Student Caring - A Podcast for Professors
Join professors de Roulet and Pecoraro as they encourage professors to achieve success.

Preventing Student Dying 

It is not supposed to be like this.

The focus, and often pride, of so many families is seeing their daughter or son off to college—a place of hopes, bright futures, and new beginnings.  Yet, estimates from the National Institute on Alcohol, Abusive, and Alcoholism (part of the governmental NIH) places the number of college students who die from alcohol-related causes at 1,825 annually. A practice growing more popular on college campuses called synergy—the mixing of drug and alcohol to produce new experiences—can cause catastrophic physiological effects as well.  According to a university website on health and wellness, when cocaine is combined with alcohol, “cocaine increases heart rate three to five times as much as when either drug is given alone. This can lead to heart attacks and heart failure.” People at the beginning of their adult lives should not be facing the end of their lives… (read more)

This week in Student Caring, we bring you a podcast interviewing one of our friends, and a friend to college students at risk, Dr. Don Lubach.  We spent a day on his campus, the University of California at Santa Barbara, attending an annual summit and speaking to Don and his colleagues about what caring campuses can do to help students who place themselves at risk.

First, a little background is helpful.  In case your notions of drugs and alcohol on campus revolve around either memories tempered by time movies such as Animal House, the CDC weighs in on the problem.  It states that the intermediate effects of something like binge drinking (consuming four or more drinks) have serious immediate and long-term side effects—and we’re not even bringing mixing drugs and alcohol into the picture.  According to CDC studies, immediate effects of binge drinking include unintended trauma (including traffic accidents), falls, drownings, burns, and unintentional firearm injuries.  Effects can also include abuse (including “intimate partner violence”), risky sexual behavior that can end in sexual assault, and alcohol poisoning—a medical emergency.  Alcohol abuse over the long term can work with other physiological and psychological problems to result in addiction, severe depression and anxiety, cardiovascular and neurological issues, and liver disease.

Even limiting the discussion to student success, the effects of even short term use of alcohol or drugs on education can be devastating as well.  Have you ever wondered about a student’s academic performance or changes to his or her behavior?  How can professors identify students in their classes who are at risk, and what should we as professors do?  What level of risks are our students experiencing?

Join us for an important podcast, “Preventing Student Dying.”

- Dr. Daniel de Roulet

We welcome your feedback to this podcast and our work: YOU MAY Go to iTunes and write a review or simply, in iTunes, click on STAR to rate us. – we would really appreciate that! Email us!

Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com  OR David: david@studentcaring.com

OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL – FREE voice number,

1 – (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s – 1 -(855)639-9292

THIS EPISODE WAS RECORDED ON Friday, March 1, 2013

PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY You may find us on: Twitter Facebook Google+ and Pinterest

At STUDENT CARING DOT COM – You may also sign up for our free NEWSLETER - That way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming Book:  The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching.

Direct download: pod_35.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 12:24pm PDT
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Responding To Our Students

In this blogpost / podcast we comment on our interviews of the two previous podcasts with Mr. Micah Stratton and Ms. Tasha Levin.

Here are the statements we comment on:

  • Micha:  "I want my class time to count."
  • Micha:  "You have to make us think for ourselves."
  • Micha:  "We are only taking the general education courses because we have to."
  • Micha:  "I think the most popular one (struggle) is time management."
  • Micha:  "I have seen the looks on their (Seniors) faces and they have no ideal what they are doing after they graduate."
  • Tasha:  "After taking a break 'in the real world,' I realized how important an education is and that you can't get anywhere without it."
  • Tasha:  "RATE MY PROFESSORS DOT COM, it's a tool that has never failed me, ever."
  • Tasha:  "I am seeing the teacher turning away students who are trying to get in."
  • Tasha:  "It is the atmosphere that you create as a teacher. That helps to set the pace for the entire semester."

LINKS REFERENCED IN THIS EPISODE

Teaching Academic Survival and Success - Conference

aSleep App - Source of the beach and sea gull sounds.

Teaching and the Case Study Method - Discussion Based Teaching

Rate My Professors dot com.

Apple Movie Trailers.

This episode was recorded in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida on Tuesday, March 19, 2013.

[box] AN INVITATION TO THE STUDENT CARING COMMUNITY:

Students, Professors, Parents, and all of higher education, we invite your feedback on these important topics. Thank you.

[/box]

You May:

Go to iTunes and write a review or simply, in iTunes, click on STAR to rate us. - we would really appreciate that!

Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com  David: david@studentcaring.com

Respond to the BLOG on STUDENTCARING . COM

OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL - FREE voice number, 1 - (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s - 1 -(855) 639-9292

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING & PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY

You may find us on:

Twitter Facebook Google + Pinterest

This way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming eBook and Audio program:  The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching.

 

Direct download: pod_34.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:50pm PDT
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Understanding Our Students - Tasha

In this blogpost / podcast we interview our special guest, Ms. Tasha Levin who shares her thoughts about her experiences while in college and responds to our questions.

Here are some highlights from the podcast.

STUDENT CARING:  "What has college been like for you?"

"I felt really lost in a large university."

"I did not know where to go."

"My biggest challenge in California is getting into classes."

"I was number 32 on the petition list!"

STUDENT CARING: "We often now have waiting lists that are larger than the classes."

"Half these kids are going to flake out in two week anyways, LET ME IN!"

STUDENT CARING: "What are the difficulties that students face in College today?

"There is no guarantee at the end that you will get a job, it is very disheartening."

"Students don't take their education seriously."

"It took me a little while to stand up to my parents."

STUDENT CARING: "How do you balance being a student full time and working full time?"

"I learned to prioritize my education as number one."

"My employer allows my education to be my number one priority.

STUDENT CARING: "Can you identify what makes a class great?"

"I enjoy the classes the most when a teacher incorporates us into the discussion."

"I appreciate a break during a lecture."

"It gets our brains moving when we break into groups."

"When the teacher learns everybody's names you feel like a person."

STUDENT CARING: "When do things not go so well in a class?"

"It is exactly like the teacher on 'Wonder Years', boring, the teacher answers all the questions."

STUDENT CARING: "How do you decide which class / professor to take?"

"RATE MY PROFESSOR DOT COM. Almost every person uses this. It is a tool that has never failed me."

"Many times, a student just wants an easy class, they just want to get the grade."

STUDENT CARING: "Does RATE MY PROFESSOR DOT COM influence your course evaluations ?"

"I give my heartfelt evaluation at the end, how else are they going to know?"

STUDENT CARING: "What's your opinion of your fellow students?"

"In Boston, everybody was paying tens of thousands for each class, everybody was very serious."

"Here, (in California) students are more open, it is very diverse."

STUDENT CARING: "How do you think students feel about general education classes?"

"I think a lot of students feel resentful. You know your not going to use it for the rest of your life."

STUDENT CARING: "What advice do you have for administrators and professors?"

"You don't know what is in a students mind until you ask them. People who are older are so far separated, they are not equipped to make those decisions at all.

STUDENT CARING: "Since you will be a teacher one day, what do you think will be most important for you to bring into the classroom as a teacher?"

"I say, it is the atmosphere that you create as a teacher. The class feeds upon that. When they are excited about what they are teaching the students follow through."

"When a professor is really boring, I can't take it."

"A professor can change a class from day to night.  Come in with a smile!"

STUDENT CARING: "Thank you Tasha!"

This episode was recorded in Southern California on Tuesday, February 26, 2013.

[box] AN INVITATION TO THE STUDENT CARING COMMUNITY:

Students, Professors, Parents, and all of higher education, we invite your feedback on these important questions and on the answers given by Ms. Tasah Levin. Thank you.

[/box]

You May:

Go to iTunes and write a review or simply, in iTunes, click on STAR to rate us. - we would really appreciate that!

Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com  David: david@studentcaring.com

Respond to the BLOG on STUDENTCARING . COM

OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL - FREE voice number, 1 - (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s - 1 -(855) 639-9292

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING & PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY

You may find us on:

Twitter Facebook Google + Pinterest

This way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming eBook and Audio program:  The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching.

Direct download: pod_33.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 6:22pm PDT
Comments[0]

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