Student Caring - A Podcast for Professors
Join professors de Roulet and Pecoraro as they encourage professors to achieve success.

SC 62 Going Home for the Holidays

In this episode, Daniel and David offer helpful tips for students and their families to consider for the mid-year holiday break.
travel

Holiday Break Tips

  • Communicate with your families, ahead of time, what your plans are for the time when you will be back home.
  • Ahead of time, schedule how you will use your time back home.
  • Students, if your family is in multiple locations, discuss with them what you and they need for the holiday break.
  • Be careful not to put to many expectations for this time in between semesters.
  • Do those special things that you are not able to when classes are in session.

 We wish for all of you the happiest of holiday breaks!

We are busy planning many remarkable resources for your for 2014 and beyond!

 

 

Please share. 

We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Thank you!

Daniel & David

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Direct download: sc_62.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 4:07pm PST
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The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching 

 

Now available on:  Amazon.

In this podcast we discuss the book and the journey we have on while writing it over the past three years.

The first section of the book, Teaching 101, looks at student-professor interactions, discussing:

  • The changing landscape of higher education and why many students feel disconnected from their educational experiences.
  • A brief outline of the expectations of students today compared to the expectations of professor’s university experiences.
  • A look at the financial landscapes that confront students and interfere with learning.
  • Academic preparedness.
  • The difficulties of teaching in a culture in which negotiation sometimes replaces hard work.
  • The importance of establishing clear and wise boundaries with students.
  • Establishing and keeping connections with students in the classroom during the semester to improve student learning.

Teaching 102 discusses putting together and nurturing successful courses based on a foundation of care for your students’ academic growth and well-being. Subjects include:

  • Intentionally setting the tone and establishing rapport instead of letting the frenetic first days of the term set the tone of a course.
  • Reinforcing tone and cementing expectations during the first course meetings.
  • The art of effective record keeping to track student progress.
  • Learning-goal-oriented course design, organization, and reflection.
  • Recognizing symptoms and causes of a class “going bad.” The need to carefully diagnose symptoms, understand student perceptions, and reactions, and see how the symptoms can negatively affect a class.
  • Changing the trajectory of a class that has gone off track. Strategies include responding early, checking in with students, not allowing the class to drift from its goals, and building a community of colleagues who are willing to discuss course remedies in confidence.
  • Ending a class well. Ways in which students can be actively involved in the end-of-term assessments of their knowledge, understanding, and skills. Preparing for a final course meeting that leaves students both clear about how the course’s goals have been met and confident in seeing how the skills of a particular academic discipline may be applied to their education.

Teaching 103 presents advanced strategies and background for addressing trends and difficult situations in education today, and for helping students succeed:

  • Classes that encourage critical thinking and introduce students to the expectations of college academic life.
  • The stages of intellectual development most students will experience, and how to appropriately move them along that continuum in preparation for college work and life beyond college.
  • Caring for students in online settings, addressing online learning’s additional challenges in knowing one’s audience, fostering community, and keeping a course on track.
  • Strategies for addressing difficult student encounters.
  • “Career Directions and Your Students’ Daily Bread” introduces students to the idea of a vocation, and discusses practical aspects of entering the work force, internships and apprenticeships, and graduate work.

The Caring Professor from Student Caring

 

We recorded this podcast on Tuesday, November 26, 2013

 

Please share. 

We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Thank you!

Daniel & David

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Direct download: sc_61.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 4:30am PST
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Symptoms of a Class Headed South

We wrote in an earlier chapter of Learning 102 about how poorly we often perceive our own work in classes—we and our students go through ups and downs, convinced one day that we are masters of the universe, and perfectly convinced on other days that, if we get out right now, there still may be something else in life for us to do.

What we would like to do is take you away from this mode of manic-depression, this catastrophic good and bad thinking, in which the world is either terrible or wonderful based essentially on feelings or on the success or lack thereof of a specific class meeting.  Instead, we want to help you to become good, rational diagnosticians of your own classrooms.  Below is a list of symptoms that need to be taken seriously.  Before you read this, don’t worry—remember that we believe that practically any class-gone-bad can be salvaged by both professors and students.  We’ll deal with solutions soon, but we first want you to get a sense of what to watch for.

Symptom 1:  Disengagement

The majority of the students are clearly not engaged in what is happening in the classroom.  A few students may be sleeping or on the verge.  The class lacks a spark, a sense among students and the professor that “that was a great class.”  The symptoms of a lack of engagement might be that you find yourself in significant competition with smart phones and computer screens.  A number of students in the class might be holding quiet (or not so quiet) conversations during your lectures or when others are speaking that demonstrate their interest is elsewhere.  Not more than a predictable core group of students are talking; as a rule of thumb, you would like to see about one half of the students in the class participating voluntarily on a regular basis.

Symptom 2:  Attrition

Students drop early or in a slow trickle during the semester. While the former can denote a basic misunderstanding of what the class was to be about, more commonly early drops are a judgment on the students’ desire to commit to a professor and a subject matter.  Significant attrition clearly should be seen as a problem symptom—it is something that David and I have looked for as program directors or as department chairs, and it usually is a call for intervention before things get ugly.  During tight enrollment times, attrition should be seen as an alarming sign.

Symptom 3:  Absences and Tardiness

Attendance problems and tardiness problems are often not only symptoms of a lack of student engagement with the subject matter, but can point to an atmosphere established in which students believe that absenteeism and tardiness are acceptable behaviors.  Of more concern is what we call a ballet of non-attendance—not difficulties with a few students, but different students not attending from class to class, almost as if students are choreographing tardiness and absences.  When this is happening, students may be sending the signal that either what is happening in class is not to be taken seriously, or that they have no hope of understanding the material.  A pattern of tardiness by many members of the class can attest to student schedules, but more likely this behavior is a sign of the lack of a respectful relationship between students and professor.

Symptom 4:  “Alone, Together”

The class has not established a sense of community.  Students clearly do not know each other and seem in no hurry to interact.  Students do not know even each other’s names, or the professor has not learned the students’ names.  Why is this a problem? Unless we are natural salespeople, name learning is a process that takes place through interaction and engagement.  If you do not know someone’s name, chances are you do not really want to know it.  (Of course, if you are Daniel’s brother-in-law who really does want to learn names but ends up calling everyone “buddy,” then we might have a different problem.)  A class that has built community shows enthusiasm when asked to engage in small group assignments or when it responds to student presentations.

Symptom 5:  “I Sense Tension”

One of our favorite memories from Star Trek, the Next Generation was the empathic Lt. Troy’s task of sitting on the bridge and uttering this remark whenever Romulans were blasting the ship to smithereens.  Students may not be doing well with the other students in the class.  There may be tension between students, or a history of inappropriate statements made.  This is a management issue for the professor, who is looked at by students as the person responsible for setting and maintaining a responsible tone in the classroom.  It may also indicate that students are reflecting a professor’s attitude that not all students in the class are worthy of respect.

Symptom 6:  Poor Grades

As a group, students are not performing well on assessments (tests, papers, and projects).  Contrary to some professors’ views, this is not necessarily a sign of rigor.  This can be a sign that the class is being pitched well above the level of the students’ capabilities, or that the assessments themselves are not clearly written and explained.

Symptom 7:  Lack of Respect

An open lack of respect towards the professor is a serious warning signal.  Even if the behavior is limited to one student who does not reflect the greater attitude of the class, this situation can become viral—it can hijack the tone for the class.  More than one student acting in this manner usually denotes a passive-aggressive attitude that is masking more serious problems of authority, credibility, and student frustration.

Symptom 8:  The “Temperature” of the Room

How do you feel when you walk into the room? A professor’s attitude towards his or her class may negatively change as the semester goes on.  Sometimes this is easier to hear in others than in yourself.  You may not have the enthusiasm for the class you hoped you would have; you may be looking forward to the class coming to an end.  Your stress may increase before the class is scheduled to meet.

Symptom 9:  Disruption

Students can become disruptive in class.  We usually think of this as unhappy or discourteous behavior, but disruptive students can be happy or angry.  Whichever is the case, students are no longer connecting to the class, and the behavior masks deeper problems about how worthwhile the students believe the class really is.

Symptom 10:  The Worst-Case Scenario

Students might actually tell the professor that the class is not working.  The instances of students getting up the nerve to do this are rare.  David tells a story of a professor who had taken over a class at mid-term and of a student sitting in the front row who, at the beginning of a class period, leaned forward and whispered, “Professor, you need to know that everyone in here hates you right now.”

 

[box] Copyright ©2013 The Student Caring Project. All rights reserved. Unless otherwise indicated, all materials on these pages are copyrighted by Dr. Daniel de Roulet and Prof. David Pecoraro, C0-Founders of The Student Caring Project. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore, reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or retransmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictly prohibited without prior written permission.[/box]

COMMENTARY

Daniel and David discuss this topic.

 

We recorded this podcast on Friday, November 1, 2013

 

Please share. 

We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

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Direct download: sc_60.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:08am PST
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First Impressions

We have heard stories from students and from listeners to our podcasts about initial impressions of professors that turned out not to be correct, but that nevertheless persisted throughout the term, despite a professor’s best efforts or intentions. Simply knowing students by name and using their names early in class (a challenge for some of us) can send a message of professorial caring and commitment to a class.  Some of our listeners have commented on the demeanor or dress of a professor in the classroom and the misinterpretations this can cause.  Remember, however, that establishing the academic tone and your enthusiasm about the academic subject matter is critical.  On the first day of classes, avoid talking about the requirements of the course.  Instead, concentrate on establishing both a welcoming and a rigorous academic atmosphere.

Some of the following suggestions are counterintuitive, but have worked for us.  We suggest you at least try them out in a course or two.   

(1) Jump into the subject matter by choosing a particularly interesting topic, and show your enthusiasm for it.  Keep in mind your range of learners and learning styles as you do this and present the materials in ways that you expect the students to be able to receive them during the course of the semester.  For example, your presentation could present expertise and content through periods of the lecture in which students are expected to take notes and to begin to understand the themes of the course.  The “text” of the class—that which you and the students will examine together, be it a book, piece of art, building, formula, experiment, etc.—can be displayed and engaged during the class session.  You may want to work into the first day a meaningful exercise in which students interact with the course material and each other in order to begin to build community.

[box] THIS IS A SPECIAL PREVIEW OF OUR BOOK: The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching. Publishing Worldwide on November 26, 2013 via Amazon and the iBook store.[/box]

(2) Set aside some of the time to build a community atmosphere by allowing you and the students to get to know each other.  David does an exercise in which he (with student permission) asks them to form a line, and then shakes the hand of each, handing each of them a syllabus and taking their pictures with his smart phone so that he can more quickly learn their names.

(3) Set aside time at the end of the first class meeting to allow for student questions about the class and about the college or university generally.  You might want to invite students to walk with you to your office after class, or you might project (or distribute) a map on how to find your office.

(4) In the rush of the first few days, establish some down time outside of class to be aware of students who might need help.  Students whose first language is not English, students with disabilities, and students new to the idea of college or university have entered an environment that is set up for insiders.  A colleague of Daniel’s, despite the almost calamitous hurriedness of a recent semester’s first week, took the time to walk a particularly lost student to class.  Imagine the effect this action may have had on this student. This, thought the student, is the kind of college where professors care enough about my success to go out of their way for me on the first day of class and to even talk with me during the process.

(5) During the first days of class, do not be afraid to explain the obvious in the classroom.  Impress upon students the joys and responsibilities of being a college or university student; talk to them about the differences your class will have from their high school experiences, or from lower-level college courses in regards to subject matter and expected student skills and investment. (Daniel, for example, briefly describes the differences in expectations between a pre-college and college-level composition course as similar to advancing from Algebra 1 to Algebra 2:  students will need to use some of the skills learned in Algebra 1, but the mastery of those skills alone do not guarantee success in Algebra 2.)

(6) Remember that the first day of classes is your opportunity to gain an academic snapshot of your students.  Survey them.  Get a sense of their expectations, expertise, questions, past academic experiences in the subject matters, concerns, hopes, and fears.  The first day should be thought of as a high point in getting to know the audience that is in front of you.

 

[box] Copyright ©2013 The Student Caring Project. All rights reserved. Unless otherwise indicated, all materials on these pages are copyrighted by Dr. Daniel de Roulet and Prof. David Pecoraro, C0-Founders of The Student Caring Project. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore, reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or retransmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictly prohibited without prior written permission.[/box]

COMMENTARY

Daniel and David discuss this topic.

 

We recorded this podcast on Friday, November 1, 2013

 

Please share. 

We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Thank you!

Daniel & David

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Direct download: sc_59.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:22am PST
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SC 58 #2. The Caring Professor - Book Preview

Only a little over 50% of American college students earn bachelors’ degrees in four years.  When students write essays or reports, or take exams our classes, anything under 60% constitutes failure.

Welcome to today’s world of higher education—an environment where more students than ever before, from just about every imaginable demographic, seek college degrees and often do not receive them.  Higher education continually invests more resources into admissions, co-curricular programs, retention studies, and graduation plans, but graduation rates remain unsatisfactory, students take longer to meet their degree requirements (so much so that colleges now budget for significant student attrition), and, for learners, the consequences of dropping out or stopping out have become disastrous.

Recently the State of Oregon invested a considerable effort to determine why graduation rates were so low in a particular population of students.  Researchers went into the project expecting to make recommendations on how institutions could spend additional money on programs that would address this problem.  But the answer wasn’t money in particular (although more investment in today’s schools is needed).  The study found that the most significant factor in keeping students in college and seeing them through to graduation is culturally sensitive care from professors.  Professors who know about, care about, and invest in their students’ learning often make the difference between success and failure.

[box] THIS IS A SPECIAL PREVIEW OF OUR BOOK: The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching. Publishing Worldwide on November 26, 2013 via Amazon and the iBook store.[/box]

Students look to professors as the people who will help most to pull them through the labyrinth of gaining a college degree.  When this connection with professors does not occur, students often feel disconnected from their educations, discouraged, and lost.  Despite whatever requirements a college or university communicates regarding research, publishing or performance, committee work, or the necessity of meetings, professors will spend the great majority of their time in the classroom, creating lesson plans and evaluating student work.  Professors primarily teach.  We also know that far too many full-time professors have not heard as much as they need about becoming excellent teachers.   A new professor might in fact enter the profession with a list of unanswered questions:

  • How do I successfully impart my knowledge to my students?
  • How do I make students enthusiastic about my courses?
  • Am I prepared to meet the range of my students’ educational needs?
  • How will my students, my colleagues, and administrators judge my efforts in the classroom?
  • How do I follow in the footsteps of professors that I respected?
  • How do I communicate to my students that I care about their welfare, and how do I keep from being taken advantage of by dishonest or panicked students?
  • How do I know my students are learning?

We're here to offer some help.

[box] Copyright ©2013 The Student Caring Project. All rights reserved. Unless otherwise indicated, all materials on these pages are copyrighted by Dr. Daniel de Roulet and Prof. David Pecoraro, C0-Founders of The Student Caring Project. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore, reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or retransmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictly prohibited without prior written permission.[/box]

COMMENTARY

Daniel and David discuss this topic.

 

We recorded this podcast on Tuesday, October 15, 2013

 

Please share. 

We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Thank you!

book2_cc

The Caring Professor  |  Student Caring
Direct download: sc_58.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 1:00pm PST
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Congratulations:  You’ve Been Thrown into the PoolStudent Caring

Scenario 1:  The Water is Cold

A new professor walks into an Introduction to Sociology course.  He is greeted by thirty students not on the roster who want to enroll.  Several students on the roster are either absent or wander in at some point during the class.  Few students have the textbooks.  Many seem unengaged.  What the new professor had planned as a rousing talk on what sociology is all about and its importance to our world today devolves into an hour of roster adjustment, syllabus reading, and instructions on what students need to do in order to be prepared for the next class meeting.

[box] THIS IS A SPECIAL PREVIEW OF OUR BOOK: The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching. Publishing Worldwide on November 26, 2013. [/box]

The next class meeting seems to be going a little better.  Our new professor, after making further roster adjustments and handing out additional copies of the syllabus (or directing, again, students to the class web site to obtain documents and assignments), actually begins to lecture.  Students take notes.  The lecture is interrupted twice, however—once by a student who is enrolled but “couldn’t attend the first day” and another time by a small group of students who enter the classroom and wonder if any spaces are available.  Our professor presses on.  Then, about half way through his lecture, he asks questions and comes to the conclusion that most of the students did not complete the reading for today. He gives an impromptu quiz, finishes (part of) his lecture, and realizes that he is about a course meeting behind where he wants to be in imparting the course content.

During his next two lectures, he rushes through the material to catch up.  Students should be taking notes, but many are just listening; one or two are gazing out the window.  Some seem to be texting.  Attendance is not the best.  The scores on the quiz were miserable.  As he introduces the first essay assignment, he mentions (having heard the low down from his colleagues) that academic dishonesty is something to be taken very seriously, and that he will be on the lookout.  One or two students ask questions about small details that are clearly stated on the assignment sheet and the course syllabus.  He notices that a good number of students have not brought the book to class—can it be that some students still have not bought the book?  One student asks a question that seems to have an edge to it at the end of lecture; he does not know how to respond, given that he does not remember his professors answering such questions.

Not everyone turns in the first essay, and when he distributes the first exam—clearly stated on the syllabus’s course schedule—not everyone is present and some seem surprised that an exam is being given. At the end of class that day, a few students approach him and ask if they can still hand in the essay for full credit even though it will be late.  One student has apparently simply left a late essay on the podium.  In subsequent course meetings, student questions become more infrequent.  One day, five minutes into a lecture, a student raises his hand and asks if there will be a review session for the upcoming midterm.  Several students in the back of the class are talking quietly; others are texting.  At the end of another class, two students come up to appeal their essay grades.  Upon returning to his office, he receives an email that the department chair would like to meet with him regarding a student complaint.

What has happened, he thinks?  Who are these unprepared, indifferent, and sometimes even hostile students?  He has just been trying to teach the course material. Perhaps he needs to be tougher.

 [box] Copyright ©2013 The Student Caring Project. All rights reserved. Unless otherwise indicated, all materials on these pages are copyrighted by Dr. Daniel de Roulet and Prof. David Pecoraro, C0-Founders of The Student Caring Project. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore, reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or retransmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictly prohibited without prior written permission.[/box]

COMMENTARY

Daniel and David discuss solutions to this scenario.

 

We recorded this podcast on Tuesday, October 15, 2013


 

Share. 

Our upcoming book:The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching, was written with feedback from many educators and students, which was our plan all along. We began by outlining our thoughts on a series of topics, then we recorded them to share with the world. From the feedback we received, we were informed about the needs of the student caring community. We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous  Teaching

 

 

Direct download: sc_57.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:00pm PST
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Daniel and David interview Adjunct Professor, Dr. Melissa Knoll.

Melissa | Student Caring

Sound Bites from the Podcast:

The workload is huge!
I have a colleague who teaches 6 classes in one day.
I wasn’t quite prepared for the commute time, it can be grueling.
Q: What are the biggest challenges being an adjunct professor?
A: Not having an office. It would give me a sense of respectability and place.
I feel like a second class citizen.
I meet with students by a planter or a coffee cart area.
It can be challenging to keep up with current pedagogy.
I try to keep my quality of life pretty good.
If I have grading time, that’s what I do.
I spend an hour and a half grading every day - and that’s with only 75 students.
Am I going to prioritize my pedagogy or my time as a researcher? As an adjunct, you have to choose.
I get to watch one episode of T.V. and day.
Q:  What tips do you have for people working at multiple campuses?
A:  You have to figure out how to be organized.
I have a box the care for each campus.
Color coded folders are really useful.
Sticking to a plan.
I post my calendars online.
Being really regular in terms of grading has been a savior for me.
I remember I graded 2 sets of papers in one night and then taught a 9:45 am class and I thought, no one should live this way.
I always know what I am doing in each class at the beginning of each semester.
The night before I always get the reading done again.
We are seeing that being predictable is important helps to minimize student stress.
In the classroom, they always know what’s going to happen.
I am actually caring about how they are doing.
You feel like something that is used and thrown away at the end of the semester. Or paid to go away.
I feel very strongly that I was born to teach.
The most happy comfortable place for me is in front of a classroom.
If I don’t get a full time job, I will consider looking into other professions.
I feel like I am one of the best!
Every year that I don’t pick up a full time job, it’s lost income.
I love being a teacher.
I want a full time job.
I want an institution to commit to me and I want to commit myself.
In one place where I teach, I am not even given a library card.

We recorded this podcast on October 11, 2013

 Email for Dr. Melissa Knoll:  mgarcia.knoll@gmail.com

Why Your Opinion Matters: 

Our upcoming book:The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching, was written with feedback from many educators and students, which was our plan all along. We began by outlining our thoughts on a series of topics, then we recorded them to share with the world. From the feedback we received, we were informed about the needs of the student caring community. We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

Born_To_Teach

 

 

Direct download: sc_56.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 2:36pm PST
Comments[0]

SC 55 The Life of an Adjunct Professor

Adjunct Professor, Jason Witt  |  Student Caring

Daniel and David interview Adjunct Professor, Jason Witt.

Sound Bites from the Podcast:

I typically teach at three colleges a semester.

Each semester my load is usually about seven classes. I teach every single day and teach two night classes per week. I am in my 14th year of teaching this schedule.

Q: In a typical semester how many essays do you grade?
A: 1,000.

We have to grade whenever we have a scrap of time.

  • We are grading during office hours.
  • We are grading in between classes.
  • When we come home from work, we are grading.
  • On the weekends, you are grading, pretty much the entire weekend.

For the next four months, this is your life.

The rewards are that you are going to have 6 or 12 weeks and summers off.

What helps you to do your job?

  • You have to be an extremely good organizer. (I color code everything.)
  • You are going to have to prepare early for the week.
  • Organization is a big, big, thing.
  • Focus. I am one of those people who can put myself in 'grading mode' for hours.
  • I can sit on the couch, for hours and hours and just grade.

For me, I grade papers on hard copy instead of digitally. I am carrying these papers around with me wherever I go.

We have to take on more classes to make ends meet.

The best way for a student to communicate with me is in person. I am perfectly willing to meet with them, out on a bench or wherever.

Q: What are you like at the end of the semester?

A: After I have finished grading all of those papers, I sit and watch T.V. for one week because I don't want my brain to do any work. Here's the thing, after two or three weeks, I am ready to get back into the classroom.

There's something about this job... We all know it's certainly not the money.
Could things be better? Yes.

This is a challenging job, but there are ways of making it work.

There are changes that definitely need to be made.

  • There needs to be more money.
  • There needs to be more full time jobs.

I have to teach so much so I can make a living. It is a challenge.

Daniel:  One of the things we wanted to do is attach a voice to the adjunct professor. Thank you Jason.

 

We recorded this podcast on October 11, 2013

 Email for Prof. Jason Witt:  jwitt@ivc.edu

Why Your Opinion Matters: 

Our upcoming book:The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching, was written with feedback from many educators and students, which was our plan all along. We began by outlining our thoughts on a series of topics, then we recorded them to share with the world. From the feedback we received, we were informed about the needs of the student caring community. We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

The Life of an Adjunct Professor  |  Student Caring

"I teach 7 classes at 3 colleges and grade

1,000 essays  semester. I have been doing this

for the past 14 years." Prof. Jason Witt

 

Direct download: sc_55.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:29pm PST
Comments[0]

Listen.Taking Time to Listen.  |  Student Caring

Daniel and David discuss the importance of taking time to listen to our students.

Sound Bites from the Podcast:

We are really busy as we approach the middle of our semesters.

Thank you to everyone who responded to our last podcast: The Travails of Part Time Teachers. We have more information upcoming on this serious problem.

Practicing what I preach.

True confession time from Daniel.

The student just really wasn't interested in class at all.

I stopped class and called him on his behavior.

When we get busy, we tend to misinterpret our students behavior.

My student began classes at 7:00 am that morning and my class was at 4:00 pm. After my class he had to go to work.

We are television to our students and unfortunately the only thing on is PBS!

We sometimes forget about the people who are in front of this.

THREE PRINCIPLES OF STUDENT CARING IN THE MIDDLE OF THE TERM

  1. Step back and take time to listen to your students.
  2. Be aware of your own warning signs, in terms of teaching.
  3. Don't be afraid in the middle of the term to interrupt your schedule and review what has been learned.

  

We recorded this podcast on October 1, 2013

Why Your Opinion Matters: 

Our upcoming book:The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching, was written with feedback from many educators and students, which was our plan all along. We began by outlining our thoughts on a series of topics, then we recorded them to share with the world. From the feedback we received, we were informed about the needs of the student caring community. We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_54.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 5:00am PST
Comments[0]

Higher Ed... We have a problem.Higher Ed… We have a problem. \ Student Caring

This is the beginning of our journey to help all of Higher Ed to solve the problems currently facing part time / adjunct teachers and professors. 

If you are a part time teacher and have something to say on this topic, we would would like to interview you, please write. info@studentcaring.com

Thank you,

Daniel and David

In this podcast we begin to investigate the problems, challenges, and future hopes associated with the travails of part time teachers.

Sound Bits from the Podcast:

Parents are concerned, rightly so, with getting their monies worth. What are you paying for, elaborate commencement ceremonies or the teaching experience.

Are you getting free gifts that you paid for?

There are a lot of problems in how much money is dedicated toward teaching faculty.

The balance of full time to part time faculty is one that is looked at by the financial planners carefully.

Students taking general education courses are likely to be taught be people who are not full time employees of the university. We refer to these people out here (In Southern California) as "Freeway Flyers."

[box] This article may interest you:  Post-Modern Superhero: The Freeway Flyer from AdjunctNation.com[/box]

These folks are often teaching six or seven courses a semester in order to eek out a living.

The quality of instruction is likely, not that of a full time faculty person.

The university budget gets locked in to this type of mode. Over 50% of the classes are usually being taught be adjunct instructors. It is difficult for them to transition the instructors into full time jobs.

What we are interested in is the effect on students in the classroom.

What about the quality of life and rest of life issues if any, for the part time teacher?

What does this due for first and second year college students?

I overheard a student say, "Oh, we have a real professor." So, there is a perception of quality of teaching associated with titles. This is a problem.

Does an Assistant Professor mean that you are assisting a Professor? No, not at all!

This is a plague on our society where people are coming out of school and working part time without any guarantee of employment.

What are the long term effects of these part time teachers?

What are the effects on our students?

What would our colleges and universities look like if there were more full time faculty and less adjuncts so that the ratio was 90% - 10% rather than 60% to 40%?

We want to hear from adjunct professors so we can further the body of knowledge on this topic and help all of higher education to a solution. Join our community by dropping us an email and let us know your thoughts. info@studentcaring.com

We are pretty upset about this and want to fix it.

We recorded this podcast on September 18, 2013.

Facts from the Info-Graphic below:

  • How our best and brightest can work tirelessly for 8 years only to receive food stamps, debt, and no career.
  • Tenure Track Professor, $120,000. vs Adjunct, $20,000.
  • There are 5.7 Million more college students than there were 10 years ago, a 45% increase in full time students, while tenure track positions have only increased 28% in 32 years. (From 1975-2007).
[box] Don't miss our  upcoming episode: "The travels and travails of part time instructors."[/box]
Why Your Opinion Matters: 

Our upcoming book:The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching, was written with feedback from many educators and students, which was our plan all along. We began by outlining our thoughts on a series of topics, then we recorded them to share with the world. From the feedback we received, we were informed about the needs of the student caring community. We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Higher Ed, We have a problem.  |  Student Caring

 

 

 

 

 

Direct download: sc_53.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 6:00pm PST
Comments[0]

Student Anxiety in the Classroom

 

NEWS: If you are faculty or administration at a college in search of guest speakers or are planning a faculty development program, we are currently booking for January, 2014. Email: info@studentcaring.com.

In this podcast we are honored to interview Dr. Melissa Birkett from Northern Arizona University.

  • PhD Neuroscience and Behavior, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2007
  • Dr. Melissa Birkett - Student CaringMEd Secondary Education, Biology, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2005
  • BA Psychology, Concentration in Biopsychology, Cornell University, 2001

SOUND BITES FROM THE PODCAST

Daniel: Melissa, What prompted you to study and write about “Student Anxiety”?

Melissa: Quite frankly, I saw it in my classes. My student said, "Yes, we are nervous about the content." This was something I experienced myself as a student.  It became really clear that anxiety towards subject in higher education leads to some negative outcomes including poor course performance.

David: What can we as professors do to help students with stress?

Melissa:

  1. Be predicable.
  2. Provide opportunities for student control.
  3. Trust students.

The first two can go a long way to helping students.

Be predicable:

  • Sharing your expectations with students.
  • Sharing the course format up front.

Provide opportunities for student control:

  • Think about ways in which the student can contribute to ways in which the course is going.
  • Giving some flexibility about due dates.

We can really reduce the anxiety of students not knowing what you expect.

Melissa: We know what we are thinking all the time and students may not.

Daniel: Our worlds are structured and predicable and for them, every things always brand new.

ABOUT TRUSTING STUDENTS

Melissa: Trusting that students will make good decisions and do their work is really valuable.

When students come to your office, make them feel welcome. It is a big deal for a student to come to your office, that's "Teachers Turf."

Daniel: What can student do to manage their own stress?

Melissa: Maintaining a healthy life style. Form mentoring relationships with people on campus.

ABOUT STRESS AND THE IMUNE SYSTEM

  • When are you most likely to get sick? Finals week!
  • Self care is really important.

Melissa: As educators, if we have any opportunity to become as student again, I think that's really valuable. That's reminds of what it is like to be a student.

Dr. Birkett - Email: Melissa.Birkett@nau.edu

Student Anxiety in the Classroom by Dr. Melissa Birkett (pdf download)

[box]“I dreaded being in an undergraduate class from the first day, but you made me feel welcome”[/box]

“I tried my best to avoid taking this class by substituting [other] classes but it was "no go." I even almost dropped the class on a couple of occasions but was dissuaded and encouraged [by] you to stay the course. I'm very glad that I did, because, I now realize how important this subject matter is to having a complete understanding of the issues ... and will take [more classes] in my last semester”

Knowing that the majority of classes I teach come with a reputation for including difficult topics (neuroscience and psychopharmacology) and are replete with student anxiety about the subject matter, makes receiving student comments like these all the more meaningful. Content-related apprehension often appears as a common theme when I ask students about their expectations at the beginning of a course (e.g., the word “dread” frequently appears). I strive to address and allay fears about what will happen in our classes together and am gratified and humbled when I am successful and receive comments such as the ones above.

As a step to better understand student anxiety in my classes, I sought to document the prevalence of content-related anxiety in some of my classes. By the end of the semester, I recorded significant reductions in anxiety. Although this line of research has yet to examine the value of specific practices or interventions, I have shared the results of the research many times with students in the context of recognizing that they may feel this way about a class, sharing with them that many other students do too, and pointing out that they might not always feel this way.

From research literature in neuroscience, it is clear that stress and anxiety inhibit learning through powerful brain mechanisms. The stress response is adaptive for escaping a dangerous, unsafe or threatening situation, but it impairs new learning about subjects that are somewhat less germane to immediate survival, like balancing a chemical equation or learning a foreign language. By caring about students, and doing our best to reduce their anxiety in our classrooms, we help students utilize brain processes that contribute to learning. Among our younger students, there is growing evidence that the adolescent brain is particularly sensitive to the effects of stress. Whenever we can structure our learning environments and lessons to prevent or reduce anxiety, we do our part to improve student learning. As caring professors, what can we do to reduce anxiety in our classrooms and help our students learn and succeed?

Below are a few ideas culled from the research literature in both neuroscience and best practices in higher education.

1. Be predicable. Numerous studies have demonstrated the anxiety-provoking nature of unpredictable stressors. Being predictable doesn’t have to mean giving up flexibility or spontaneity in a course, but it can mean making your expectations explicit (for example, specifying the format of a research paper, but not necessarily the topic). Providing a clear, detailed and explicit syllabus at the beginning of a course, with assignments described, due dates listed, policies for using technology or submitting late assignments outlined, or your philosophy and expectations included can go a long way toward reducing stressful unpredictability. This can be particularly important at the beginning of a course when student anxieties about an unpredictable course are on the rise.
2. Provide opportunities for student control. In neuroscience and stress research, if unpredictability is the first ingredient for creating anxiety, lack of control is the second. Control, or even perceived control, of a situation is capable of reducing the physical and psychological reactions to stress. Giving students opportunities to control some aspects of their experience in our classes can be an effective way to reduce anxiety. This might range from flexible due dates or late assignment policies to allowing students to select their own topics for a research project, to using a class poll to determine the next topic in class, to fully student-led projects or lessons.
3. Trust students. In his collection of best practices, Ken Bain distills a range of qualitative information about how the most successful teachers treat their students into one theme; trust. Bain describes the story of a student with severe test anxiety who achieved a high final exam grade, and more importantly, demonstrated his understanding through a spontaneous but detailed oral exam, influenced by his professor’s trust in his knowledge. Bain writes “trust and openness produced an interactive atmosphere in which students could ask questions without reproach or embarrassment” and cites a source who describes his approach as trying “to make students feel relaxed and challenged, but always comfortable enough to challenge me and each other” (p. 142). How can we demonstrate trust to create a supportive environment, minimizing anxiety? Bain suggests sharing a sense of humility with students, occasionally sharing paths in our own learning, expressing our own sense of awe and curiosity about learning, and setting an intention to share a classroom with students as fellow learners.

Each of these elements can help convey student caring. Each can be considered a characteristic of a classroom environment designed to reduce student anxiety, but a thoughtful and intentional combination of these aspects is required to be successful. With an ever-growing resource base in the scholarship of teaching and learning, new ideas about digital, hybrid and flipped classrooms, and a new generation of educators entering academia, ideas for reducing student anxiety are growing. What strategies have you used to promote student caring and reduce anxiety in your classrooms?

References

Bain, K. (2004). What the best college teachers do. Harvard University Press.

Birkett, M.A., Shelton K. (2011). Participating in an introductory neuroscience course decreases neuroscience anxiety. Journal of Undergraduate Neuroscience Education, 10(1), A37-A43.

Melissa Birkett is an Associate Professor in the Psychology Department at Northern Arizona University.

 Student Anxiety - Student Caring

 

 

 

[box] Don't miss our  upcoming episode: "The travels and travails of part time instructors."[/box]
 
Why Your Opinion Matters: 

Our upcoming book:The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching, was written with feedback from many educators and students, which was our plan all along. We began by outlining our thoughts on a series of topics, then we recorded them to share with the world. From the feedback we received, we were informed about the needs of the student caring community. We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_52.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:30am PST
Comments[0]

Caring for Students in our Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Mr. Richard Gibson Jr.
Mr. Richard Gibson Jr.


Thank you to everyone in the Student Caring Community who have been following,
contributing and sharing our work all over the world!

In this podcast we are honored to interview Mr. Richard Gibson Jr. 

  • His is: An alumnus of Florida A & M University
  • An entrepreneur in on-line business, wholesale apparel and catering.
  • Co-Founder (With his son, Garrick) of “The HBCU Lifestyle Blog” (An exceptional resource for college students.)

STUDENT CARING: The family-run web site was inspired by sending their son & grandson to college. Their intent is to bring students, alumni, and the community together in preserving the HBCU tradition.

Richard, we are honored to speak with you today, thank you for joining us. To begin, here is a quote from your website:
H.B.C.U. || Student Caring

RICHARD: Yes, indeed. It is a quote from Oprah Winfrey's speech to the graduating class of Spelman College last year.

[embedplusvideo height="392" width="480" editlink="http://bit.ly/14vmFEv" standard="http://www.youtube.com/v/Bpx8uNzRdew?fs=1&hd=1" vars="ytid=Bpx8uNzRdew&width=480&height=392&start=&stop=&rs=w&hd=1&autoplay=0&react=1&chapters=&notes=" id="ep6525" /]

We are part of a generation that has benefited from the inspiration that our fore-parents have given us.
In this day's generation, it's easy to forget from whence you came.

Dr. Ysaye M. Barnwell

Song Lyrics for "We Are"
From Lessons by Y.M. Barnwell ©1993

For each child that's born
a morning star rises
and sings to the universe
who we are.

We are our grandmothers' prayers.
We are our grandfathers' dreamings.
We are the breath of our ancestors.
We are the spirit of God.

We are
Mothers of courage
Fathers of time
Daughters of dust
Sons of great vision.
We are
Sisters of mercy
Brothers of love
Lovers of life and
the builders of nations.
We are
Seekers of truth
Keepers of faith
Makers of peace and
the wisdom of ages.

We are our grandmothers' prayers.
We are our grandfathers' dreamings.
We are the breath of our ancestors.
We are the spirit of God.

For each child that's born
a morning star rises
and sings to the universe
who we are.

WE ARE ONE.

STUDENT CARING: What were the challenges for HBCU students in the past and what are they today?
RICHARD: I get to see kids before they go off to college and I can tell you that:
  • Unfortunately a lot of our people are not prepared, fully to go to college. The preparation is not as strong as it was back-in-the-day when I was there where our teachers exhorted us. They really pushed the whole piece of our getting an education. They are not prepared to take on the riggers of a college life.
  • The second challenge is financing a college education. A large number of students at the HBCU's are dependent on the PELL GRANT. This is unfortunate, because many of them are struggling financially to just "Stay in College."
  • The third challenge is to find a job once they graduate.

Our teachers were much more rigorous in making sure we were prepared to go to college. You see a different attitude about education today from back then, so consequently, the drive, the love, is not as strong as back in the day that I came from.

In the late 60's we were in the middle of the revolution. Those things propelled us to think about what we were doing. Our teachers were more focused on getting us the best education. Those teachers were dedicated!

STUDENT CARING:  What can we as professors, do to help today's students?

RICHARD:  I think the best thing you can do is re-connect the students with today's world. I find that a lot of students are more concerned with "stuff." Students are disconnected from the world of reality. The first five minutes of each class, the professors might just talk an issue that is going on in the world. Connect them.

STUDENT CARING: A former student told me: "I am amazed at how many movies my fellow students can watch in a semester."

RICHARD: There has to be a sense of purpose and drive.

STUDENT CARING: Is there anything else you would like to share with the Student Caring Community?

RICHARD: We need young people to become involved with mental health issues. We want them to be involved in the world, not just social media. I hope that you, through your website, and similar kinds of media, you can inspire young people to get involved and stay involved to make meaningful changes in this world. So that you can look back and say "Gee, we made an important historic mark on the world, we really made a difference."

hbcu-lifestyle-logo-350x270

This episode was recorded on Wednesday, August 21, 2013.

 

Student Caring on Stitcher Radio
Student Caring on Stitcher Radio
Why Your Opinion Matters: 

Our upcoming book:The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching, was written with feedback from many educators and students, which was our plan all along. We began by outlining our thoughts on a series of topics, then we recorded them to share with the world. From the feedback we received, we were informed about the needs of the student caring community. We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_51.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 4:49pm PST
Comments[0]

Transitioning from Undergraduate to Graduate School Transitioning from Undergrad. to Grad.

In celebration of our 50th PODCAST!  we interview two students who making the transition from undergraduate to graduate school.

The students are Mr. Jonathan de Roulet (Daniel's son and David's former student) and his girlfriend, Ms. Carlene DeScalo.

Here are some additional interviews with students and one for graduate students:

Thank you to everyone in the Student Caring Community who have been following, contributing and sharing our work with the world!

We  begin with a short story from Jonathan about the Student Caring Project began then discuss their journey's from undergraduate to graduate school.

Sound Bites:

  • Jonathan, please tell our audience the story about how "Student Caring" began...
  • There was this class, "Career Directions and Your Daily Bread"...
  • What can you tell us about your journey from undergraduate to graduate school?
  • Once you graduate, you learn a significant amount about what you want to do and what you don't want to do.
  • We went to U/RTA's in Chicago.
  • Q: What has been the best experience for preparing you for a graduate program?
  • A: Being at the Steppenwolf Theatre Company.
  • Q: What do you want to get out of graduate school? A: More professional connections and to give other undergraduates hope.
  • Carlene: "Ultimately, I want to teach."
  • Jonathan: "The one are going to, California State University at Long Beach, just felt the most at home and the most that they cared about their students growth and progress."
  • We accept constructive criticism, but when it's just criticism for the sake of criticism, a student's not going to very open to that.
  • We rated schools, strictly on the merits of the person who interviewed me.
  • I think we should go our separate ways.
  • Q: What about Long Beach (State University) is attractive to you? A: Well, it's a beach town.
  • Q: Why are you going to graduate school for the arts? A: In order to get the higher level jobs, I need to put in the time to get an M.F.A.
  • Q: Why are you going to graduate school for the arts? A: If you want to teach, you need an M.F.A. or five years in the field. The opportunities are much much better.
  • Carelene and I are used to working 60 hour weeks in theatre. We imagine grad school will be quite similar.
  • The first year is designed to be challenging and to weed out people who are not meant to be in grad school.
  • Q: Do you have any advice to give other undergraduate students? A: Never underestimate the value of an undergraduate school or a degree in theatre.
  • Q: Do you have any advice to give other undergraduate students? A: Just because you lose on job, it does not mean its over for you.
  • Other jobs we all have worked: Kentucky Fried ChickenJack in the BoxStarbucksBarnes and NobleBurlesquePapa JohnsJimmy Jon's.

Please join us for podcast No. 51:  “Caring for Students in our Historically Black Colleges and Universities”

50 Podcasts! // Student Caring
Today we celebrate with podcast No. 50!

 

Student Caring on Stitcher Radio
Student Caring on Stitcher Radio
Why Your Opinion Matters: 

Our upcoming book:The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching, was written with feedback from many educators and students, which was our plan all along. We began by outlining our thoughts on a series of topics, then we recorded them to share with the world. From the feedback we received, we were informed about the needs of the student caring community. We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_50.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 6:00am PST
Comments[0]

Helping E.S.L. (English as a Second Language) Students Succeed / Part Two of Two

As the 2013 fall term begins we wanted to feature these prior episodes with you.

Helping E.S.L. Students Succeed

In this podcast we continue our interview with Professors Jeff Wilson and Rebecca Beck, E.S.L. specialists from Irvine Valley College, California.

English as a Second Language Sound Bites from the Podcast:

  • Culturally, students are not comfortable with speaking with a professor.
  • To many students professors are the "Sage on the stage."
  • In some cultures women are seen as the weaker element and they will not ask a female professor any question.
  • Not all students know what an "office hour" is. They might think it is the time when you have lunch.
  • I require all students to come to visit me during an officer hour.
  • We tend to lump populations together. We need to look at students as individuals, they are all different, they come from different backgrounds.
  • I have mid term evaluations with each student individually. It is appropriate to do this during a regular class time. Those 10 - 15 minutes with students may have a greater impact than in an lecture.
  • You have an amazing opportunity (as a Professor) to keep learning when you meet with a student individually.
  • I do believe that students avoid E.S.L. programs, one reason is they feel stigmatized.
  • We need to communicate with E.S.L. students that an E.S.L. class will help them with their college careers.
  • University departments need to work together to help E.S.L. students. This is a campus culture issue.
  • I hear E.S.L. Students often say, "I fear it is going to me an awfully long time to graduate."
  • "I don't want to be behind my friends and have to take college for 7 years.
  • Language is not a discipline, language is a human trait, it takes time.
  • Acquiring academic english takes five to 10 years.
  • Acquiring a second language is really intimate.
  • Acquiring english is like learning to play soccer. This can be hard in a world of instant gratification.
  • Q:  What can E.S.L. students to outside of the classroom?
    • A:  The number one thing is get a new girlfriend or boyfriend. (English speaking)
    • A:  Engage in the english speaking world outside of the classroom.
    • A:  Find some sort of hobby or interest that they like.
    • A:  Encourage them to engage in sports.
  • Some universities are forgetting that some future students are in countries where they don't have the Internet yet.
  • We, as professors, need to have a taller understanding of where E.S.L. students are coming from.
  • These students are to not remedial, they are critical thinkers.
  • We sometimes forgive when a student speaks in an accent. When we read papers, sometimes we forget that they are also writing with an accent.
  • The linguistic ability of the person has nothing to do with their cognitive ability.

 

Contact Information:  Email:  Prof. Rebecca Beck   |   Prof. Jeff  Wilson

Irvine Valley College | Student Caring
For additional reading and resources on this topic, click into the Faculty Lounge for the ESL RESOURCE CENTER.
Faculty ESL Resources
Faculty ESL Resources

 

[box] Don't miss our very special (50th!) upcoming podcast: Transitioning from Undergraduate to Gradate School[/box]
Student Caring on Stitcher Radio
Student Caring on Stitcher Radio
Why Your Opinion Matters: 

Our upcoming book:The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching, was written with feedback from many educators and students, which was our plan all along. We began by outlining our thoughts on a series of topics, then we recorded them to share with the world. From the feedback we received, we were informed about the needs of the student caring community. We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_49.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 1:30pm PST
Comments[0]

Helping E.S.L. (English as a Second Language) Students Succeed / Part One of Two

As we prepare to begin the 2013 fall term we wanted to feature some previous podcasts, fitting for this time of year.

Helping E.S.L. Students Succeed
Helping E.S.L. Students Succeed

In this podcast we interview Professors Jeff Wilson and Rebecca Beck, E.S.L. specialists from Irvine Valley College, California.

Sound Bites:

  • Students may not know who Seinfeld is or even what a sitcom is.
  • Giving the student the context of the situation helps.
  • Language is culture and culture is language.
  • Student anxiety can come from the power relationship between the student and the professor.
  • How do we know when students are engaged?
  • There is not a 'generic' E.S.L. student.
  • Understanding the different needs of your students is at the root of good instruction.
  • Using blogs and journals can help us to understand our students.
  • Part of my mission as a teacher is also to help my native speaking students understand what it is like for my E.S.L. students.
  • Would you text your friend, "I am gonna B L 8?" Of course not!
  • We are all together in this and we are going to move forward.
  • "Who are the Beatles?"
  • I cannot call you "My Student" until I know something about you. I do a survey to help to get the know the student. What are your goals for this class?
  • You recognize them (Your students) as a person, not just a seat warmer in the class.
  • I don't believe that they are just my students, they are also a son, daughter, and neighbor.
  • The longer we teach, if we keep using the same answers over and over, we are going to marginalize ourselves from popular culture.
  • Every class I teach, I have the class do a group project of some sort.
  • I as a teacher am constantly learning from my students.
  • I take the time outside of class to look on YouTube and other cultural references to get to know them. It is my own homework assignment.
  • I need to stay plugged in myself so I can remain relevant to my students.

Our next podcast, No. 49 will be part 2 on this topic, please join us!
Don't miss our very special celebratory podcast, No. 50.

 

Contact Information: 

Email:  Prof. Rebecca Beck   |   Prof. Jeff  Wilson

Irvine Valley College | Student Caring
Why Your Opinion Matters: 

Our upcoming book:The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching, was written with feedback from many educators and students, which was our plan all along. We began by outlining our thoughts on a series of topics, then we recorded them to share with the world. From the feedback we received, we were informed about the needs of the student caring community. We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_48.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 6:00pm PST
Comments[0]

How We Spent Our Summer Vacation

How We Spent Our Summer

In this podcast we talk about our activities during the summer of 2013 and give you a preview of what to expect from Student Caring in the fall.

Sound Bites:

  • I taught the typical college composition class.
  • I produced a theatre production and in doing so, re-designed how I will teach my course in producing for next spring.
  • Any fun this summer, David? With a student of mine, we helped to put on a local fireworks show.
  • We would like to hear from you about future topics for us to research and present.
  • If you are a student, we would love to have you as a guest for a podcast interview.
  • We have listeners who are in India, England, and Australia. If you are in one of these countries, we would like to make personal contact to get to know you better. Please, introduce yourself!
  • If you have an educational conference in your area, we would love to join you as guest speakers.
  • We hope you are all having wonderful summers!

Upcoming Podcast Topics:

  • Professor, Ellen Bremen, M.A. will join us for a podcast and talk about her new book, "Say This, NOT That to Your Professor. 36 Talking Tips for College Success
  • E.S.L. programs and their importance.
  • International students in the Unites States.
  • H.B.C.U. Lifestyle

 

Why Your Opinion Matters: 

Our upcoming book:The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching, was written with feedback from many educators and students, which was our plan all along. We began by outlining our thoughts on a series of topics, then we recorded them to share with the world. From the feedback we received, we were informed about the needs of the student caring community. We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_47_our_summer.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:08am PST
Comments[0]

NOW WHAT?! 

Student Caring Interviews Ari King
Student Caring Interviews Ari King

In this podcast, Student Caring's Daniel and David interview Ari King about his new book, NOW WHAT?! - Conversations about College Graduation and the Next Step.

College acts as a giant umbrella when you transition from high school. There are majors to declare, dorms to live in, and peers to bond with. Not only can you can rely on older students, family members, and the college’s staff to assist you, guide you, and answer questions, but all of the options are pre- sented to you. However, when you graduate from college, there is little to no structure about what comes next. So what are you supposed to do?

BOOK DESCRIPTION FROM AMAZON:
Now What?! Conversations about College, Graduation, and the Next Step features over sixty interviews with college graduates about their experiences transitioning from college students to recent graduates looking for work, applying for graduate school, and trying to figure out what to do next. From the budding marine biologist who studied abroad in Saint Croix to the driven journalist who graduated early for a newspaper job, Now What?! is packed full of advice for students and alumni alike. Now What?! features interviews with a writer and former pro basketball player who found himself on academic probation twice, a C-suite executive who contemplated ballet or TV reporting, a university president who never left school, a producer for Modern Family and Will & Grace, a systems engineer for the U.S. Navy with dreams of teaching kindergarten, a job-hopping competitive rower who won gold at the 1984 Olympics, and more!

DANIEL: Today, we welcome a man who was one of the first to become a member of the Student Caring community. In March of 2012 we published an interview with Ari: Listener Ari King: The College Graduates Handbook.

Our Questions for Mr. Ari King:

  • One of the things that our project has been concerned about that you really tackle in Now What?! is the overemphasis on getting to college but not on what to do when you graduate.  What do you see as the sources of the problem of overemphasizing admission to college, and what can we as a society do about it?
  • In the interviews you conducted, where did professors play a positive role in preparing their students what comes after college?  If you were a prof today, what would you do to make a difference for your students in this area?
  • You have divided your interview into four categories of people:  "know-it-alls," "roundabouts," "no-ideas," and "pathswitchers."  Could you describe the characteristics of each group just a little?  Into which category would you put yourself?
  • You interview a lot of successful people in your book who have obtained success in very different ways.  Which of the paths you encountered are of the most interest to you?
  • Tell us just a little about the experience of writing this book.  How much work was involved on both the writing and publishing ends?

Sound Bites:

  • When I graduated, I realized that there was not a blueprint to life in post-college, like there was for getting into college.
  • It would be beneficial, for the professor if there could be a little bit more than just information giving.
  • I am a professor and I also a human being on the side. My door is always open.
  • Just as my mom said, "You just put one foot in front of the other and it will get figured out."
  • If you are still in college, you should be proud and happy about that.

 

Now What?!
Ari King
Ari King
Why Your Opinion Matters: 

Our upcoming book:The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching, was written with feedback from many educators and students, which was our plan all along. We began by outlining our thoughts on a series of topics, then we recorded them to share with the world. From the feedback we received, we were informed about the needs of the student caring community. We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: sc_46_ari_king.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:30am PST
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Caring Online - Student Caring
The Online Challenge? 
Caring in a Different Kind of Presence

Caring Online

The Online Challenge? Caring in a Different Kind of Presence.

"We worry about a loss of physical presence and all that goes with it."

How "Student Caring" can help with online education (Courses which are 100% online).

Our Concerns:

  • Online education is education-light—there is little way of controlling or determining the quality of the instruction and learning.
  • For those concerned about the student side of the equation—whether students are doing enough work to earn the credit—this aspect of learning is still controlled by the instructor and her or his department.
  • How do I know that the person doing the work is the student—not a parent, a significant other, or a paid “for-hire” student?
  • Aren’t online classes an excellent place to hide for students uncomfortable with the course’s primary language, or the subject matter, or the physical classroom? Yes and no…and for bad and good.

How can a "Student Caring" approach affect an online class?

  • Put ground rules and expectations in place and up front. This is an act of caring.
  • Use discussion boards to build community.

We explore this topic more fully in our upcoming book: The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching.

Sound Bites:

  • Parents are hiring, "Students for hire," to take college courses online for their son or daughter.
  • I have one student who spends 30 hours of work on her essays.
  • The online class environment can relieve anxiety for E.S.L. (English as a Second Language) students.
  • Online classes seem to attract folks who tend to motivate themselves.
  • When you are taking an online class, dress like you are going to an in person class.
  • We don't want merely teach like "Chalk and Talk" in a digital environment.
  • Make sure that there are opportunities to put in a little entertainment into your lectures.
  • Get involved with those discussion groups.
  • I am seeing people who are disconnecting from Facebook.
  • Think of your online class as an opportunity for personal connection.

Professors, who are often are seen by students as role models, are also models of adult thinking.

 

Items Mentioned in this Episode:
Why Your Opinion Matters:

Our upcoming book:The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching, was written with feedback from many educators and students, which was our plan all along. We began by outlining our thoughts on a series of topics, then we recorded them to share with the world. From the feedback we received, we were informed about the needs of the student caring community. We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: pod_45.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 5:00pm PST
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In this podcast we offer 22 examples of how college is different from high school along with some tips about each.

Different small 291x300

How College is different from High School

  1. You will be the youngest and not the oldest.
  2. You may have older students in your classes who are returning to college.
  3. Your fellow students will come from a much larger geographic area.
  4. Nothing happens automatically.
  5. You must initiate.
  6. You won't hear bells at the conclusion of each class.
  7. You must manage your own time.
  8. It will appear that you have more free time.
  9. You may be living in a dorm instead of at home.
  10. You college may be in a location new to you.
  11. Different climate.
  12. Different food.
  13. Different Air!
  14. Lunch will have more options, alcohol may be served, and coffee will become an important part of your life.
  15. The class sizes may be larger - much larger.
  16. Bells will not ring at the end of each class period.
  17. You wont' say the pledge of allegiance.
  18. There will no "announcements" over a PA system.
  19. The teacher will likely be a professor, teachers assistant or graduate student.
  20. It is assumed that you will be responsible for your own grades and deadlines.
  21. The professors will not check with each other to compare notes on how you are doing.
  22. Academic requirements will be new and at a higher level.
Why Your Opinion Matters:

Our upcoming book:The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching, was written with feedback from many educators and students, which was our plan all along. We began by outlining our thoughts on a series of topics, then we recorded them to share with the world. From the feedback we received, we were informed about the needs of the student caring community. We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: pod_44.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 4:07pm PST
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Negotiating With Our Students | The Student Caring Project
Four strategies to help with this topic

In this podcast we discuss strategies to manage the issue of grade negotiations.
(By the way, this is a preview from our upcoming book.)

 

Four strategies to help with this topic.

  1. An executive summary of the syllabus explains the rules of engagement.
  2. Keeping grades up to date removes opportunities for negotiation.
  3. Written reflections on grades create a paper trail.
  4. Pre-Final examination grade projections and rules limit the scope of negotiations.

Sound Bites:

  • How many other professors have has this student had this conversation with?
  • We come from a culture of negotiation.
  • My parents negotiate, isn't that the was it is done?
  • I can not imagine having that conversation with a professor.
  • How can professors minimize this type of situation at the end of a term?
  • Engaging in negotiation, obviously sends the wrong message to students.
Why Your Opinion Matters:

Our upcoming book:The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching, was written with feedback from many educators and students, which was our plan all along. We began by outlining our thoughts on a series of topics, then we recorded them to share with the world. From the feedback we received, we were informed about the needs of the student caring community. We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Thank you!

Daniel & David

Direct download: pod_43.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:30am PST
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We welcome back special guest, Professor Summer Serpas, who teaches English at Irvine Valley College in Orange 2 uneder smallCounty, California. Prof. Serpas is a member of the California Acceleration Project, which works with underprepared college students.

Part Two of Two

In this episode you’ll learn about:

  • Fiction: Underprepared students need hand holding.
    • I would argue against the idea that we are not supposed to hand hold at all.
    • We are also teaching students how "to do" college.
    • We are working to build autonomy in our work over the semester
    • I structure the grading so that the grading does not count so much in the beginning.
    • In class, I really do almost no lecture. Students are in small groups, whole class discussions, and activities - so I can move through the class one on one.
    • Students say, "We want to work on this over the weekend".
  • How do you work with students one on one during class?
    • I circulate around the room when they are working on a group activity.
    • While they are doing activities, I pull them up one by one and have a mini five-minute conference
    • Students will often stay after class for one on one instruction.
    • It's not "lecture" it's more helping them out.
  • Fiction: At-risk students are often at risk because problems with English as a Second Language.
    • I personally would never categorize an E.S.L. student as an at-risk student unless he or she were making the choice to move out of an that E.S.L sequence before making native level proficiency.
    • Sometimes it's fear based. 
    • The more we can work with our E.S.L Department, the more it will help. 
  • Fiction: Accelerated programs are really meant for intellectually gifted students--certainly not for at-risk students.
    • I think our gut instinct is to slow down when students are struggling and to take it step by step. 
    • My student stated that they were placed at the bottom of the pit.
    • Getting only 30% of students through to the college level writing class is not okay.
    • If we accelerate, we have to also then change our way of teaching. We have to follow that backwards design, we have to provide just in time remediation, and most important, we have to address those effective issues that are causing students to fail. If we do that together then I think that acceleration can work.
    • If we can change our approach  to teaching, and really teaching in a way that will allow them to get where they want to be.
  • Do you have anything additional that you would like to share with our community?
    • I think it is important as instructors that we are always growing and changing.
    • This has really challenged me to have that "growth mindset" that I was speaking about for my students in my own teaching and being willing to grow as a teacher and change what I am doing and change my approach.
    • What I like about this approach is that it is very respectful to students.
    • To students: You can do this work and I can help you do this work".
    • I feel better connected to my students.

Items mentioned in this podcast include:

Why Your Opinion Matters:

Our upcoming book:The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching, was written with feedback from many educators and students, which was our plan all along. We began by outlining our thoughts on a series of topics, then we recorded them to share with the world. From the feedback we received, we were informed about the needs of the student caring community. We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

 

CompletionInitiative
Direct download: pod_42.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 10:30am PST
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Under 1 blogWe welcome special guest, Professor Summer Serpas, who teaches English at Irvine Valley College in Orange County, California. Prof. Serpas is a member of the California Acceleration Project, which works with underprepared college students.

Part One of Two

In this episode you’ll learn about:

  • Fiction: Underprepared students are intellectually unprepared for college.
    • This is a common myth that many people believe in.
    • Students often procrastinate so they can blame the 'procrastination' instead of themselves.
    • The "Fess Up" list. Who did not do the reading today? "I really did the reading, but I did not get it."
  • Fiction: Underprepared students cannot initially take on the same challenging intellectual work expected of their peers.
    • 3 principles of teaching: backwards design, just-in-time remediation, intentional support for issues (such as fear).
    • I practice intrusive interventions for struggling students. 
    • You can raise that academic bar and students can complete that challenging work that we think they might not be ready for.
  • Fiction: Underprepared students do not succeed as well as their peers in college--success stories are the exception rather than the rule.
    • I think they don't succeed due to the structure of our system. Every "Exit Point" that we add, is a point where a student can slip out of the system. What we are doing is eliminating exit points. You can’t just do this, you have to teach differently as well.
 

Items mentioned in this podcast include:

Why Your Opinion Matters:

Our upcoming book:The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching, was written with feedback from many educators and students, which was our plan all along. We began by outlining our thoughts on a series of topics, then we recorded them to share with the world. From the feedback we received, we were informed about the needs of the student caring community. We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

CompletionInitiative
 
 
Direct download: pod_41.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 9:08pm PST
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SC 40 The First Year of College and Your Family

The First Year of College and Your Family

In this podcast, we offer advice for college bound students and their parents about the transition which occurs between  high school and college.

  • Negotiating your relationship with your parents.
  • Staying in touch with siblings.
  • Working to discover the right balance.
 Sound Bites:
• What happens between high school and college is a big change.• You are now a "College Man or "College Woman"

• What is it like having a college student at home or away in a dorm?

•  Parents, this can be a time of "fear."

•  College changes everything!

•  We recommend a genuine heart - to - heart family meeting.Students, give your parents a good idea of the work load that you have - yes, show them your syllabi.

•  Students, before, during and after college, you are still that family member.

•  Students, be sensitive to younger siblings.

•  Ask and answer the question: "Is living away from home a good idea?"

•  Parents, is it best for my student to live away from home?

•  Hear the story: "Where's Farm Boy?"

•  In dorm life, you build a second family.

•  Students:  It's really nice if you don't desert your family during that first year.

Keep in mind, that your goal is to get to that wonderful day of celebration - the commencement ceremony!

We welcome your feedback to this podcast and our work: PLEASE go to iTunes and write a review or simply, in iTunes, click on STAR to rate us. – we would really appreciate that! Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com  OR David: david@studentcaring.com

OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL – FREE voice number: 1 – (855) NEWWAY- CARE That’s – 1 -(855)639-9292

THIS EPISODE WAS RECORDED ON Wednesday, March 20, 2013

PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY You may find us on: Twitter   Facebook   Google+  Pinterest  and at  STUDENT CARING DOT COM – You may also sign up for our free NEWSLETER – That way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming Book: The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching.

 

The First Year of College and Your Family
The First Year of College and Your Family
Direct download: pod_40.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 1:30pm PST
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College and Finances

In this podcast, we offer some tips for college bound students and their parents about the financial aspects of going to college.

  • Firsts:  Day-To-Day and long-term financial decisions.
  • Financial aid, work, and time enough for school.
  • Credit cards.
Sound Bites:
One of the great permissions of college is to be poor.
 
Professor, I can't come to class because I have to work.
Working during college will intimately reduce your income down the road.
 
Financial Aid or a Loan?
 
For every hour spent in class, you need to plan to study two hours outside of class. 
 
Not enough time to sleep and eat.
 
First and foremost, how much time do I need for my classes?
 
Ask yourself, "Do I want to do this part-time job for the rest of my life?"
 
Why are you going to college?
 
You need to stay the course and delay gratification.
 
Somehow, the credit card companies know that you have just graduated from high school.

 

We welcome your feedback to this podcast and our work: PLEASE go to iTunes and write a review or simply, in iTunes, click on STAR to rate us. – we would really appreciate that! Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com  OR David: david@studentcaring.com

OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL – FREE voice number: 1 – (855) NEWWAY- CARE That’s – 1 -(855)639-9292

THIS EPISODE WAS RECORDED ON Wednesday, March 20, 2013

PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY You may find us on: Twitter   Facebook   Google+  Pinterest  and at  STUDENT CARING DOT COM – You may also sign up for our free NEWSLETER – That way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming Book: The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching.

 

college+finances_small

 

 
 
Direct download: pod_39.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 12:34pm PST
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In this podcast, we discuss the experiences of a high school student from the moment when they receive their acceptance letter to college and the transitional opportunities from high school to college.

  • In life, there are few chances for a new start. Don't be eager to conform.
  • Take advantage of this time to do a self-assessment of your life and formal education to date.
  • What do you want to change about yourself? Reflect about your friends and educational experiences as you prepare for college.

Resources mentioned in this episode:

Please Understand Me

Strengths Finder 2.0

We welcome your feedback to this podcast and our work: PLEASE go to iTunes and write a review or simply, in iTunes, click on STAR to rate us. – we would really appreciate that! Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com OR David: david@studentcaring.com

OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL – FREE voice number: 1 – (855) NEWWAY- CARE That’s – 1 -(855)639-9292

THIS EPISODE WAS RECORDED ON Wednesday, March 20, 2013

PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY You may find us on: Twitter Facebook Google+ and Pinterest At STUDENT CARING DOT COM – You may also sign up for our free NEWSLETER – That way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming Book: The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching.

college_new_start

Direct download: pod_38.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:28am PST
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How to Turn Difficult and Emotional Interactions with Students
Into Priceless Teaching Opportunities

Recently we had the opportunity to present a session at the annual TASS (Teaching Academic Survival Skills) conference in Fort Lauderdale, FL. This conference is a find for people interested in addressing the problems of at-risk students. It’s a fairly small gathering filled with professionals dedicated to the success of students who enter college on the margins—so you find yourself meeting and spending time with dedicated professionals who know of what they speak. It’s also reasonably priced and well run. We highly recommend it.

Sometimes students are at risk because they lack family experience in college, or resources, or good foundational high school experiences. At other times, life simply gets in the way of success. A student may experience an illness, or a family crisis, or a conflict with other students or an instructor. This week’s podcast continues a series on students in crisis; this one takes on a range of situations from the point of view of the professor in getting the best possible outcome out of difficult situations. It’s a recording of our conference presentation with our colleague Prof. Bonni Stachowiak.

Direct download: pod_37.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 4:48pm PST
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Caring for Graduate Students

This week in Student Caring, we continue with our visit to the University of California at Santa Barbara, but this time we talk about student caring on another level.

Graduate students are a forgotten and often misunderstood population on university campuses.  Parents and students may see them as teacher assistants for—or often teachers of—first year courses.  This is often the case, but what we often forget is that grad students are just a year or a few years away from being undergraduates, and yet, we expect them to be experts not only in teaching, but in balancing work and studies, and in managing the challenges of starting families or starting their lives over in a new environment, far from home, in which they often feel invisible.  We know that as graduate students we faced all of these challenges, and found ourselves in competitive programs where the notions of collegiality and mentoring were sought after by many and found by few. We both had great mentors, but we struggled with the other demands of graduate life, and we were part of an environment in which many students, for a host, of reasons, did not finish their studies and struggled with feeling isolated when they thought they would be celebrating meeting life-long goals.

So we invite undergraduates, graduate students, and their professors to join us this week as UC Santa Barbara helps us to get an inside look at graduate studies.

Direct download: pod_36.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 5:36pm PST
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Preventing Student Dying 

It is not supposed to be like this.

The focus, and often pride, of so many families is seeing their daughter or son off to college—a place of hopes, bright futures, and new beginnings.  Yet, estimates from the National Institute on Alcohol, Abusive, and Alcoholism (part of the governmental NIH) places the number of college students who die from alcohol-related causes at 1,825 annually. A practice growing more popular on college campuses called synergy—the mixing of drug and alcohol to produce new experiences—can cause catastrophic physiological effects as well.  According to a university website on health and wellness, when cocaine is combined with alcohol, “cocaine increases heart rate three to five times as much as when either drug is given alone. This can lead to heart attacks and heart failure.” People at the beginning of their adult lives should not be facing the end of their lives… (read more)

This week in Student Caring, we bring you a podcast interviewing one of our friends, and a friend to college students at risk, Dr. Don Lubach.  We spent a day on his campus, the University of California at Santa Barbara, attending an annual summit and speaking to Don and his colleagues about what caring campuses can do to help students who place themselves at risk.

First, a little background is helpful.  In case your notions of drugs and alcohol on campus revolve around either memories tempered by time movies such as Animal House, the CDC weighs in on the problem.  It states that the intermediate effects of something like binge drinking (consuming four or more drinks) have serious immediate and long-term side effects—and we’re not even bringing mixing drugs and alcohol into the picture.  According to CDC studies, immediate effects of binge drinking include unintended trauma (including traffic accidents), falls, drownings, burns, and unintentional firearm injuries.  Effects can also include abuse (including “intimate partner violence”), risky sexual behavior that can end in sexual assault, and alcohol poisoning—a medical emergency.  Alcohol abuse over the long term can work with other physiological and psychological problems to result in addiction, severe depression and anxiety, cardiovascular and neurological issues, and liver disease.

Even limiting the discussion to student success, the effects of even short term use of alcohol or drugs on education can be devastating as well.  Have you ever wondered about a student’s academic performance or changes to his or her behavior?  How can professors identify students in their classes who are at risk, and what should we as professors do?  What level of risks are our students experiencing?

Join us for an important podcast, “Preventing Student Dying.”

- Dr. Daniel de Roulet

We welcome your feedback to this podcast and our work: YOU MAY Go to iTunes and write a review or simply, in iTunes, click on STAR to rate us. – we would really appreciate that! Email us!

Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com  OR David: david@studentcaring.com

OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL – FREE voice number,

1 – (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s – 1 -(855)639-9292

THIS EPISODE WAS RECORDED ON Friday, March 1, 2013

PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY You may find us on: Twitter Facebook Google+ and Pinterest

At STUDENT CARING DOT COM – You may also sign up for our free NEWSLETER - That way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming Book:  The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching.

Direct download: pod_35.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 12:24pm PST
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Responding To Our Students

In this blogpost / podcast we comment on our interviews of the two previous podcasts with Mr. Micah Stratton and Ms. Tasha Levin.

Here are the statements we comment on:

  • Micha:  "I want my class time to count."
  • Micha:  "You have to make us think for ourselves."
  • Micha:  "We are only taking the general education courses because we have to."
  • Micha:  "I think the most popular one (struggle) is time management."
  • Micha:  "I have seen the looks on their (Seniors) faces and they have no ideal what they are doing after they graduate."
  • Tasha:  "After taking a break 'in the real world,' I realized how important an education is and that you can't get anywhere without it."
  • Tasha:  "RATE MY PROFESSORS DOT COM, it's a tool that has never failed me, ever."
  • Tasha:  "I am seeing the teacher turning away students who are trying to get in."
  • Tasha:  "It is the atmosphere that you create as a teacher. That helps to set the pace for the entire semester."

LINKS REFERENCED IN THIS EPISODE

Teaching Academic Survival and Success - Conference

aSleep App - Source of the beach and sea gull sounds.

Teaching and the Case Study Method - Discussion Based Teaching

Rate My Professors dot com.

Apple Movie Trailers.

This episode was recorded in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida on Tuesday, March 19, 2013.

[box] AN INVITATION TO THE STUDENT CARING COMMUNITY:

Students, Professors, Parents, and all of higher education, we invite your feedback on these important topics. Thank you.

[/box]

You May:

Go to iTunes and write a review or simply, in iTunes, click on STAR to rate us. - we would really appreciate that!

Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com  David: david@studentcaring.com

Respond to the BLOG on STUDENTCARING . COM

OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL - FREE voice number, 1 - (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s - 1 -(855) 639-9292

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING & PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY

You may find us on:

Twitter Facebook Google + Pinterest

This way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming eBook and Audio program:  The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching.

 

Direct download: pod_34.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:50pm PST
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Understanding Our Students - Tasha

In this blogpost / podcast we interview our special guest, Ms. Tasha Levin who shares her thoughts about her experiences while in college and responds to our questions.

Here are some highlights from the podcast.

STUDENT CARING:  "What has college been like for you?"

"I felt really lost in a large university."

"I did not know where to go."

"My biggest challenge in California is getting into classes."

"I was number 32 on the petition list!"

STUDENT CARING: "We often now have waiting lists that are larger than the classes."

"Half these kids are going to flake out in two week anyways, LET ME IN!"

STUDENT CARING: "What are the difficulties that students face in College today?

"There is no guarantee at the end that you will get a job, it is very disheartening."

"Students don't take their education seriously."

"It took me a little while to stand up to my parents."

STUDENT CARING: "How do you balance being a student full time and working full time?"

"I learned to prioritize my education as number one."

"My employer allows my education to be my number one priority.

STUDENT CARING: "Can you identify what makes a class great?"

"I enjoy the classes the most when a teacher incorporates us into the discussion."

"I appreciate a break during a lecture."

"It gets our brains moving when we break into groups."

"When the teacher learns everybody's names you feel like a person."

STUDENT CARING: "When do things not go so well in a class?"

"It is exactly like the teacher on 'Wonder Years', boring, the teacher answers all the questions."

STUDENT CARING: "How do you decide which class / professor to take?"

"RATE MY PROFESSOR DOT COM. Almost every person uses this. It is a tool that has never failed me."

"Many times, a student just wants an easy class, they just want to get the grade."

STUDENT CARING: "Does RATE MY PROFESSOR DOT COM influence your course evaluations ?"

"I give my heartfelt evaluation at the end, how else are they going to know?"

STUDENT CARING: "What's your opinion of your fellow students?"

"In Boston, everybody was paying tens of thousands for each class, everybody was very serious."

"Here, (in California) students are more open, it is very diverse."

STUDENT CARING: "How do you think students feel about general education classes?"

"I think a lot of students feel resentful. You know your not going to use it for the rest of your life."

STUDENT CARING: "What advice do you have for administrators and professors?"

"You don't know what is in a students mind until you ask them. People who are older are so far separated, they are not equipped to make those decisions at all.

STUDENT CARING: "Since you will be a teacher one day, what do you think will be most important for you to bring into the classroom as a teacher?"

"I say, it is the atmosphere that you create as a teacher. The class feeds upon that. When they are excited about what they are teaching the students follow through."

"When a professor is really boring, I can't take it."

"A professor can change a class from day to night.  Come in with a smile!"

STUDENT CARING: "Thank you Tasha!"

This episode was recorded in Southern California on Tuesday, February 26, 2013.

[box] AN INVITATION TO THE STUDENT CARING COMMUNITY:

Students, Professors, Parents, and all of higher education, we invite your feedback on these important questions and on the answers given by Ms. Tasah Levin. Thank you.

[/box]

You May:

Go to iTunes and write a review or simply, in iTunes, click on STAR to rate us. - we would really appreciate that!

Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com  David: david@studentcaring.com

Respond to the BLOG on STUDENTCARING . COM

OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL - FREE voice number, 1 - (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s - 1 -(855) 639-9292

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING & PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY

You may find us on:

Twitter Facebook Google + Pinterest

This way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming eBook and Audio program:  The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching.

Direct download: pod_33.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 6:22pm PST
Comments[0]

Understanding Our Students

In this blogpost / podcast we interview our special guest, Mr. Micha Stratton who shares his thoughts about his experiences while in college and responds to our questions.

Here are some highlights from the podcast.

STUDENT CARING:  What is a successful classroom experience?

Mr. Micah Stratton:
"We want to get something out of a class."

"Don't read the syllabus to us."

"I want my class time to count."

"We don't want to be board."

"When there is no diversity - we check out - we want to contribute."

"We love professors who are relaxed, a familiar face."

"A good professor makes us give back to them."

"Be real, take time to digress, we need that mental break."

STUDENT CARING:  WHAT DO YOU STRUGGLE WITH?

Mr. Micah Stratton:
"Busy work in the classroom."

"I love being intellectually stimulated."

"You have to make us think for ourselves."

"We need help to learn what we should learn."

"We are only taking the general eds. because we have to."

"I feel like I am wasting my time, my time is precious."

STUDENT CARING:  What do you observe other students struggling with the most?

Mr. Micah Stratton:
"Time management is something that a lot of people don't figure out."

"I see other students staying up till 3 am because they didn't get all their assignment done."

"We are not thinking in long term chunks, we're just trying to get through the moment."

"Time management is a tough thing for us."

"Do you really want to do that or watch Iron Man?"

STUDENT CARING:  Do you see things that students struggle with in their personal lives?

Mr. Micah Stratton:
"Social life takes up a lot of time."

"People struggle to find something to do with the time that they have."

"Quality relationships and friendships take time, I really struggle with friends, having time for them."

"I choose health and I choose sleep. I am sacrificing."

Mr. Micah Stratton - On procrastination...

"I can find out that morning that I have a test and I usually don't get anything less than an A-.

"Planning ahead for me is just not something that I make time for because I don't have to.

"Half the time students realize they have homework when other students bring it up randomly.

"Procrastination is just something you have time for. Planning ahead is something you don't.

"There's people who procrastinate and it works, and then there's the kind of people who are just lazy and their grade reflects that, and then there's just the person who does the assignment, they don't procrastinate."

Mr. Micah Stratton - On my test taking system...

"I spend 15 seconds - max on a test question."

"CABDD - I memorize that, then fill in the Scantron."

"If you don't know the answer, just move on."

"You need to learn how to take tests well."

STUDENT CARING:  How well do you think your College experiences have prepared you for life after college?

Mr. Micah Stratton: "As an actor there are a lot of things that  are different.

"Do I need a college degree get work? No. But, I do need the classes.

"I  watch seniors graduate and they don't do anything, I see the looks on their faces when they realize they have no idea what they are doing after they graduate."

"It's scary. I'm nervous right now. I don't know what I am going to do."

"It's hard to not feel that I am wasting my time."

"I think that, as a student, we need to be groomed for the future."

"We need our professors and teachers to look outside the box for us."

"College is our time to grow, that is when we are supposed to grow. We get coddled, we get babied."

"I don't know if I'm going to be successful after I graduate, am I wasting my time here?  I'm only 20 once, I'm only in college, once."

STUDENT CARING:  What are your opinions about higher education in general and other opinions that you could honestly share about college.

Mr. Micah Stratton: 
"What's the point of math to a theatre major?"

"Why am I required to take the same class that I took in High School?"

"I feel that we need to find things that help us."

"We need our careers to be molded."

"Professors can put their hand into your life."

"Is it worth all of the time and the money I am spending?"

"Higher Education is important, but it needs to have a point. We want our time be used correctly."

STUDENT CARING:  Has anyone of your prof.s in a general ed class said - "This is how this class will help you?"

Mr. Micah Stratton:
"
I can't remember a time."

"The good things are what keeps me in higher education

AN INVITATION TO THE STUDENT CARING COMMUNITY:

Students, Professors, Parents, and all of higher education, we invite your feedback on these important questions and on the answers given by Mr. Micah Stratton. Thank you.

You May:

Go to iTunes and write a review or simply, in iTunes, click on STAR to rate us. - we would really appreciate that!

Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com  David: david@studentcaring.com

Respond to the BLOG on STUDENTCARING . COM

OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL - FREE voice number, 1 - (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s - 1 -(855) 639-9292

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING & PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY

You may find us on:

Twitter Facebook Google + Pinterest

This way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming eBook and Audio program:  The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching.

 

Direct download: pod_32.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 3:48pm PST
Comments[0]

A "L O N G" Day in the life of Prof. David Pecoraro. This episode picks up from where the previous one left off.

TIMELINE

11:00 am - Stage Lighting Design Class
12:07 pm - Office time - Lunch Break!
02:20 pm - Journey to my Introduction to the Arts Class
02:35 pm - Experiencing a group production number with student choreographer, Bretlyn Schmitt.
03:55 pm - Lighting Class - Lab / Light Call 05:00 pm - Break! Audio tour of my office
05:30 pm - Dinner with my son, Joseph at the university cafeteria
06:45 pm - Return to the theatre for a dress rehearsal for "Little Women"
09:3 0 pm - After the dress rehearsal, David walks back to his office and concludes his day.

Direct download: pod_31.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 7:45am PST
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Podcast 30:

#1 A Day in the Life of a Professor

The Student Caring Project champions the higher education student by surrounding them with a community of support. This community will often consist of family, professors, administrators, and staff. One of our most popular blog posts has been “A Day in the Life of a College Student.”

Following up on that concept, Co-founder, David Pecoraro picked up his digital recorder on the morning of November 26, 2012 and recorded his day. We hope you will be entertained, amused, and quite possibly learn something about, at least, one day in the life of Prof. David C. Pecoraro!

TIMELINE
09:00 am – Departure from home with Joseph Pecoraro
09:20 am – Arrival at Vanguard University of Southern California
10:00 am – Theatre Department faculty meeting

In the next podcast you will hear the remainder of the day.

Direct download: pod30.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 4:41pm PST
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This podcast features Daniel delivering his paper at the Hawaii International Conference on Higher Education.
Now, we take you to the Hilton Hawaiian Village Conference Center - Honolulu - January 6, 2013 - Enjoy!

 Abstract:  The presentation presents a summary of typical approaches to first-year seminar or “introduction to college” courses, and suggests an approach integrated into the liberal arts curriculum that uses cognitive development models to plan student learning outcomes, assignments, and course format.  The redesigned seminar addresses academic preparedness for college work and students’ understanding of a liberal arts curriculum, and prepares students to begin to make the transition into higher levels of thinking.

Daniel de Roulet, Ph.D., Professor of English and co-chair, Irvine Valley College, daniel@studentcaring.com

Direct download: pod29.mp3
Category:Higher Education -- posted at: 8:43am PST
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