Student Caring - A Podcast for Professors
Join professors de Roulet and Pecoraro as they encourage professors to achieve success.
SC 151 New Year Resolutions for Professors

SC 151 New Year Resolutions for Professors

 

Professor New Year Resolution #1: Learn how to learn all my students names.

  • Hey, you there in the third row – go ahead!
  • We find seating charts to be really helpful.
  • Many group assignments requiring students to say their names as they present is helpful as we hear their names repeatedly.

Professor New Year Resolution #2: Don’t fall behind in my grading.

  • Daniel practices the “Grade 5 papers a day” method.
  • Relative calm and order prevail when we don’t procrastinate.

Professor New Year Resolution #3: Eat healthier and drink less coffee.

  • We are unified in our resolve to ignore the ‘less coffee’ portion of this tip.
  • Why is it so difficulty for us to eat and drink what is good for us? Stress?

Professor New Year Resolution #4: Don’t say ‘yes’ to all potential committee assignment requests.

  • This can be difficult due to our commitment to shared governance.
  • If we do to much on this side of life, our teaching can suffer.
  • Decide where you can be most effective.

Professor New Year Resolution #5: Spend less time on the Internet

  • Our is not a thinking profession at all, is it?
  • The Internet can be a huge distraction for us and rob us of precious productive time.

Professor New Year Resolution #6: Don’t check email 20 times a day!

  • Why do we do this? We don’t want to miss anything!
  • Our students check their email – constantly.
  • Students and colleagues ask: “Did you get my email?”

Professor New Year Resolution #7: Improve my professorial wardrobe.

  • Do you dress like a professor? (We are not always successful in this area.)
  • At least, for the benefit of our students, look like a professor, it really matters.

We invite you to join us in 2016 and beyond by sharing your work with the international Student Caring community.

Opportunities for you join us:

  • Write a guest blog post about…
    • Your research
    • Something you are passionate about
    • Something you want to share with students, professors, or parents.

Announcing the debut of the “One Minute Office Hour“ on January 1, 2016.

Please – share this with all college students in your world, it would really mean a lot to us as we seek to help more and more students succeed in college.

One Minute Office Hour LogoStudents who most often do not come into our offices during our office hours could benefit from a one minute (TED TALK style) video that they could access on their smart phones or computers.

  • We welcome your contributions to this video cast, publishing every Friday.
  • To participate, email david@studentcaring.com and he will get back to you with participation details.
  • Have you always had something that you wanted to share with all college students? What are you known for? Here’s your chance to tell the world.

 

If you are interested in being a guest to this podcast, just let us know!

We are continuing our research for book #2: What Professors Wish Parents Knew About College.

If you are interested in being interviewed for this book, please let us know.
David is researching this book during his sabbatical leave, spring of 2016.

 

 We wish for you all, a Happy New Year!

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_151.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:04am PST
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SC 150 The Christmas Episode
Merry Christmas & Happy Holidays from Student Caring


Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 150 The Christmas Episode

 

We celebrate podcast 150 on Christmas Day, 2015!

We invite you to join us in 2016 and beyond by sharing your work with the international Student Caring community.

Opportunities for you join us:

  • Write a guest blog post about...
    • Your research
    • Something you are passionate about
    • Something you want to share with students, professors, or parents.

Announcing the debut of the "One Minute Office Hour" on January 1, 2016.

One Minute Office Hour LogoStudents who most often do not come into our offices during our office hours could benefit from a one minute (TED TALK style) video that they could access on their smart phones or computers.

  • We welcome your contributions to this video cast, publishing every Friday.
  • To participate, email david@studentcaring.com and he will get back to you with participation details.
  • Have you always had something that you wanted to share with all college students? What are you known for? Here's your chance to tell the world.

 

If you are interested in being a guest to this podcast, just let us know!

We are continuing our research for book #2: What Professors Wish Parents Knew About College.

If you are interested in being interviewed for this book, please let us know.
David is researching this book during his sabbatical leave, spring of 2016.

 

 We wish for you all, a wonderful Christmas & Holiday break!

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Next week: Episode #150! The Christmas Episode

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Direct download: sc_pod_150.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:47am PST
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SC 149 The Grade Challenge

Have you heard these comments?

STUDENT: There's no way I got that grade!

STUDENT: I am not quite sure I know how I did in the course, I just want to get a better grade. 

This line of thought is usually followed by an attempt at a grade negotiation with the prof.

 

Tips for professors:

  • Keep a good grade book.
  • All along the way, remind your students to check their grades.
  • Stand firm when communicating during a grade dispute.
  • From the first assignment, our grading approach lays the foundation for the final grade.
  • Students may ask: "Is there anything I can do to improve my grade?"
    • All too often, we hear this question.
    • To accommodate this, it should be a terrific reason.
    • Every time we make a choice, it sets the standard for all current and future students.
  • Your student may not approach you directly and go over your head.
    • When this occurs, your chair or dean should refer them back to you.
    • The professor has the knowledge and control of the grading.
    • After the initial conversation, if the student still wants to pursue a grade change we refer them to the college policy. You are not under any obligation to continue to discuss the matter.
  • We are often challenged during these difficult situations with students.
  • The grade earned could be end of their college career.
  • This moment of truth could place them on academic probation.
  • We need to to the best that we possibly can to write exams that are fair and tell us what we need to know about the students progress.
  • Don't second guess your decision to the student, this can communicate that you are not certain about what you are doing.

 

 We wish for you all, a wonderful holiday break!

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Next week: Episode #150! The Christmas Episode

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_149.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:38am PST
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SC 148 The Office Party

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 148 The Office Party

 

Tips for the party planners:

  • Your attendees will be comparing your party to previous parties.
  • Employees will draw conclusions, “Oh, we must be cutting back on the expenses.” “Oh, if we can afford to spend money like this, what about my real needs a professor, what about an increase in salary?”
  • Know that every party sets an expectation level.
  • Don’t recognize employees for years of service with small meaningles trinkets. It is better to simply give a certificate.

Tips for party goers:

  • If you are participating in a gift exchange, select your gift wisely. You don’t want to embarrass anyone.
  • An office party is not a party with friends. It is a professional party.
  • Whatever you do at the office party will be remembered for years.
  • How do you dress for the office party?
    • Dress better than your usual day to day attire.
    • Perhaps a holiday tie?
    • Women will want to proceed with caution, this is not a cocktail party.
  • Don’t talk about work! That really puts a damper on a holiday party atmosphere.
  • Don’t be a pig! This is the time for you to demonstrate your best social skills.
  • All things in moderation. If you drink, be very cautious about your alcohol intake.
  • Remember, most everyone has a camera in their pocket or purse these days. You don’t want your embarrassing behavior to end up on the Internet.
  • Remember, if you bring a guest, their behavior will reflect on you. How much of your personal life do you want to share with your colleagues?
  • Relax, but be professional and dignified.

 

 We wish for you all,  wonderful office parties!

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Next week: When a student challenges your grade.

 

We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Professors - David & Daniel

 

Direct download: sc_pod_148.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 4:42pm PST
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SC 147 Finals Week

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 147 Finals Week

 

How we can help our students during finals week.

  • We can be positive and not let our (perhaps) our true feelings about how we are feeling become known.
  • Resist the urge to pack in as much materiel as we can. Our students are not in a strong learning mode at this time of the semester.

How we can help ourselves during finals week.

  • Do we make less comments when grading finals? Yes. Grade them well, but know that students don't usually pick them up.
  • We are grading, end of the year assessments rather than providing comments for improvement.
  • David paces his finals grading to meet rather than beat the grade submission deadline.
  • Daniel advises that we get enough sleep so we can be rested for our grading tasks.
  • Consider a faculty grading party at a fun location.

 We wish for you all, a very good final week of the semester!

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Professors - David & Daniel

 

Direct download: sc_pod_147.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:50pm PST
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SC 146 How to Talk About World Events in Class

SC 146 How to Talk About World Events in Class

Responding to terror in France

How we can help our students process significant world events.

  • Give your students a question to write about in class and follow it up with a moderated group discussion.
  • Ask your students to take a position and write about it. The purpose of the assignment is not to improve their writing, but to get them to talk about it.
  • Discussion rules are established:
    • Only one student may speak at a time.
    • No one is allowed to interrupt anyone else.
    • You have to be called upon to speak.
    • No one is allowed to react to anyone else opinion.
  • We are teaching them how to have academic conversations.
  • We want to create a safe place in our classrooms where students can speak their minds. Where else in our society today can we safely do that?
  • Our students tend to be socially connected with each other, but not as much with global issues.

Our hearts go out the people of France.

 We want to encourage our students not to give into the fear.
We have life experiences to offer students.

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Professors - David & Daniel

 

Direct download: sc_pod_146.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:28am PST
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SC 145 STOP!  STOP!   STOP!

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 145 STOP! STOP! STOP!

 

Take a Christmas or holiday break.

Avoiding professorial burnout.

  • Daniel went on strike last weekend! He took a weekend off which resulted in a good Monday morning.
  • NOTE: This is not for you if you don’t have any problems stopping for the break.
  • Are you looking forward to the holiday break so you can get ready for next semester?
  • You (Yes YOU!) need to take a break from being a professor.

How can we achieve this?

  • Distance yourself from the elements of your work. Perhaps that is a laptop computer?
  • Any activity other than working as a professor will give you a rest.
  • Eliminate that worry about the first day of classes by preparing between now and the end of finals week.
  • Think about what you will want to accomplish, non work-wise, over your holiday break. Plan some activities that don’t involve using your head.
  • A change in environment can help you to disconnect from work.
  • Do not go to your campus!
  • Go to a place where there is no Internet.
  • TIP:  You might not want to tell your colleagues, during finals week: “I am 100% ready for the first day of classes!”

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Professors - David & Daniel

Direct download: sc_pod_145.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 2:35pm PST
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SC 144 Student Centered Teaching

SC 144 Student Centered Teaching

As we record this the Santa Ana winds are blowing in Southern California.
Daniel recommends the writings of Joan Didian The Santa Anas.

STUDENT CARING MOMENT

Helping students with their stress:

  • Students are usually trying to solve many problems at once. Talk them through their situations one-by-one. When the situations are broken down into individual moments, it can help them to manage their stress.
  • Worrying is helpful in small doses but honestly, would it help?

Teaching Styles

Student centered teaching

  • This doesn’t have to be all or nothing, we can blend our teaching styles to provide variety in the classroom.
  • Often, Daniel will teach two-thirds of class in lecture mode, then switch to a student guided activity for the remainder of the class.
  • We can orchestrate a reversal of roles where the student is now the teacher. As we well know, you have to know a topic really well before you attempt to teach it to others.
  • We can place students in charge by assigning them a topic to present that will enhance the learning experience for all students. Now, “The Sage on the Stage” is the student and not the professor.
  • This approach brings the students work into the spotlight as they show us how much they are learning. These presentations, when done well, result in the student feeling very proud of their work.
  • This method of teaching will tell you more about what they learning than a final exam.
  • When your students are presenting, lack of engagement is not an option.

 

We move from being the “Sage on the Stage” to the “Guide on the Side.”

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Professors - David & Daniel

 

Direct download: sc_pod_144.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:29pm PST
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SC 143 Teaching Styles: Teacher or Student Centered?

NEWS / Watch for our podcast on the new Google Play network. Coming soon!

STUDENT CARING MOMENT

Stay in touch with your former students. We find that Facebook can help us to be available to our students who want to share their life experiences with us.

Our former student can provide a perspective of what life is like after college to current students.

Teaching Styles

Teacher centered approach

  • Often thought of as "Old School"
  • The professor lectures, the students listen and take notes.
  • The teach is the formal authority and expert.

Student centered approach

  • Inquiry based learning
  • The teacher is working more as a coach or facilitator.
  • The teacher is seen as the more experienced learner among peers.

We use a combination of these two styles.

  • We remember "The Sage on the Stage" and overhead projectors!
  • Our professors were usually the ones who wrote the textbook we were learning from.
  • There is high value to a person who is an expert and who writes text books.
  • Lecturing for 18 weeks can be sure fire way to put your students to sleep.
  • At some point, the professor needs to be the expert in the classroom.
  • A variety in teaching styles can be achieved with a variety courses with a four-year program.

Length of class time dictates that we vary our teaching styles.

  • A five hour course necessitates a very different style of teaching than a 50 minute course.
  • Students nowadays have less tolerance for an all lecture class.
  • Our students are living in a world where the get information in little bits. They are also living in a world where information comes to them on screens.
  • Breaking up your lecture with multi-media helps communicate a point and keep the students attention.
  • Giving our students a chance to interact with each other takes them to the next level of learning. Daniel: " I want to see them processing the information."
  • When all students present information, they are exposed to many opinions about a topic.

One of the most important things we can do as professors to ask a very good and thought provoking questions.

The question, as you might imagine, provoked a lively conversation where the students were all engaged in the topic. I am careful to not share my opinion on a topic, rather to seek out their opinions.

What are you experiences with these teaching styles?

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We welcome your comments, feedback and guest post submissions.

 

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Professors - David & Daniel

 

Direct download: sc_pod_143.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:45pm PST
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SC 142 Violence on College Campuses

Notes from the Student Caring Podcast for Professors

SC 142 Violence on College Campuses

 

IN THE NEWS / USA TODAY:  Fatal Tenn. campus shooting started over dice game.

Unfortunately, campus violence is nothing new, in fact it has become the current version of “Going Postal.”

How are professors and students reacting to violence on campus?

  • Before and immediately after 911 airplanes were targets, today the targets are places of learning, our places of business.
  • These incidences, though few and far between, have become regular and are often in the back of our mind.
  • On college tours, we now hear, all the time, parents asking: “How safe is your campus?” “What do your campus police reports show?” “What do you have in place to respond to an active shooter?”
  • We are at a disadvantage due to the open nature of a college campus.

How does this affect us as professors?

  • Knowing that our classroom doors can now be locked from the inside plants the thought: “What will I do if an active shooter is on my campus?”
  • You can imagine that our students and their parents are also thinking about violence on our campuses.
  • After a shooting, faculty are thinking: “I’m looking at my students differently.”
  • When we are thinking about the possibility of violence in our classroom, we are not 100% focused on our teaching. On the other side of the lectern, our students are not 100% thinking about learning.
  • Education needs to happen in a safe place, in an environment without distraction.

How colleges are trying to cope with this.

  • Daniel: “I have made a conscious effort, not to have my teaching style change.” “I will not give into this notion of fear.”
  • A professor at Daniel’s college set up a memorial for the victims of the shooting in Oregon. This allowed the community an opportunity to express their fears, concerns, and emotions about the incident.
  • One of the things that we professors are good at is having rational conversations about difficult topics.
  • We can lead our campuses and classrooms in conversations about this topic, which moves everyone toward not “bottling up” their emotions.

After a campus shooting:

  • Our students hear the news and become more fearful.
  • Parents are now concerned more than before. “I am going to send my college kid a text to make sure they are okay.”
  • Colleges remind everyone about the procedures that they have in place for an active shooter.

How can we help our students when a shooting occurs?

  • We can educate our students about the facts and statistics of violence on college campuses. “You know, these are extremely isolated incidences.”
  • We don’t want to treat these horrible situations like: “This is what is happening everywhere all the time.”
  • We can speak and write our opinions about the violence and encourage our students to do the same.
  • We need to brainstorm and develop solutions to these problems.
  • How do we want our campuses to look in 5 years?
  • We can teach civility, conflict resolution, and mediation.

 

“My college years were the best years of my life.” – Let’s not lose that.

 

What are you experiencing as a result of violence on our campuses?

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We welcome your feedback to our work.
What are you struggling with?
How many days until a holiday break?
Have you submitted your text book requests for next semester?

Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_pod_142.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:36pm PST
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