Professors

 

Professor New Year Resolution #1: Learn how to learn all my students names.

  • Hey, you there in the third row – go ahead!
  • We find seating charts to be really helpful.
  • Many group assignments requiring students to say their names as they present is helpful as we hear their names repeatedly.

Professor New Year Resolution #2: Don’t fall behind in my grading.

  • Daniel practices the “Grade 5 papers a day” method.
  • Relative calm and order prevail when we don’t procrastinate.

Professor New Year Resolution #3: Eat healthier and drink less coffee.

  • We are unified in our resolve to ignore the ‘less coffee’ portion of this tip.
  • Why is it so difficulty for us to eat and drink what is good for us? Stress?

Professor New Year Resolution #4: Don’t say ‘yes’ to all potential committee assignment requests.

  • This can be difficult due to our commitment to shared governance.
  • If we do to much on this side of life, our teaching can suffer.
  • Decide where you can be most effective.

Professor New Year Resolution #5: Spend less time on the Internet

  • Our is not a thinking profession at all, is it?
  • The Internet can be a huge distraction for us and rob us of precious productive time.

Professor New Year Resolution #6: Don’t check email 20 times a day!

  • Why do we do this? We don’t want to miss anything!
  • Our students check their email – constantly.
  • Students and colleagues ask: “Did you get my email?”

Professor New Year Resolution #7: Improve my professorial wardrobe.

  • Do you dress like a professor? (We are not always successful in this area.)
  • At least, for the benefit of our students, look like a professor, it really matters.

We invite you to join us in 2016 and beyond by sharing your work with the international Student Caring community.

Opportunities for you join us:

  • Write a guest blog post about…
    • Your research
    • Something you are passionate about
    • Something you want to share with students, professors, or parents.

Announcing the debut of the “One Minute Office Hour“ on January 1, 2016.

Please – share this with all college students in your world, it would really mean a lot to us as we seek to help more and more students succeed in college.

One Minute Office Hour LogoStudents who most often do not come into our offices during our office hours could benefit from a one minute (TED TALK style) video that they could access on their smart phones or computers.

  • We welcome your contributions to this video cast, publishing every Friday.
  • To participate, email david@studentcaring.com and he will get back to you with participation details.
  • Have you always had something that you wanted to share with all college students? What are you known for? Here’s your chance to tell the world.

 

If you are interested in being a guest to this podcast, just let us know!

We are continuing our research for book #2: What Professors Wish Parents Knew About College.

If you are interested in being interviewed for this book, please let us know.
David is researching this book during his sabbatical leave, spring of 2016.

 

 We wish for you all, a Happy New Year!

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_151.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:04am PST
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SC 150 The Christmas Episode
Merry Christmas & Happy Holidays from Student Caring


Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 150 The Christmas Episode

 

We celebrate podcast 150 on Christmas Day, 2015!

We invite you to join us in 2016 and beyond by sharing your work with the international Student Caring community.

Opportunities for you join us:

  • Write a guest blog post about...
    • Your research
    • Something you are passionate about
    • Something you want to share with students, professors, or parents.

Announcing the debut of the "One Minute Office Hour" on January 1, 2016.

One Minute Office Hour LogoStudents who most often do not come into our offices during our office hours could benefit from a one minute (TED TALK style) video that they could access on their smart phones or computers.

  • We welcome your contributions to this video cast, publishing every Friday.
  • To participate, email david@studentcaring.com and he will get back to you with participation details.
  • Have you always had something that you wanted to share with all college students? What are you known for? Here's your chance to tell the world.

 

If you are interested in being a guest to this podcast, just let us know!

We are continuing our research for book #2: What Professors Wish Parents Knew About College.

If you are interested in being interviewed for this book, please let us know.
David is researching this book during his sabbatical leave, spring of 2016.

 

 We wish for you all, a wonderful Christmas & Holiday break!

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Next week: Episode #150! The Christmas Episode

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_150.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:47am PST
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SC 149 The Grade Challenge

Have you heard these comments?

STUDENT: There's no way I got that grade!

STUDENT: I am not quite sure I know how I did in the course, I just want to get a better grade. 

This line of thought is usually followed by an attempt at a grade negotiation with the prof.

 

Tips for professors:

  • Keep a good grade book.
  • All along the way, remind your students to check their grades.
  • Stand firm when communicating during a grade dispute.
  • From the first assignment, our grading approach lays the foundation for the final grade.
  • Students may ask: "Is there anything I can do to improve my grade?"
    • All too often, we hear this question.
    • To accommodate this, it should be a terrific reason.
    • Every time we make a choice, it sets the standard for all current and future students.
  • Your student may not approach you directly and go over your head.
    • When this occurs, your chair or dean should refer them back to you.
    • The professor has the knowledge and control of the grading.
    • After the initial conversation, if the student still wants to pursue a grade change we refer them to the college policy. You are not under any obligation to continue to discuss the matter.
  • We are often challenged during these difficult situations with students.
  • The grade earned could be end of their college career.
  • This moment of truth could place them on academic probation.
  • We need to to the best that we possibly can to write exams that are fair and tell us what we need to know about the students progress.
  • Don't second guess your decision to the student, this can communicate that you are not certain about what you are doing.

 

 We wish for you all, a wonderful holiday break!

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Next week: Episode #150! The Christmas Episode

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_149.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:38am PST
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SC 148 The Office Party

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 148 The Office Party

 

Tips for the party planners:

  • Your attendees will be comparing your party to previous parties.
  • Employees will draw conclusions, “Oh, we must be cutting back on the expenses.” “Oh, if we can afford to spend money like this, what about my real needs a professor, what about an increase in salary?”
  • Know that every party sets an expectation level.
  • Don’t recognize employees for years of service with small meaningles trinkets. It is better to simply give a certificate.

Tips for party goers:

  • If you are participating in a gift exchange, select your gift wisely. You don’t want to embarrass anyone.
  • An office party is not a party with friends. It is a professional party.
  • Whatever you do at the office party will be remembered for years.
  • How do you dress for the office party?
    • Dress better than your usual day to day attire.
    • Perhaps a holiday tie?
    • Women will want to proceed with caution, this is not a cocktail party.
  • Don’t talk about work! That really puts a damper on a holiday party atmosphere.
  • Don’t be a pig! This is the time for you to demonstrate your best social skills.
  • All things in moderation. If you drink, be very cautious about your alcohol intake.
  • Remember, most everyone has a camera in their pocket or purse these days. You don’t want your embarrassing behavior to end up on the Internet.
  • Remember, if you bring a guest, their behavior will reflect on you. How much of your personal life do you want to share with your colleagues?
  • Relax, but be professional and dignified.

 

 We wish for you all,  wonderful office parties!

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Next week: When a student challenges your grade.

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Professors - David & Daniel

 

Direct download: sc_pod_148.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 4:42pm PST
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SC 147 Finals Week

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 147 Finals Week

 

How we can help our students during finals week.

  • We can be positive and not let our (perhaps) our true feelings about how we are feeling become known.
  • Resist the urge to pack in as much materiel as we can. Our students are not in a strong learning mode at this time of the semester.

How we can help ourselves during finals week.

  • Do we make less comments when grading finals? Yes. Grade them well, but know that students don't usually pick them up.
  • We are grading, end of the year assessments rather than providing comments for improvement.
  • David paces his finals grading to meet rather than beat the grade submission deadline.
  • Daniel advises that we get enough sleep so we can be rested for our grading tasks.
  • Consider a faculty grading party at a fun location.

 We wish for you all, a very good final week of the semester!

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Professors - David & Daniel

 

Direct download: sc_pod_147.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:50pm PST
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SC 146 How to Talk About World Events in Class

SC 146 How to Talk About World Events in Class

Responding to terror in France

How we can help our students process significant world events.

  • Give your students a question to write about in class and follow it up with a moderated group discussion.
  • Ask your students to take a position and write about it. The purpose of the assignment is not to improve their writing, but to get them to talk about it.
  • Discussion rules are established:
    • Only one student may speak at a time.
    • No one is allowed to interrupt anyone else.
    • You have to be called upon to speak.
    • No one is allowed to react to anyone else opinion.
  • We are teaching them how to have academic conversations.
  • We want to create a safe place in our classrooms where students can speak their minds. Where else in our society today can we safely do that?
  • Our students tend to be socially connected with each other, but not as much with global issues.

Our hearts go out the people of France.

 We want to encourage our students not to give into the fear.
We have life experiences to offer students.

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Professors - David & Daniel

 

Direct download: sc_pod_146.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:28am PST
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SC 145 STOP!  STOP!   STOP!

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 145 STOP! STOP! STOP!

 

Take a Christmas or holiday break.

Avoiding professorial burnout.

  • Daniel went on strike last weekend! He took a weekend off which resulted in a good Monday morning.
  • NOTE: This is not for you if you don’t have any problems stopping for the break.
  • Are you looking forward to the holiday break so you can get ready for next semester?
  • You (Yes YOU!) need to take a break from being a professor.

How can we achieve this?

  • Distance yourself from the elements of your work. Perhaps that is a laptop computer?
  • Any activity other than working as a professor will give you a rest.
  • Eliminate that worry about the first day of classes by preparing between now and the end of finals week.
  • Think about what you will want to accomplish, non work-wise, over your holiday break. Plan some activities that don’t involve using your head.
  • A change in environment can help you to disconnect from work.
  • Do not go to your campus!
  • Go to a place where there is no Internet.
  • TIP:  You might not want to tell your colleagues, during finals week: “I am 100% ready for the first day of classes!”

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Professors - David & Daniel

Direct download: sc_pod_145.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 2:35pm PST
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SC 144 Student Centered Teaching

SC 144 Student Centered Teaching

As we record this the Santa Ana winds are blowing in Southern California.
Daniel recommends the writings of Joan Didian The Santa Anas.

STUDENT CARING MOMENT

Helping students with their stress:

  • Students are usually trying to solve many problems at once. Talk them through their situations one-by-one. When the situations are broken down into individual moments, it can help them to manage their stress.
  • Worrying is helpful in small doses but honestly, would it help?

Teaching Styles

Student centered teaching

  • This doesn’t have to be all or nothing, we can blend our teaching styles to provide variety in the classroom.
  • Often, Daniel will teach two-thirds of class in lecture mode, then switch to a student guided activity for the remainder of the class.
  • We can orchestrate a reversal of roles where the student is now the teacher. As we well know, you have to know a topic really well before you attempt to teach it to others.
  • We can place students in charge by assigning them a topic to present that will enhance the learning experience for all students. Now, “The Sage on the Stage” is the student and not the professor.
  • This approach brings the students work into the spotlight as they show us how much they are learning. These presentations, when done well, result in the student feeling very proud of their work.
  • This method of teaching will tell you more about what they learning than a final exam.
  • When your students are presenting, lack of engagement is not an option.

 

We move from being the “Sage on the Stage” to the “Guide on the Side.”

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Professors - David & Daniel

 

Direct download: sc_pod_144.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:29pm PST
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SC 143 Teaching Styles: Teacher or Student Centered?

NEWS / Watch for our podcast on the new Google Play network. Coming soon!

STUDENT CARING MOMENT

Stay in touch with your former students. We find that Facebook can help us to be available to our students who want to share their life experiences with us.

Our former student can provide a perspective of what life is like after college to current students.

Teaching Styles

Teacher centered approach

  • Often thought of as "Old School"
  • The professor lectures, the students listen and take notes.
  • The teach is the formal authority and expert.

Student centered approach

  • Inquiry based learning
  • The teacher is working more as a coach or facilitator.
  • The teacher is seen as the more experienced learner among peers.

We use a combination of these two styles.

  • We remember "The Sage on the Stage" and overhead projectors!
  • Our professors were usually the ones who wrote the textbook we were learning from.
  • There is high value to a person who is an expert and who writes text books.
  • Lecturing for 18 weeks can be sure fire way to put your students to sleep.
  • At some point, the professor needs to be the expert in the classroom.
  • A variety in teaching styles can be achieved with a variety courses with a four-year program.

Length of class time dictates that we vary our teaching styles.

  • A five hour course necessitates a very different style of teaching than a 50 minute course.
  • Students nowadays have less tolerance for an all lecture class.
  • Our students are living in a world where the get information in little bits. They are also living in a world where information comes to them on screens.
  • Breaking up your lecture with multi-media helps communicate a point and keep the students attention.
  • Giving our students a chance to interact with each other takes them to the next level of learning. Daniel: " I want to see them processing the information."
  • When all students present information, they are exposed to many opinions about a topic.

One of the most important things we can do as professors to ask a very good and thought provoking questions.

The question, as you might imagine, provoked a lively conversation where the students were all engaged in the topic. I am careful to not share my opinion on a topic, rather to seek out their opinions.

What are you experiences with these teaching styles?

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Professors - David & Daniel

 

Direct download: sc_pod_143.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:45pm PST
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SC 142 Violence on College Campuses

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 142 Violence on College Campuses

 

IN THE NEWS / USA TODAY:  Fatal Tenn. campus shooting started over dice game.

Unfortunately, campus violence is nothing new, in fact it has become the current version of “Going Postal.”

How are professors and students reacting to violence on campus?

  • Before and immediately after 911 airplanes were targets, today the targets are places of learning, our places of business.
  • These incidences, though few and far between, have become regular and are often in the back of our mind.
  • On college tours, we now hear, all the time, parents asking: “How safe is your campus?” “What do your campus police reports show?” “What do you have in place to respond to an active shooter?”
  • We are at a disadvantage due to the open nature of a college campus.

How does this affect us as professors?

  • Knowing that our classroom doors can now be locked from the inside plants the thought: “What will I do if an active shooter is on my campus?”
  • You can imagine that our students and their parents are also thinking about violence on our campuses.
  • After a shooting, faculty are thinking: “I’m looking at my students differently.”
  • When we are thinking about the possibility of violence in our classroom, we are not 100% focused on our teaching. On the other side of the lectern, our students are not 100% thinking about learning.
  • Education needs to happen in a safe place, in an environment without distraction.

How colleges are trying to cope with this.

  • Daniel: “I have made a conscious effort, not to have my teaching style change.” “I will not give into this notion of fear.”
  • A professor at Daniel’s college set up a memorial for the victims of the shooting in Oregon. This allowed the community an opportunity to express their fears, concerns, and emotions about the incident.
  • One of the things that we professors are good at is having rational conversations about difficult topics.
  • We can lead our campuses and classrooms in conversations about this topic, which moves everyone toward not “bottling up” their emotions.

After a campus shooting:

  • Our students hear the news and become more fearful.
  • Parents are now concerned more than before. “I am going to send my college kid a text to make sure they are okay.”
  • Colleges remind everyone about the procedures that they have in place for an active shooter.

How can we help our students when a shooting occurs?

  • We can educate our students about the facts and statistics of violence on college campuses. “You know, these are extremely isolated incidences.”
  • We don’t want to treat these horrible situations like: “This is what is happening everywhere all the time.”
  • We can speak and write our opinions about the violence and encourage our students to do the same.
  • We need to brainstorm and develop solutions to these problems.
  • How do we want our campuses to look in 5 years?
  • We can teach civility, conflict resolution, and mediation.

 

“My college years were the best years of my life.” – Let’s not lose that.

 

What are you experiencing as a result of violence on our campuses?

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We welcome your feedback to our work.
What are you struggling with?
How many days until a holiday break?
Have you submitted your text book requests for next semester?

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_142.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:36pm PST
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SC 141 #2. Creating Caring Moments

This podcast continues with our conversation on student caring moments.


Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 141 #2. Creating Caring Moments

1:  A group project is not going well because one student is not doing their job.

  • Our temptation is to put the responsibility on the group.
    • The students will learn as a result of peer-pressure. It's not true.
    • It is our responsibility to sit down with that student and explain that their performance is not acceptable.
    • The student needs to know that they have a responsibility to the group. This of course can be viewed as a rehearsal for a professional work environment.
    • Our tone with the student is very important. We want to encourage, teach, and set a high standard.

 

2:  How can we add some stress-relief to the student experience?

  • Build in to the class schedule:
    • "Class today in the local coffee shop!" A great opportunity to teach and connect with your students.
  • Class: "Can we have class outside today?" - Yes!
  • Build into your class schedule a surprise.
    • Plan an activity that not exceptional, then surprise them by announcing that you are replacing the activity with one that is exceptional.
  • You can remove a reading assignment from the schedule to give them a break in the middle of the semester.

 

Please join us next week. 😎

 

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We welcome your feedback to our work.
What are you struggling with?
How many days until a holiday break?

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Professors - David & Daniel

 

Direct download: sc_pod_141.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:56pm PST
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SC 140 #1. Creating Caring Moments

A student has a tragedy in their life. How can we maintain academic rigor while also showing them that we care?

Student Caring Moment

Source:  The Millennial Generation:Who Cares?  Patricia M. Carey, Assistant Provost for Scholarship Initiatives, New York University

STUDENT: Don’t my professors know how hard this work is? I’m paying their salaries and they should be helping me. Just wait until my professor sees my evaluation of him on ratemyprofessor.com, I’ll show him! That’s anger at having to put effort into earning the “A” that he/she thinks they deserve.

Our opinions:

  • This is a result of a basic misunderstanding of what our job is.
  • Students often mistake professors as tutors.
  • As professors, we teach to the whole class. This is not one on one education.
  • We can learn a lot about this generation by reading comments on ratemyprofessors.com

Small Powerful Moments of Caring

1:  A student receives a poor grade on a test and they come to speak with you about it.

  • Our words are important but not as important as our tone of voice when we speak with them.
  • We want to make it clear that what we are going to talk about is the student learning, not a grade negotiation.
  • This is a teaching opportunity to help the student learn how to do better in all of their classes.

 

2:  A student has a tragedy in their life. How can we maintain academic rigor while also showing them that we care?

  • You want to show sympathy to the student but you cannot bend the rules.
  • These conversations work best in person instead of an email.

 

Please join us next week as we continue with this conversation.

 

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We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_140.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:05am PST
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SC 139 Kidney Stones - STRESSED OUT!

Notes from Podcast #139

Kidney Stones – STRESSED OUT!

Student Caring Moment

Daniel tells a story about a student who was late to class because of kidney stones.

Managing Stress in Higher Education

What happens when a carefully planned semester goes awry because you become sick?
How can we recover from being a week behind?

  • Future classes can be adjusted while maintaining the goals for the class.
  • You can build into your class schedule several days that are extra sessions where you can provide additional information – or not.

Knowing human nature, we suspect our students rejoice when they find out that we are sick! NO CLASS – YEAH!

 

Colleagues can stress us out. NO!  (Yes)
When a colleague is stressed out and unhappy, they can cause us to feel the same way. How can we manage that?

  • Often, we can do nothing about an unhappy and stressed out colleague.
  • Abraham Lincoln remarked on this: “Most folks are as happy as they make up their minds to be.”
  • Do not be drawn into your colleagues moods and emotions.

Yes, there are people who will go out of their way to make other people unhappy which is usually as a result of their own unhappiness. Remember why you are doing what you are doing and don’t be dependent on others being happy for your happiness.

Our universities can stress us out by adding more to our already full plates.

  • Weighing the value of what you are asked to do against the value of the education you are providing to your students is a good criterion to follow.  “If I spend my time fulfilling this request, will my students benefit?” No. “No, I am not going to do that.” The student must remain the focus of our best time and energies.

We live in Orange County California where most people are stressed out by over packing our schedules. (Not to mention the freeway system.)

Building time into your schedule for things to go wrong or just non committed time can help to relieve stress.

A review of your calendar of activities over the past 3 months can reveal patterns of time management that you might not have been aware of.

 

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We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_139.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 4:15pm PST
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SC 138 Stress Management Help for Professors

Notes from Podcast #138

Stress Management Help for Professors

Student Caring Moment

David tells a story about a student who had particulary difficult and stressful learning experience.

Our opinions:

  • People may look at a student during a time when they are struggling and think, "This student is never going to make it."
  • We, as professors, in the interest of keeping a project moving forward, may make the wrong decision about a student.
  • Our students tend to never forget defining moments during their college years with us.
  • Stress can occur when we have to make a difficult decision about the education of one of our students. During defining moments, we must seek to encourage rather than discourage a student.
  • When do our students deal with stress?  ALL THE TIME!

Stress Management Help for Professors

How we control stress or how we allow it control us is the key to surviving in higher education.

What can we do relieve our stress?

  • Professor stress relief: Daniel -  "Find your own private place on campus to escape to. Stressful situations always demand that thing be fixed now, but we know they can't be."
  • Professor stress relief: It is important to be able to recognize when you are under extreme stress. 
  • Professor stress relief: David - "Find somebody to help." This positive action can offset the negative emotions that are causing you stress." Plan "B" - Take a walk.

 

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We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_138.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:55am PST
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SC 137 Explaining What You Do For A Living

Explaining What You Do For A Living

Student Caring Moment

The family vacation.
Student: Professor, I just wanted to let you know that my family planned a vacation and I have to go.

Our opinions:

  • Parents may be used to pulling their kids from elementary and high school for a vacation.
  • Remember, the student did not plan this.
  • This is an opportunity for us to speak to the student about how they can talk to their parents.
  • Explain to them that a college class is like a job.
  • It is good to think about this as an educational moment rather than just a breaking of the rules.

Explaining What Do You Do For A Living

It is not uncommon for a person who isn't familiar with what a professor does to be influenced by what they have seen in the media.

Oh, you're a professor like the guy in Gilligan's Island!

Negative stories in the news can also influence society about what we do.

How can we help them to understand?

  • We can inquire about family members that they might have in college, then offer to be of assistance. Show them, by teaching them what you do for students.
  • Explain what it really means is that you have expertise in a certain area. Just as they have expertise in areas that you don't know anything about.
  • Explain that you are a full time trainer for people who want to go into certain areas.

Oh, your tenured! How interesting!
How can we explain what being tenure means?

  • Being tenured often means that you now have more work. In part, that's what it means!
  • Our committee work often consumes a large percentage of our time.
Direct download: sc_pod_137.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 1:18pm PST
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SC 136 What Do You Do For A Living?

Notes from Podcast #136

Student Caring Moment

The bookstore ordered all the wrong books for your class and the students have already purchased them! The students, on the first day of your class are very angry. "What are you going to do about it?" "We want you to refund our money!"

Our opinions:

  • It is a great sign that the student bought the books!
  • The students assumed that the mistake was the professors. Not good.
  • It is always best to personally go the bookstore to be certain that your book orders are correct and on the shelf.
  • Be caring and proactive while addressing the problem with your students.

What Do You Do For A Living?

Refer your friends and family members to this podcast who don't understand what you do.

You are on a long flight and the person and you decide to be sociable with the person sitting next to you. Often, each party asks: "What do you do for a living?" In this podcast, we explore some tactics and tips to replace their assumptions about the world of professors with good information.

They may be thinking:

  • Isn't it your fault that the cost of higher education is out of control?
  • Ah, ha! It's his fault that so many people can't read and write!
  • The unemployment rate is high, why aren't you doing your job?

The conversations might go something like this...

YOU SAY: I’m a professor. (This is Daniel)
THEY SAY: Oh, what do you teach? (Because they want to know)
YOU SAY: I teach English.
THEY ARE THINKING: My grammar is lousy - this guy is going think I don’t know how to write.

OR THIS SCENARIO (David get’s this often)
So, what do you do?
YOU SAY: I’m a professor.
THEY SAY: Oh, what do you teach? (Because they want to know)
YOU SAY: I teach Theatre.
THEY ARE THINKING: Easy job.
THEY SAY: Oh, that sounds like fun.


YOU SAY: I’m a professor.
THEY ARE THINKING: Nice, this guy get’s 3 months off every summer.

  • David: Summer breaks for me are times when I do different work.
  • Daniel: I need to say current in my field. I update my classes, a task that I only have time for in the summer.

YOU SAY: I’m a professor.
THEY ARE THINKING: He’s the kind of guy who makes classes hard for my son.


YOU SAY: I’m a professor.
THEY ARE THINKING: It was a professor who failed me in that math class - I hate all professors!

YOU SAY: I’m a professor.
THEY SAY: What classes do you teach?
YOU ANSWER: Math 101, Data Analysis, and Statistics
THEY ARE THINKING: Only 3 classes - overpaid teacher - no wonder higher ed costs are sky high!

YOU SAY: I’m a professor.
THEY ARE THINKING: Well, isn’t that special, I’ll bet he thinks he’s smarter than me!

YOU SAY: I’m a professor.
THEY ARE THINKING: Oh, like the guy in the white coat on Gilligan’s Island.

Join us next week for part two of this topic.

All Podcasts

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_136.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 5:58pm PST
Comments[0]

SC 135 Grade Appeals

Grade Appeals
Managing Your Grade Book
Notes from Podcast #135

THE GRADING SERIES

Podcast # 132 / More Efficient Grading
Podcast # 133 / Good Feedback on Student Work
Podcast # 134 / Coordinating Class Assignments to Manage Your Workload
Podcast # 135 / Grade Appeals and Managing Your Grade Book

Student Caring Moment

How can we get to know our new students? 

What we do:

  • Daniel uses a survey with these questions.
    • Tell me something about yourself that will help me to distinguish you from the other students.
    • What is the most recent movie you've seen or the most recent book that you've read?
    • ...and your taking this class because?
  • Student reactions: "Wow, my professor actually wants to know something about me!"
  • David assigns a project to the class where they beak into groups to create a three-dimensional sculpture.
    • Each students contributes an object that is representative of who they are.
    • In the second class, they present their work to the class which gives not only the professor, but everyone in the class a sense of who they are as individuals.

Grade Appeals

  • Daniel is experiencing a number of grade appeals where the students wanted an "A" instead of the earned "B".
  • We must have evidence of why a specific grade was issued.
  • It is essential that we keep good track of every grade for every student.
  • Keeping good records of student attendance is something your going to need during a grade appeal.
  • Be able to explain your grading rubric / rationale.
  • Be certain that you or your spreadsheet is accurate when you calculate the grades.

 

All Podcasts

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_135.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:27am PST
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SC 134 Coordinating Class Assignments to Manage Your Workload

Coordinating Class Assignments
Managing Your Workload
Notes from Podcast #134

THE GRADING SERIES

Podcast # 132 / More Efficient Grading
Podcast # 133 / Good Feedback on Student Work
Podcast # 134 / Coordinating Class Assignments to Manage Your Workload
Podcast # 135 / Grade Appeals and Managing Your Grade Book

Student Caring Moment

Situation: More and more we are finding that students are not buying their text books. They are shopping for the best price (better than the campus bookstore). Buying books online can take longer than is healthy for the students grade. 

Our opinions:

  • Tell your students to get the text books in a timely manner.
  • Tell your students to get the right edition.
  • Explain to your students that this is an essential step toward passing the course.
  • Would you buy an $80,000. sports car (Average cost of education today) and put in cheep fuel?

Coordinating Class Assignments

  • When you are planning out your courses, think about the entire academic term.
  • Think about the big picture and don't have multiple assignments due on the same date. A.K.A. Death by grading.
  • Factor in dates of personal importance for you. Does your spouse have a birthday during your semester? Schedule in a break for yourself too.
  • Managing the grading itself. (If you don't do this part really well, it will all fall apart.)
  • Carefully define how you will grade areas that might be vague, like participation. Eliminate any ambiguity about how you track and grade each student.
  • Your grade book is a very important tool. You might use paper or adopt a computer version. Each has advantages and disadvantages.
  • Often, students do not keep track of their grades.
  • A course management system provides professors and students online access to all grading.
  • Daniel's "personality positive" method involves going to a stationary store where he purchases a really nice notebook and his favorite pens for grading. He also enters all of the grades online.

 

All Podcasts

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

###

Direct download: sc_pod_134.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 11:55am PST
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SC 133 Feedback on Student Work

Good Feedback on Student Work
Notes from Podcast #133

THE GRADING SERIES

Podcast # 132 / More Efficient Grading
Podcast # 133 / Good Feedback on Student Work
Podcast # 134 / Coordinating Class Assignments to Manage Your Workload
Podcast # 135 / Grade Appeals and Managing Your Grade Book

Student Caring Moment

Situation: A students comes into your office, during office hours. They explain that they are not doing well in your course and also reveal that they are having personal difficulties and explain what they are.

Our opinions:

  • Ask yourself: "What are my responsibilities to my college?"
  • Talk to your department chair or dean to discover what your responsibilities are.
  • This is really 2 separate situations. First, their academic standing in your class and second, to make them aware of professional services available for them.
  • Academic standing: Explain to them where they are at in your course and their options for improving their grade, or not.

Feedback on student work.

  • Creating a feedback loop between you and each student can be very advantageous.
  • David creates regular assignments called WorkNotes where the student is given an opportunity to ask questions in addition to answering questions about the reading  / topic for that class.
  • A feedback loop, in writing, gives the shy student an regular opportunity to ask their question.
  • This is opposite of the autopsy method of grading. Why the student failed.
  • Over time, this reveals information for us modify and revise our courses.

 

All Podcasts

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_133.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 4:41pm PST
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SC 132 More Efficient Grading

More Efficient Grading
Notes from Podcast #132

THE GRADING SERIES

Podcast # 133 / Good Feedback on Student Work
Podcast # 134 / Coordinating Class Assignments to Manage Your Workload
Podcast # 135 / Grade Appeals and Managing Your Grade Book

Student Caring Moment

Situation: A student, who was doing well along the way, toward the end of the term is failing your class. The next semester they are on the edge of academic probation. After a confidential meeting, you learn that they are experiencing significant difficulties in their personal life that are causing their grades to drop. You are charged with the task of helping them.

Our opinions:

  • Connect with them on a human level. Take the time to really listen to your student before offering advice about their next steps.
  • Investigate the possibility of a medical withdrawal if your university offers one.
  • Consider giving them an incomplete grade, but weigh that with your workload.

Tips for more efficient grading.

  • One of Daniel’s colleagues discovered a feature in the popular  Turn It In dot Comtii-logo service that reveals if your student has read your grading comments or not.
  • Only one-third of the students were looking at the comments.
  • Self talk: Is there anything we are doing that’s encouraging this behavior?
  • When students see a large amount of comments they are overwhelmed and don’t know how to process it. This is not helpful to the student.
  • It may be more efficient for you to give the student 2 or 3 things that you would like them to concentrate on.
  • This is a teaching strategy that moves away from direction and correction toward evaluation, coaching, and encouraging.

 

All Podcasts

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_132.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:10am PST
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SC 131 This Noble Profession - Before You Walk into the Classroom

Before You Walk Into the Classroom
For the First Time

This Noble Profession / Before You Walk Into the Classroom/ Notes from Podcast #131

Tips for your first day of teaching.

  • You need to have a game plan for your first day. The first day is really important.
  • Run through your class the night before so can get a sense of how it actually takes. Over preparing is a good approach, that way you'll always have enough materiel.
  • As you are teaching, be aware of time. David likes to have a clock in the back of the room.
  • Rest assured:
    • The students are nervous too!
    • You know more than any of the students in the class.
  • Talk to somebody else who has been teaching there awhile and ask:
    • "What are the kinds of things I can expect on the first day of class?"
  • On the first day, you are setting a "tone." Think about what "tone" you want to set. Are you seeking a relaxed learning environment, a rigourous course, a community?
  • YOU DON'T WANT TO READ THE SYLLABUS TO THEM ON THE FIRST DAY. Apologies for the CAPS, we feel strongly about this. The students will think, "What, I can't read?!"
  • Think about:
    • What do I want to present about myself?
    • What do I want to present about my subject?
  • The first day you walk into the classroom should not be the first day you walk into the classroom.
    • Get in there ahead of time and understand how the technology works.
    • Become comfortable with the environment of your classroom.
  • Arrive early on the first day. The students are expecting you to be the host as you welcome them into your academic home.
  • Find your self-confident mode.

We wish you all the best as you begin your teaching careers!

Colleagues - WELCOME!

All Podcasts

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_131.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:16pm PST
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SC 130 This Noble Profession - New Faculty Orientation

 

Faculty Orientation

New Faculty Orientation
Day One

New Faculty Orientation/ Notes from Podcast #130

Here's what we expect you will experience as part of your orientation. (By the way, all of this is overwhelming.)

  • Office set up
  • Human resources forms
  • Policies and procedures
  • University expectations
  • You will meet many new people, some of them will be important to you and some not.

Faculty Orientation Tips

  • How do you decide what's important?
    • If it is on a handout, its important, keep it!
    • Take thorough notes, especially about who does what.
  • Don't be overly concerned about the common human resources education that you will encounter. You can expect some of these:
    • Multi cultural awareness
    • (Anti) Sexual harassment training
  • Know that you will need to sign something that says you know this information.
  • When Daniel went through this at his college, he was fingerprinted.
  • This is an excellent opportunity to meet new people, especially all of the people who are starting at the same time you are.
  • In these large meetings, you can meet people from other areas of the campus which will give you a sense of the bigger picture.

Daniel tells a particularly interesting Chicago story. (You'll have to listen to the podcast to get the full benefit of this one.)

 

All Podcasts

Next in this series:  Podcast #131. Before you walk into the classroom for the first time...

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_130.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:59am PST
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SC 129 This Noble Profession - Time Management

Time Management
The big picture

Time Management / Notes from Podcast #129

Map out the academic year before the year begins. 

  • Calendar your “Entire Academic Year.”
  • Prepare all of your class sessions before the first class of the academic term.
  • In your calendar, identify the “fixed” dates vs. the flexible dates.

PROFESSORIAL CATEGORIES OF WORK

  1. Committees
    • Meetings
    • Committee work (outside of meetings)
    • Be prepared, you may be on more than one committee.
  2. Research
    • Finding not just the time, but also the right place. Offices are not always the best place to concentrate. We like libraries and coffee shops. (The honey vanilla–latte helps too.)
    • Set aside time every week to do your research.
    • If you are collaborating with other colleagues on your research, you’ll need to coordinate multiple schedules.
  3. Writing
    • See research (Same principles apply)
  4. Grading
    • The “Five Papers A Day Rule” may serve you well.
    • Set aside specific time for grading else you may find that you not weekend.
    • NB:  We create our own grading workload when we design our courses.
  5. Course preparation
    • The time to take care of this is always, always, well in advance and before the first day of classes.
    • What we are after here is the effective course, not a few effective classes.

If you are finding these episodes helpful or you have specific questions, please don’t hesitate to email one of us. (see below)

All Podcasts

Next in this series:  Podcast #130. New Faculty Orientation

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_129.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:54pm PST
Comments[0]

SC 128 This Noble Profession - Life Outside Work

A Series for those preparing to teach in Higher Ed for the first time.

Life Outside of Work

We did not receive much good advice about how to prepare to teach when we began our careers. In this podcast series we offer advice for our future colleagues who are about to begin their teaching careers in Higher Ed.

Life Outside of Work
There needs to be one!

Your New Colleagues/ Notes from Podcast #128

It is really easy to become a workaholic in Higher Ed

You can do anything for a short period of time, right?

  • Work hard in graduate school to get a job. Then,
  • Work hard my first few years to become established at my new job. Then,
  • Work hard to get tenure (about 7 years). Then,
  • Work hard to get promoted. Then....

You really need to protect the rest of your life or you won't have one.

  • David tells a short horror-story about a professor who worked all the time.
  • Because our schedules change from semester to semester, the lines of working and not working can become blurred because we can simply fill in all of our time with work.
  • RED FLAG ATTITUDE: "You can always improve everything."
  • There is a tendency in this profession to be a little bit compulsive. We want to improve things as we teach people.

How do we establish boundaries between family and work?

  • Daniel and his wife dedicate one day a week when there will be no work. This can be tough, but it is entirely doable.
  • David and his wife take a look at the upcoming week and schedule in sections of time when we will spend time together. Last semester, they had Tuesday mornings and Thursday afternoons.
  • Scheduling in a dinner night out once a week is highly recommended.

Stay healthy.

  • You can't do well if you don't feel well.
  • Just because you have that great health insurance plan doesn't mean you have to use it!
  • Get an annual physical and when when you don't feel well, see the doctor.
  • It is good to have a physical goal. Often times, professors spend all of their time in their heads and they forget that they have bodies.
  • Daniel and his wife set a running goal on a regular basis. They even ran a marathon! (On a very hot day in Chicago.)

Make sure that your leisure activities don't become work activities. Example: If you a theatre prof. don't go see theatre on your night off.

You can spend as much time as you like on your job and likely, your college or university will not pay you more money.

Of course, if you have a family and you have children, it is whole new challenge to manage your work responsibilities with your familial responsibilities. Your kids just want to see "you." They don't care that have just begun a new job.

You don't want to hear:  "Your students are more important to you than me!"

 

All Podcasts

Next in this series:  Podcast #129. Time Management - The Big Picture

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_128.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:13am PST
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SC 127 This Noble Profession - Your New Boss

A Series for those preparing to teach in Higher Ed for the first time.

 

We did not receive much good advice about how to prepare to teach when we began our careers. In this podcast series we offer advice for our future colleagues who are about to begin their teaching careers in Higher Ed.

 

Your New Boss

Your New Colleagues/ Notes from Podcast #127

Who is you boss?

  • This can be very confusing in Higher Ed because we report to many people.
  • Most likely, your department chair is your boss, even though that person may be different from year to year..
 

Your department chair

  • They will give you your class assignments.
  • They will receive your teaching evaluations before you do.
  • These hard working people work vey hard!  Their job is typically, year round.
 

Understanding your department chairs

  • Discover what their expectations are for you.
  • You may not have much contact with this person.
  • TIP:  Check with this person before you take on additional responsibilities.

TIP:  Investigate the tenure process and introduce yourself to persons who are in charge of this area.

 

Next in this series:  Podcast #128. Life Outside Work

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_127.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:08pm PST
Comments[0]

SC 126  This Noble Profession - Your New Colleagues

A Series for those preparing to teach in Higher Ed for the first time.

 

We did not receive much good advice about how to prepare to teach when we began our careers. In this podcast series we offer advice for our future colleagues who are about to begin their teaching careers in Higher Ed.

Your New Colleagues

 

Your New Colleagues/ Notes from Podcast #126

Your department administrator

  • These colleagues are your new best friend.
  • They will help you with forms, paperwork, countless other items that you need to do your job.
 

Your interview committee members

  • Take time to know these people better.
  • These are the first people who accepted you first, they are your allies.
 

The people who you will be working closest with

  • Identify who these people are in your institution. Who will you be working with on a daily basis?
  • Your department chair / immediate supervisor.
  • Get to know those people who are doing the same job that you are. You are probably not the only professor teaching that subject or those courses.
  • Identify key support staff members and get to know them.
  • Get to know your campus technology people.

Next in this series:  Podcast #127. Your New Boss

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_126.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:16pm PST
Comments[0]

Course Design / Notes from Podcast #125

When you design your courses, ask yourself these questions:

  • What do I want your students to learn?
  • How am I going to communicate this to my students?
  • What assessment mechanisms will I employ?
  • How will I keep myself sane! (Beyond really–good coffee)

Best practices: (A.K.A. – things we have learned the hard way)

  • Request the syllabus and course materials from when the class was taught before.
  • Take the time to set up an organizational system for all your courses and your academic life.
  • Divide your course design into segments.
  • Help your students to know how they are doing in your class before the course drop date.
  • Stagger, across all of your course when you will have papers due and when you be in “Grading Mode.” (This is keep yourself sane tip!)
  • Be aware of college–wide calendar issues. Do you really want to plan a big test for the day after everyone returns from spring break?
  • Create a detailed class schedule for each class so your students will be able to prepare and plan ahead.
  • Request a copy of the course evaluations that your students will be filling out. Put this above your computer screen and keep it in the forefront of your mind as you design your courses.
  • Familiarize yourself – NO – learn the learning management system and know what your college requires.

 

Next in this series:  Podcast #126. Your New Colleagues

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_125.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:19am PST
Comments[0]

SC 124  This Noble Profession - Your Students

A Series for those preparing to teach in Higher Ed for the first time.

Who Will You Be Teaching?

We did not receive much good advice about how to prepare to teach when we began our careers. In this podcast series we offer advice for our future colleagues who are about to begin their teaching careers in Higher Ed.

Learning About Who You Will be Teaching / Notes from Podcast #124

Learning About Who Your Students Are

  • Request an academic report from your admissions or I.T. department.
  • Ask your students to write a “Who we are” paper.
  • During the first days of instruction conduct informal “Getting to know each other” conversations with your new students.

Research

  • Perform an Internet search of what has occurred in the lifetime of your students. Making a reference to something that occurred 25 years ago may not be relatable for them.

Perspective & Tone

  • Most of your students are just three months out of high school.
  • Set the tone in the first few days of classes. Let your student know what your expectations are for them. This will put them at ease by eliminating some of their unknowns and fears.
  • Remember that YOU only have one chance to make a first impression on your students, this is important.

Next in this series:  Podcast #125. Course Design

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_124.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:38pm PST
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SC 123  This Noble Profession - Environment

We did not receive much good advice about how to prepare to teach when we began our careers. In this podcast series we offer advice for our future colleagues who are about to begin their teaching careers in Higher Ed.

Your New Environment / Notes from Podcast #123

Living Considerations

  • Where you live in relationship to where you work is important.
  • Commuting two to four hours a day can take a lot out of you.
  • Consider the negative aspects of being too close to campus. The lack of physical distance can lead to a "fishbowl" experience.
  • As a new prof. you need to be physically on campus and visible as much as possible.

The College Environment

  • Working on a campus is really nice!
  • Most folks who go to work every day do not experience they joy of working in a place of learning.
  • Don't become a cubicle worker. Get out and interact with others around campus.
  • We encourage you introduce yourself to people in other departments.
  • Go to sporting and arts events. Universities have a great deal to offer.

Setting Up Your Office

  • "A place for everything and everything in its place."
  • Create a welcoming and interesting place for your students when they come to visit.
  • Organizing your office will reduce your stress level.


Next in this series:  Podcast #124. Learning about who you will be teaching.

 

We welcome your feedback to our work.

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_123.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 6:08am PST
Comments[0]

SC 122  This Noble Profession

NEW Podcast Series!
This Noble Profession

Information for those preparing to teach in Higher Ed for the first time.

THE SERIES

123.Your new environment

124.Learning about who you will be teaching

125.Course design

126.Your new colleagues

127.Your new boss

128.Life outside of work

129.Time Management – The Big Picture

130.New faculty orientation

131.Before you walk into the classroom for the first time

Direct download: sc_pod_122.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 6:07am PST
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SC 122  This Noble Profession

NEW Podcast Series!
This Noble Profession

Information for those preparing to teach in Higher Ed for the first time.

THE SERIES

123.Your new environment

124.Learning about who you will be teaching

125.Course design

126.Your new colleagues

127.Your new boss

128.Life outside of work

129.Time Management – The Big Picture

130.New faculty orientation

131.Before you walk into the classroom for the first time

Direct download: sc_pod_122.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:00am PST
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SC 121  College Prepares us for 100 Years Ago.
Direct download: sc_pod_121.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:22am PST
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SC 120  A Revealing Student Survey
Direct download: sc_pod_120.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:37pm PST
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SC 119  Student situation: What would you do?
Direct download: sc_pod_119.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 12:23pm PST
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SC 118  Senioritis
Direct download: sc_pod_118.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:59am PST
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SC 117  Recognizing Professorial Stress
Direct download: sc_pod_117.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 11:52am PST
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SC 116  Student Stress
Direct download: sc_pod_116.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 2:26pm PST
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SC 115  College Life and the Rest of Our Life
Direct download: sc_pod_115.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:21pm PST
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SC 114  How to Fail a Class
Direct download: sc_pod_114.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 11:15am PST
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SC 113  Boundaries and Balancing Your Life
Direct download: sc_pod_113.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:42pm PST
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SC 112  Peter, the Workaholic Professor
Direct download: sc_pod_112.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 12:03pm PST
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SC 111  Boundaries at Work
Direct download: sc_pod_111.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 6:00am PST
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SC 110 #4. Student Success
Direct download: sc_pod_110.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:43am PST
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Direct download: sc_109.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:28am PST
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SC 108 #2. Student Success
Direct download: sc_108.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 11:49am PST
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SC 107 #1. Student Success
Direct download: pod_107.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:08am PST
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SC 106  #5. Creating Positive Collegial Relationships
Direct download: pod_106.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:09pm PST
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Direct download: pod_105.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:36pm PST
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SC 104  #3. Creating Positive Collegial Relationships
Direct download: sc_104.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 1:00pm PST
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Direct download: sc_103.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:53pm PST
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Direct download: sc_102.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:46pm PST
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Direct download: sc_101.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 1:15pm PST
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Direct download: sc_100.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 1:30pm PST
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SC 99  #9. Course Evals: Learning
Direct download: sc_99.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 6:00am PST
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